Arts

The Two-Way
7:06 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Book News: Kenyan Writer Comes Out In Defiance Of Anti-Gay Laws

Binyavanga Wainaina, editor of Kwani?, in 2003 in Nairobi, Kenya.
Khalil Senosi AP

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 12:17 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Kitchen Window
6:48 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Sea Scallops: A Winter Treat From Maine's Chilly Waters

Laura McCandlish for NPR

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 8:52 am

A joy of living in Maine is year-round access to bountiful, relatively affordable, ultra-fresh seafood. Sure, there's the ubiquitous lobster, especially plentiful come summer.

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Book Reviews
6:02 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Music And Chemistry Are An Explosive Combination In 'Orfeo'

W.W. Norton

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 1:47 pm

Richard Powers, whose novels combine the wonders of science with the marvels of art, astonishes us in different ways with each new book. His 11th, Orfeo, is about a 70-year-old avant-garde composer who has sacrificed family and fortune to his relentless pursuit of immortal, transcendent music.

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Fine Art
5:26 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Which Artworks Should We Save? Cash-Strapped Italy Lets Citizens Vote

In a program called L'Arte Auita L'Arte (Art Helping Art) Italy's Ministry of Heritage and Culture and Tourism posted works of art in need of restoration on Facebook. The public was asked to vote for the art it felt was most deserving of a fix-up.
Ministry of Heritage and Culture and Tourism via Facebook

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 9:37 am

When it comes to Italy's enormous art heritage, officials are often faced with an unbearable choice: Which pieces should be saved when the government can't afford to save them all? Now, thanks to an online vote, it's up to Italian citizens to answer that tough question. In the end, some art will get a new lease on life, but many works that epitomize Western civilization remain seriously in danger.

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Monkey See
1:05 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

As NBC Prepares For A Late-Night Transition, Everyone Is On Message (So Far)

Producer Josh Lieb (L) and host Jimmy Fallon talk to critics on Sunday about what's to come.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

It felt like a rerun from a long-ago time, with a twist.

Once again, an NBC executive was facing a crowd of TV critic and reporters, saying nice things about Jay Leno just as he was leaving as host of The Tonight Show.

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Movie Interviews
12:11 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Phoenix To Self: 'Why Am I Talking About This? ... Joaquin, Shut Up'

Joaquin Phoenix's Her character, Theodore, has a job writing intimate — and sometimes erotic — cards and letters on behalf of other people.
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 4:56 pm

Joaquin Phoenix started his acting career in 1982, when he was about 8, on an episode of the TV series Seven Brides For Seven Brothers. (His brother, the late River Phoenix, was a regular in the series.) He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that he still vividly remembers his first time on a set.

"I remember feeling like I was buzzing, like my whole body was vibrating, because it was just so exciting to experience this thing that wasn't real but at moments felt like it was real," he says. "It's basically the feeling that I've been chasing ever since."

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The Two-Way
6:15 am
Tue January 21, 2014

Book News: Billy Collins' Papers Sold To The University Of Texas

Poet Billy Collins is pictured in February 2013 in New York City.
Slaven Vlasic Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:02 am
Tue January 21, 2014

Here, Kitty, Kitty: Even Dog Lovers Should Read 'The Guest Cat'

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 10:06 am

The best novels are often the ones that change us. They speak to a void, sometimes quietly, other times loudly from the proverbial rooftop. When done right, they bring to the surface important questions and compel us to look inward. Over time, they stay with us — like small miracles.

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First Reads
6:02 am
Tue January 21, 2014

Exclusive First Read (And Listen!): B.J. Novak's 'One More Thing'

B.J. Novak is a writer and actor best known for his work on NBC's Emmy Award-winning comedy series The Office. One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories is his first collection.
Jennifer Rocholl

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 11:23 am

You may recognize the name B.J. Novak from the credit sequence of The Office — he was a writer and executive producer. He also played the entertainingly amoral Ryan Howard. Now, Novak is expanding his scope beyond the walls of Dunder Mifflin and taking on a range of human experience in this quirky new story collection, which ranges from linked vignettes to two-line miniplays about carrot cake.

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Food
4:19 am
Tue January 21, 2014

Soba: More Than Just Noodles, It's A Cultural Heritage ... And An Art Form

Genuine soba noodles are difficult to find in the U.S.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 11:10 am

Traditional Japanese cuisine, known as washoku, is now an intangible cultural heritage, according to the United Nations.

Tofu, mochi and miso are a few examples, but it's the buckwheat noodle, or soba, that many consider the humble jewel of Japanese cuisine. It's not easy to find in the U.S., but one Los Angeles woman is helping preserve the craft of making soba.

In a cooking classroom off a busy street in L.A., Sonoko Sakai is teaching about the simplicity of making buckwheat noodles.

"Basically, soba is only two things: flour and water," Sakai explains.

