Patrick Fitzgerald

Hannah Meisel/WUIS

  The teaching career of former radical James Kilgore remains in doubt. He says one of his contracts with the University of Illinois expires Thursday. But the Board of Trustees ended a meeting Wednesday without taking action on his case.

Kilgore was a member of the Symbionese Liberation Army, a group best known for kidnapping Patty Hearst in 1974. He was convicted of murder for his role in a bank robbery the group carried out the next year.

Vote On New U.S. Attorney Set For Thursday

Sep 20, 2013

Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin's office says the Senate Judiciary Committee plans to vote next Thursday on President Barack Obama's nominee to be the next chief federal prosecutor in Chicago.  
Obama chose Zachary Fardon in May to head the U.S. Attorney's Office for northern Illinois. After more than a decade in the high-profile post, Patrick Fitzgerald resigned last year to enter private practice.  
Durbin spokesman Max Gleischman says the committee will take up Fardon's nomination and likely vote the same day. The full Senate would then vote, possibly just days later.  

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Gov. Pat Quinn has appointed a 15-member independent panel including former U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald to investigate fraud and overhaul Chicago-area public transportation.  
The move follows allegations of political hiring at Metra and calls for change at its overseeing board, the Regional Transportation Authority.  
The Chicago Democrat issued an executive order Thursday creating the Northeastern Illinois Public Transit Task Force. Quinn previewed the idea last week.  

U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald
WUIS/Illinois Issues

On the snowiest day of the year in February 2011 — when 60 mph winds hurled more than a foot of snow on Chicago, stranding drivers and paralyzing the city — U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald decided it would be a nice night for a run.

Intrigued by the extreme conditions, Fitzgerald wanted to feel the full force of the blizzard raging outside his home in Chicago. 

The circumstances surrounding a meeting between U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald and Chicago police detectives in late 2001, shortly after Fitzgerald assumed his post, were extraordinary in two respects. The crime that inspired the meeting was, as murders sometimes are, downright bizarre. But it’s not the nature of the crime that sticks in the mind of Terry Hillard, who retired last month as the Chicago Police Department’s super-intendent. It’s that the meeting took place at all.