Arts

Arts
9:15 am
Thu March 27, 2014

New Sangamon Valley Youth Symphony Exec. Director

Elle Pressly
Credit WUIS

The Sangamon Valley Youth Symphony has a new Executive Director. 

Elle Pressly is a clarinetist who majored in music at the University of Illinois.  She now teaches music education in the Jacksonville School District.

Her new role will become full time when the school year ends.  It will involve marketing, fundraising and handling the day to day operations of the SVYS.  

The organization provides orchestral instruction to area youth,  as young as 3rd grade.  

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Ask Me Another
9:02 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Foodie Favorites, Part III: Dessert

Start with a musical game that "Sounds Delicious," then find a challenge in "Crisp Game Arenas"— and identify dishes from anagrams. For a palate cleanser, enjoy a final round that is all about water.

Heard in Episode 005: Foodie Favorites

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Ask Me Another
8:57 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Foodie Favorites, Part II: Dinner

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:02 am

Hear Bon Appetit editor-in-chief Adam Rapoport dish about his dislike of the term "foodie" and play a game based on fast food Yelp! reviews. Plus, mash up foods and bands at the "Soft Rock Cafe."

Heard in Episode 005: Foodie Favorites

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Ask Me Another
8:57 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Foodie Favorites, Part I: Brunch

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:02 am

Dig in as we revisit "Breakfast Cereal Haiku," a game that puts a poetic spin on your favorite childhood cereals, and "Natalie Portmantoast," in which we mash up celebrities with the names of foods.

Heard in Episode 005: Foodie Favorites

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Monkey See
8:50 am
Thu March 27, 2014

'Tell Me Two Things Good': A Happiness Experiment

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 3:16 pm

One of my old pals used to come walking into a room at the end of a long day, sigh, look around, and say, "Tell me two things good." They could be big things, small things, anything — he had to hear two things, and they had to be good things, and you had to think of them right away.

Wednesday night, I asked Twitter this crucial question. Here are some of the responses.

The Two-Way
6:31 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Book News: Shaken, Stirred: Ian Fleming's Racy Love Letters To Be Sold

Ian Fleming, best-selling British author and creator of James Bond, is seen in this 1962 photo.
AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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New In Paperback
6:03 am
Thu March 27, 2014

March 22-28: The CIA, Central Bankers And Summer Camp

Cover of The Alchemists

*Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Theater
1:57 am
Thu March 27, 2014

At 81, Playwright Athol Fugard Looks Back On Aging And Apartheid

In 1961, South African playwright Athol Fugard put black and white actors on stage together in his breakout play Blood Knot. He's pictured above in the 1970s.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:18 am

Under apartheid, trying to make an artistic political statement was difficult — artists were subject to scrutiny and even arrest. On the other hand, making a political statement was easy: All one had to do was put black and white actors on a stage together.

That's exactly what South African playwright Athol Fugard did back in 1961 with his breakout play Blood Knot. His newest play, The Shadow of the Hummingbird, is now onstage at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, Conn.

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Books
5:14 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

In Karen Russell's World, Sleep Is For The Lucky Few

cover detail
Atavist Books

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:14 am

Getting much sleep lately? The citizens of Karen Russell's dystopian novella, Sleep Donation, haven't been getting any. It's the near future, and America has been suffering from an insomnia crisis where hundreds of thousands of cases are terminal. And so an agency called Slumber Corps has been established to battle the problem.

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Book News & Features
4:35 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

It Was The Best Of Sentences ...

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 1:41 pm

Have you ever had a sentence stop you in your tracks? Editors at The American Scholar magazine have put out their list of the "Ten Best Sentences" in fiction and nonfiction. Associate editor Margaret Foster says the inspiration came from water cooler talk around the office.

"We're sometimes struck by a beautiful sentence or maybe a lousy sentence, and we'll just say, 'Hey, listen to this,' " she says.

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Author Interviews
1:50 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

'Sleep Donation': A Dark, Futuristic Lullaby For Insomniacs

efenzi iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 3:42 pm

Imagine an America that has been plagued for years by a mysterious epidemic of insomnia — an affliction so serious that many are dying from lack of sleep. That's the futuristic premise of Karen Russell's new novella, Sleep Donation.

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Book Reviews
1:50 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

'Redeployment' Explores Iraq War's Physical And Psychic Costs

Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 7:13 pm

Here's an old joke you may have heard: "How many Vietnam vets does it take to screw in a light bulb?" Answer: "You wouldn't know, you weren't there."