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Author Interviews
3:55 pm
Mon January 20, 2014

For World Superpowers, The Negotiating Table Often Had A Net

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 6:44 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

In the spring of 1971, two global antagonists found a diplomatic opening through an unlikely source, the game of ping-pong.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED NEWSCASTS)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Good evening. The bamboo curtain has been cracked by a ping-pong ball.

MIKE WALLACE: China lifted the bamboo curtain today, long enough to let in 15 American ping-pong players.

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Book Reviews
3:55 pm
Mon January 20, 2014

Book Review: 'Starting Over,' By Elizabeth Spencer

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 6:44 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The Mississippi-born novelist and storywriter Elizabeth Spencer turned 92 last summer. Best known for her novella turned musical drama "The Light in the Piazza," Spencer has just published her 15th work of fiction. It's a collection of stories set in the South called "Starting Over." And we have a review from Alan Cheuse.

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Movie Interviews
3:55 pm
Mon January 20, 2014

'The Hunt' Turns 'Enormous Love' To Fear, Hate

Mads Mikkelsen plays Lucas, a schoolteacher accused of sexual abuse, in Thomas Vinterberg's latest film, The Hunt.
Magnolia

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 6:44 pm

Nominations are in for this year's Academy Awards, and among those up for Best Foreign Language film is The Hunt. It's the latest from Danish director Thomas Vinterberg, who made his reputation in 1998 with The Celebration, which won the Jury Prize at Cannes and went on to become an international success. Both that film and this more recent one depict the aftermath of allegations of sexual abuse.

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Author Interviews
11:02 am
Mon January 20, 2014

The Politics Of Passing 1964's Civil Rights Act

Demonstrators march down Constitution Avenue during the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 5:35 pm

Martin Luther King may not have had a vote in Congress, but he and the movement he helped lead were integral to getting the civil rights bill introduced. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of that bill, now known as the Civil Rights Act.

Among other things, the act outlawed discrimination in public accommodations — including restaurants, hotels and motels — ending the era of legal segregation in those places.

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The Two-Way
6:21 am
Mon January 20, 2014

Book News: Amazon Wants To Ship Products Before You Even Buy Them

An employee prepares an order at Amazon's fulfillment center in San Bernardino, Calif.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 12:34 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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New In Paperback
6:02 am
Mon January 20, 2014

Jan. 19-25: A Twitter Star, An Infamous Murder And Arab World Intimacy

Jeffrey MacDonald before a hearing on July 7, 1970, on the murder charges against him. Errol Morris' book suggests that, despite his conviction, MacDonald was not guilty.
AP

*Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Media
4:19 am
Mon January 20, 2014

Biography Argues Roger Ailes Uses Fox To Divide Nation

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 7:04 am

Roger Ailes is a hero to the political right and a boogeyman to the left for leading the Fox News Channel to become the top-rated force in cable news --- the competition is not even close. Ailes and Fox refused to cooperate with author Gabriel Sherman.

Television
5:36 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

Before 'Jersey Shore' Owned Sleaze, There Was Bobby Bottleservice

Bobby Bottleservice is a recurring character on Nick Kroll's Kroll Show.
Ron Batzdorff Comedy Central

Originally published on Sun January 19, 2014 5:42 pm

Kroll Show, a sketch comedy series from the mind of Nick Kroll, came back this month for a second season on Comedy Central.

Kroll is an expert in over-confident idiot characters — not far off from some of the people you see on reality TV.

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Arts & Life
4:19 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

Can You Bank On Making Movies Destined For The Oscars?

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 4:59 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. Did you notice a theme running through the Oscar nominees for Best Picture?

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "12 YEARS A SLAVE")

CHIWETEL EJIOFOR: (As Solomon Northup) I was born a free man, lived with my family in New York...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (As character) Good for you, man.

EJIOFOR: (As Solomon Northup) ...until the day I was deceived...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: This is Solomon.

EJIOFOR: (As Solomon Northup) ...kidnapped, sold into slavery.

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Movie Interviews
4:19 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

How Breakthrough 'Captain Phillips' Actor Connected To The Role

Originally published on Sun January 19, 2014 5:43 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

"Captain Phillips" is one of those films, a true life story of war and drama. It's based on the story of the hijacking of the Maersk Alabama. Five years ago, pirates attacked the freighter ship off the coast of Somalia. The film star is Tom Hanks as the title character, Captain Richard Phillips, and Barkhad Abdi as the man who leads the charge to capture the ship and crew.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "CAPTAIN PHILLIPS")

BARKHAD ABDI: (As Muse) Look at me.

TOM HANKS: (As Captain Phillips) Sure.

ABDI: (As Muse) Look at me.

