clean coal

legendsofamerica.com

There was more coal mining under the city of Springfield than previously thought.

Some cases of mine subsidence in the south part of Springfield last year led to a discovery that more ground under Springfield had been mined for coal.

Scott Elrick with the State Geological Survey says they found an area between MacArthur and Fifth and  between Ash and Laurel that had been mined in the 1800's.

Elrick compares the finding to a new discovery when doing family genealogy.

Bill Wheelhouse/WUIS

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin says he met with Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz to discuss the FutureGen clean-coal project.  

Durbin said in a news release that he met with Moniz on Wednesday to discuss the department's commitment to the long-planned public-private project. Durbin said he stressed the importance he sees in keeping it on track.  

The department is providing $1 billion to the $1.68 billion project.  

WUIS

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is accepting public comments on a plan to inject carbon dioxide beneath west central Illinois.

FutureGen Industrial Alliance wants to capture carbon dioxide from a coal-burning power plant in the Morgan County village of Meredosia, then inject it into underground wells near Jacksonville, about 20 miles to the east.  

An artist’s depiction of FutureGen, the near-zero emissions coal plant proposed for construction in Mattoon.
WUIS/Illinois Issues

Although concern over climate change has escalated in recent years, America won’t stop burning coal anytime soon. Coal-fired power plants generate half the nation’s electricity, while creating more than a quarter of all the harmful carbon dioxide pollution in the United States.

Everybody is jumping on the clean coal bandwagon. The buzzword is clean coal, heard in the newspaper offices, radio and TV stations, township halls, city halls, county courthouses, state legislatures and the Governor's Mansion in Illinois. The talk of clean coal is in the U.S. Congress and the White House.

The U.S. government made one big boo-boo in the 1990 Clean Air Act disaster. The coal underground today was on top of the ground 300 million years ago. In the last 11 years the coal mines have just about become as extinct as the dinosaurs.