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Shots - Health News
1:32 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

A 'Silent Killer' Returns: Live Chat With Filmmaker On Fighting TB

Nokubheka, 12, had to move away from her family and into a hospital for treatment against drug-resistant tuberculosis.
Screenshot from PBS/YouTube

The world has a new epidemic on its hand: drug-resistant tuberculosis.

We're not talking about the kind of TB that doctors can cure with a few weeks of standard antibiotics.

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Technology
10:46 am
Wed March 26, 2014

The Changing World Of Tech Requires A Woman's Eye

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 1:09 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
10:46 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Walter Mosley: To End Race, We Have To Recognize 'White' Doesn't Exist

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 11:41 am

Walter Mosley's writing inspired Hollywood filmmakers and a generation of black writers. He's now being honored at the National Black Writers' Conference. He talks about the award and his new book.

The Two-Way
7:10 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Book News: Tennessee Williams Tale Of Disappointed Love To Be Published

Playwright Tennessee Williams sits at his typewriter on Nov. 11, 1940, in New York.
Dan Grossi AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Kitchen Window
11:33 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

The Secret To These Sauces Is Nuts

Claire Adas for NPR

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 8:26 am

I grew up thinking of nuts as junk food: full of fat and calories, a guilty treat for holidays and special occasions. I remember bowls of salty cocktail mix, nut-covered cheese logs, sweet buttery honey-roasted peanuts and cashews, or Jordan almonds in their strangely addictive sugary coating. They were in the same category as potato chips and candy: irresistible, but not good for you at all.

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Author Interviews
4:06 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

'Sous Chef' Reveals The High-Adrenaline Dance Behind Your Dinner

Viktor Cap iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 7:03 pm

A restaurant kitchen at the peak of the dinner rush can be a crazy place — hot, crowded and filled with a kind of intense energy that some people, like Michael Gibney, thrive on. Gibney's been working in restaurants since he was young. In his new book, Sous Chef, Gibney tries to capture the rhythm of the kitchen by taking his readers through one day in the life of a fast-paced New York restaurant.

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Strange News
3:16 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

RIP ET: The Legend Of The Long-Buried Video Game

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 6:28 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

"E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial" is a beloved and popular Steven Spielberg movie from 1982. Less known is that E.T. was also a video game.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

CORNISH: A lousy game. In fact, it's regarded as one of the worst ever made. It has a few problems.

NICK MONTFORT: Well...

(LAUGHTER)

MONTFORT: ...it's hard to know where to start.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

That's Nick Montfort, associate professor of Digital Media at MIT.

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Book Reviews
1:05 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

'Thief' Delivers An Unfiltered Depiction Of Life In Lagos

Derrick Ceyrac AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 2:07 pm

Let's get the negative stuff out of the way first. Teju Cole's Every Day Is For The Thief is not much of a novel. Forget plot or character development: This is a piece of writing that's all about setting. If you take what Cole is offering here and value it on its own terms, you'll probably appreciate the curious magic at work in this slim not-quite-a-novel. In chapters that stand as separate, short vignettes, Every Day Is For The Thief describes a young New York doctor's visit back to his hometown of Lagos, Nigeria.

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Theater
12:57 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Repeat Offenders On The Great White Way

Kelli O'Hara and Steven Pasquale co-star in the new Broadway production of The Bridges of Madison County. It's the third time they've played opposite each other.
Joan Marcus

Caissie Levy and Will Swenson were so used to playing lovers that they weren't sure how to play enemies.

They first got romantic in the 2009 revival of Hair, as the doomed couple Sheila and Berger. Then last year, they cast forbidden sparks as the adulterous leads in the rock musical Murder Ballad.

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The Two-Way
6:20 am
Tue March 25, 2014

Book News: Authors Rip U.K. Ban On Sending Books To Prisoners

Philip Pullman, pictured in 2007, says of the U.K. prison restrictions: "Words nearly fail me on this."
Shaun Curry AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue March 25, 2014

A Lyrical Meditation On Grief In 'Falling Out Of Time'

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 9:44 am

I am a mortal reader; I have my flaws. I don't usually enjoy prose poems or novels written in lines of poetry, and when I see character types with names in capital letters like the ones that appear in Israeli writer David Grossman's new Falling Out of Time — The Walking Man, the Net Mender, the Midwife, the Town Chronicler — I tend to prepare to pack up, close the book, and turn to something less allegorical.