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Arts & Life
10:30 am
Sun January 19, 2014

Chilean Soap Star Shines In 'Gloria'

Originally published on Sun January 19, 2014 10:59 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Chilean soap actress Paulina Sanchez is another performer who understands that success can take a long time. Ms. Sanchez has worked on stage and appeared in soap operas in Chile since the 1980s. This year, she stars in the title role of her very first feature film. It's called "Gloria," directed by Sebastian Lelio. The director keeps the camera close on Sanchez as she portrays this hardworking divorced mother of two in her late 50's, who's trying to navigate her life, a life full of unmet expectations.

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The Sunday Conversation
9:06 am
Sun January 19, 2014

Hard-Working Hollywood Extra Hopes For Bigger Roles

Actor Jesse Heiman has had some less-busy years, but says, "this town works in crazy ways ... and your next big day could be tomorrow. So you just gotta keep your head up and keep going."
Bobby Quillard

Originally published on Sun January 19, 2014 10:59 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

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Sunday Puzzle
7:15 am
Sun January 19, 2014

Three B's Bring You To One

NPR

Originally published on Sun January 19, 2014 12:30 pm

On-air challenge: Name a word that, when combined with three words beginning with the letter B, completes a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase. For example, given "brew," "body" and "base," you would say "home" (home-brew, homebody, home base).

Last week's challenge: Name a familiar form of exercise in two words. Switch the order of the two words, then say them out loud. The result, phonetically, will name something to wear. What is it?

Answer: Tae Bo, bow tie

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Author Interviews
7:15 am
Sun January 19, 2014

'Death Class' Taught Students A Lot About Life

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun January 19, 2014 10:59 am

Plenty of college courses delve into the big philosophical questions of life, but Norma Bowe's class was different. For years, the nurse and college professor taught a class that forced students to confront death head-on — there were poems about death, trips to cemeteries and funeral homes, and "goodbye letter" writing assignments. At its core, the class became an opportunity for students to try to come to grips with the death or pending death of a loved one in their own lives.

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Poetry
7:15 am
Sun January 19, 2014

Life's Minutiae Gain New Magnitude In Dunn's 'Lines' Of Poetry

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 8:16 am

Poems dwell in an ambiguous space, shelved somewhere between fiction and fact, imagination and experience. Even when poems seem wholly authentic, we can't assume they're accurate — after all, "poetic license" is the catch-all excuse for blurry lines between truth and fabrication.

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You Must Read This
6:02 am
Sun January 19, 2014

A Half-Century Later, Fearing's 'Big Clock' Still Ticks On

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun January 19, 2014 1:50 pm

Even if you've never read Kenneth Fearing's noir novel The Big Clock, it's likely you already know its basic story and its biggest twist: the book was (very) loosely adapted as the popular (and pretty excellent) 1987 thriller No Way Out, starring Kevin Costner, Gene Hackman and Sean Young.

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The Salt
4:16 am
Sun January 19, 2014

Cooking With Conifers: An Evergreen Trick That's Newly Hip

Gabrielle Hamilton prepares pine needles at Prune Restaurant in New York City.
Julia Gillard

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 12:17 pm

If you still have your Christmas tree up in your living room because you just can't bear the thought of throwing out all that fine pine scent, then you may be an evergreen addict. If you still have it up because you're too lazy to take off the ornaments, then you may be a hoarder, but that's another post.

Fear not, conifer connoisseurs. You don't have to wait for the holidays to surround yourself with spruce. American chefs from coast to coast are using evergreens to develop unique flavors in dishes, from white fir and sorrel broth to pine needle vinegar to smoked mussels.

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Author Interviews
4:50 pm
Sat January 18, 2014

'I'll Take You There': The Staple Singers' Rise From Church To Fame

Mavis Staples performs at the 2013 Waterfront Blues Festival at in Portland, Ore.
Anthony Pidgeon Redferns via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 5:36 pm

Today, the voices of Roebuck "Pops" Staples and his four children — Cleotha, Mavis, Pervis and Yvonne — are woven into America's DNA. As the Staple Singers, the family created a sound that was part blues, part gospel and part folk, breaking down musical walls and inspiring civil rights leaders.

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The New And The Next
4:50 pm
Sat January 18, 2014

A Film Producer On The Rise, Hollywood Gets Biblical

Kevin Kwan

Originally published on Sun January 19, 2014 9:29 am

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest feature stories.

This week, Watson talks about a rising film producer who is getting his big break this year and the swath of films coming out dealing with biblical stories and Greek mythology.

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The Salt
12:10 pm
Sat January 18, 2014

And The Best Supporting Actor Award Goes To ... Side Dishes

To appeal to the high-rollers of the world, like the ones in The Wolf of Wall Street with Leonardo DiCaprio, restaurants are doling out more expensive sides.
Mary Cybulski AP

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 4:57 pm

There's a lot that's over the top about "The Wolf of Wall Street," the Oscar-nominated film that's up for best pictures. Including the side dishes.

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