Jesse Jackson Jr.

Illinois Issues: Congressional Exploits

Aug 20, 2015
Aaron Schock
Aaron Schock / Instagram

Antics like sexual misconduct, theft and ethical indiscretions have landed Illinois' representatives in trouble for decades.

Sandi and Jesse Jackson Jr. at the 2008 Democratic Convention in Denver
WUIS/Illinois Issues

A friend and former House colleague of Jesse Jackson Jr. says Jackson is being released from a federal prison Thursday and into a halfway house.  

Former Congressman Patrick Kennedy told The Associated Press he recently spoke with Jackson at the minimum security federal prison camp in Montgomery, Alabama.

The son of the civil rights leader has been serving a 2 1/2-year sentence after pleading guilty to illegally spending $750,000 in campaign funds on personal items.  

Sandi and Jesse Jackson Jr. at the 2008 Democratic Convention in Denver
WUIS/Illinois Issues

His predecessor in the U.S. House, Mel Reynolds, went to jail in the mid-’90s, being convicted of bank fraud and having sex with a 16-year-old girl. But Jesse Jackson Jr. was the first son of a candidate for president from Illinois to serve time in prison.

In late October, Jackson Jr. reported to a North Carolina prison camp, where he was expected to serve until December 2015. It was the end of what had been a spectacular rise and a hard fall. He was still trying to come up with the cash to cover his restitution.

Amanda Vinicky

The Rev. Jesse Jackson says he has not visited since his son reported to federal prison late last month.

Former Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. is serving two-and-a-half years in a North Carolina penitentiary. He was convicted of corruption for spending $750,000 of his campaign fund on personal spoils.

"Well his health has been recovering and that has been, as father, the most important thing to me. He has been diligent in doing his work. And I have nothing further to say about that," Rev. Jackson said at the Capitol Thursday (11/7).

An attorney for former U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. says an administrative problem forced the Illinois Democrat to temporarily leave a
federal prison where he was trying to begin his sentence early for illegally
spending campaign money.
 
The former congressman then spent Monday night at a hotel and reported to
prison again Tuesday morning.
 
C.K. Hoffler told reporters in Atlanta Tuesday that she was contacted by Bureau
of Prisons personnel and asked to pick Jackson up about two hours after dropping
him off at the North Carolina prison.

Fmr. Congressman Reports To Prison

Oct 29, 2013

Former Illinois U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. has reported to a North Carolina federal prison to serve a 2 1/2-year prison term for misusing campaign funds.  
Bureau of Prisons spokesman Chris Burke declined to offer details, including when Jackson reported to prison.  
Court documents were never clear about when Jackson must report. In her sentencing order written earlier this year, A federal judge in Washington said only that he would have to surrender no earlier than Nov.1.  

Congressional website

The U.S. Marshals service is suspending a high-profile auction of clothing and memorabilia belonging to convicted former U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. because of questions about the authenticity of some items.  
The agency said Friday that it was scrapping the online auction because of questions about a guitar purportedly signed by Michael Jackson and Eddie Van Halen.  
The service says it will ``conduct a secondary review'' of the items out of ``an abundance of caution.''  

Jesse Jackson Jr.’s star was still rising when he spoke at the 2008 Democratic Convention.
WUIS/Illinois Issues

When Jesse Jackson Jr. walked into a Washington, D.C., federal courthouse in February to plead guilty to federal charges of looting his campaign fund of $750,000, Capitol Hill insiders held a similar reaction.

What could have been?

From the time the Chicago ex-congressman took office, bets were wagered on how high his star would rise: Mayor of Chicago? U.S. Senate?

“I have no other office in mind besides where I’m at now,” Jackson insisted in 1996. “This is my magnificent obsession.”