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Author Interviews
2:19 am
Tue March 25, 2014

For Writer, 'The Hard Way' Meant Choosing To Stay In Akron, Ohio

Akron was once known as the rubber capital of the world.
Mark Duncan AP

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 10:17 am

When it comes to his hometown of Akron, Ohio, writer and journalist David Giffels says, "I have spent my whole life watching people leave." Once known as the rubber capital of the world, Akron was a hub of tire manufacturing giants. Goodyear, Firestone and Goodrich provided thousands of high-paying jobs until the 1970s, when those jobs began migrating to places with cheaper labor.

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Television
4:03 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Fans Of 'The Good Wife' Rocked By [Spoiler Alert]

Matthew Goode (left) as Finn Polmar and Josh Charles (right) as Will Gardner in Sunday night's episode of CBS's The Good Wife.
CBS

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 5:46 pm

The CBS legal drama The Good Wife centers on smart, attractive Chicago lawyer Alicia Florrick. She's "the good wife" because she stood by her politician husband when he cheated on her.

But the show's most compelling story line has always been between Alicia and another lawyer, Will Gardner. And if you don't want to know what happened in that storyline last night, stop reading NOW.

No, Really: Major Spoiler Ahead

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Architecture
4:00 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

In The Face Of Disaster, Pritzker Winner Shigeru Ban Designs Solutions

Cardboard Church, Christchurch, New Zealand.
Stephen Goodenough Photographer Shigeru Ban Architects

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 8:19 pm

Each year the Pritzker Architecture Prize goes to a star architect with a long list of glamorous commissions around the globe. This year's winner is a little different.

Shigeru Ban has designed museums, homes and concert halls. But Ban is best known for a more humble kind of work: The temporary structures he's built for refugees and evacuees all over the world.

Ban may be the only architect in the world who makes buildings out of paper — cardboard paper tubes, to be precise.

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Author Interviews
3:24 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

A Homecoming, Minus The Nostalgia, In Cole's Unsparing 'Thief'

Teju Cole is also the author of Open City.
Teju Cole

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 5:46 pm

"Like it or not, America has softened you" — such are the words of welcome to the unnamed narrator of Teju Cole's Every Day Is for the Thief. The young man is on a trip to his home country of Nigeria, and as he visits his family and friends in Lagos, what he finds isn't quite what he expected: He's pressed for bribes at every turn. He tries to reconcile Nigeria's history with the museums that appear to avoid it. He sees the "Yahoo boys" at an Internet cafe, tapping out scam email messages.

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The Salt
2:33 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Sandwich Monday: We Tackle The Army's 'Pork Rib' MRE

Designed by a Michelin four-star general
NPR

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 12:50 pm

We got our hands on an MRE — a "Meal, Ready to Eat" from the Department of Defense. It's a real marvel of engineering. In one flat bag, there's an imitation McRib, clam chowder, a couple of drinks, and some trail mix, and some note about how by eating this you consent to joining the Marines. All in one flat bag!

Special Guest Mike Pesca: This meal disgusts me more before 8 a.m. than most meals disgust me all day.

Miles: I'm going to imitation eat this imitation pork rib.

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Monkey See
1:56 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Book Club Meeting: Come Talk About 'Grapes Of Wrath,' Chapters 11-20

A family prepares to leave Oklahoma for California in 1939, just as the Joads did in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath.
Russell Lee Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 3:44 pm

We made it to California! And if you're reading along, you, like us, are two-thirds of the way through John Steinbeck's Dust Bowl classic. So it's time again for us to gather and share our thoughts.

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Author Interviews
12:01 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

New Yorker Cartoon Editor Explores What Makes Us Get It

Bob Mankoff/The New Yorker Collection/Condé Nast

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 3:43 pm

Bob Mankoff has been contributing cartoons to The New Yorker ever since 1977 and now, as cartoon editor, he evaluates more than 500 cartoons submitted to the magazine each week.

Mankoff is proud of the many cartoons that have been published under his aegis. "Sometimes I take my aegis out of my drawer just to admire it," he writes.

His most well-known cartoon shows an executive looking at his desk calendar, saying to someone on the phone: "No, Thursday's out. How about never — is never good for you?"

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