Arts

Art & Design
2:01 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Picture This: Illustrator Gets Inspired By The Morning News

Maria Fabrizio

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 11:45 am

People don't often think of the news as a source of inspiration — and certainly not a source of daily inspiration. But that's what it's turned into for Maria Fabrizio, an illustrator based in Columbia, S.C.

For about a year, Fabrizio has been working on a project called Wordless News, in which she draws one image a day based on a story she hears or reads that morning. Starting Monday, she'll spend a week creating images inspired by what she hears on Morning Edition.

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Movie Interviews
1:59 am
Fri January 10, 2014

A 'Wolf' On The Loose, And Loving The Carnage

Other people's money: Leonardo DiCaprio plays high-living stock swindler Jordan Belfort in The Wolf of Wall Street.
Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 12:44 pm

Leonardo DiCaprio was born in Los Angeles, an only child whose father worked in comics and named him after artist Leonardo da Vinci. DiCaprio began his career as a child actor, appearing in TV commercials and shows before transitioning to films.

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The Salt
6:40 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Food Firms Trim Trillions Of Calories From Packaged Treats

To make a more healthful version of Edy's Grand Ice Cream, Nestle developed a technology that could cut half the fat and two-thirds of the calories from the frozen treat.
Erik S. Lesser Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 7:30 am

It sounds impressive: Major food companies have slashed 6.4 trillion calories from packaged foods they sold in 2012 compared with 2007, a study reported Thursday.

But for each American, that number translates to about 78 fewer calories purchased each day, or the equivalent of cutting out one apple or 3 1/2 Hershey's Kisses.

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Remembrances
4:16 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Amiri Baraka's Legacy Both Controversial And Achingly Beautiful

Amiri Baraka, shown here in 1972, was a renowned poet whose politics strongly shaped his work.
Julian C. Wilson AP

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 9:31 am

One of America's most important — and controversial — literary figures, Amiri Baraka, died on Thursday from complications after surgery following a long illness, according to his oldest son. Baraka was 79.

Baraka co-founded the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s. His literary legacy is as complicated as the times he lived through, from his childhood — where he recalled not being allowed to enter a segregated library — to the 2001 attack on the World Trade Center. His poem about that attack, "Somebody Blew Up America," quickly became infamous.

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Digital Life
4:14 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Many Younger Facebook Users 'Unfriend' The Network

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 6:36 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

With over a billion users worldwide, Facebook is arguably the most popular social media site around. Teens and early 20-somethings are its biggest users. But as NPR's Patti Neighmond reports, there are growing signs of disenchantment with the site.

PATTI NEIGHMOND, BYLINE: Genevieve Brown is 19 years old, a sophomore at New York's Sarah Lawrence College and an avid Facebook user since junior high. It used to be a great joy. But lately, not so much.

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Television
4:14 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Revenge Of The 'Nerdist': Chris Hardwick Takes Over Your TV

Chris Hardwick was unhappy as the host of a dating show before he embraced his geeky interests and started the Nerdist empire. Now he hosts Talking Dead, shown here, and the new Comedy Central show @midnight.
Jordin Althaus AMC

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 6:36 pm

Chris Hardwick could be the nerd king of television. Crown or no crown, no one is a better guide for TV-obsessed fans.

Hardwick's biggest gig is hosting Talking Dead, a show where he and his guests dissect the gore and heartbreak in each episode of AMC's zombie drama The Walking Dead.

"I'm just lucky that people need therapy after a show like The Walking Dead. That's what we provide," Hardwick explains. "We provide a comedown so you can get into bed and your brain stops buzzing."

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Found Recipes
4:14 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Slow Cook Your Way To The Colonel's Secret Recipe

Stephanie O'Dea came up with a healthy slow-cooker recipe to mimic Colonel Sanders secret-recipe.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 6:36 pm

It is time to give the humble slow cooker its due.

If you associate this hard-working table-top appliance with the 1970s (along with decorative owls, the color combination of burnt orange and brown, and perhaps chunky pleather boots) ditch the quick dismiss and embrace the vibe. A slow cooker can be a busy person's best friend.

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Book Reviews
4:14 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

A Story Of Pluck And Courage In An Unforgiving Future

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 6:36 pm

The imagined near future of Chang-Rae Lee's new novel is entirely credible. So much so that one is, for much of the book, lulled into reading the story as merely a warning of the perils of unbridled consumerism and neglect of our environment. And indeed, yes, there is that, but there is so much more besides.

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Movie Reviews
4:02 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

A Tournament Of Terror, But It's All About ... Empowerment?

In Raze, stunt performer and actress Zoe Bell plays Sabrina, a woman kidnapped and forced to fight for her life in an underground tournament.
IFC

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 1:36 pm

Raze may be a term most often associated with buildings, but in Josh C. Waller's debut feature, it's something done to bodies and minds. The film takes the power dynamics and the gladiatorial spectacle of the Hunger Games — the powerful forcing the unsuspecting to fight to the death, mostly for the sick entertainment of the rich — and crosses it with the lurid exploitation of '60s women-in-prison cinema, only without the sex.

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Movie Reviews
4:02 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

In A Past-Plagued Laos, A Youth Chases A Future

Kia (Loungnam Kaosainam) and Ahlo (Sitthiphon Disamoe) bond when they encounter each other in a Laotian refugee village in The Rocket.
Tom Greenwood Kino Lorber

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 5:02 pm

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Movie Reviews
4:02 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

A Nation And Its Youth, Struggling To Be 'In Bloom'

In the chaos of post-independence Georgia, 14-year-old Natia (Mariam Bokeria) receives a present from her romantic interest — a gun — in In Bloom.
Big World Pictures

The title of In Bloom refers both to the movie's 14-year-old protagonists, Eka and Natia, and to the burgeoning Georgian nation where the film, set a year after that country's independence, is set. The double meaning becomes clear early on. What takes longer to recognize is the title's bitter irony.

The film takes place in 1992, by which point the newly sovereign Georgia had already started descending into what would become years of civil war, particularly in Abhkazia and South Ossetia, two territories with Russian-backed independence movements of their own.

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Movie Reviews
4:02 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Mommy Issues Writ Large For A Troubled Teen

Kaya Scodelario plays a melodramatic teenager obsessed with her mother's death in The Truth About Emanuel, the second film from director Francesca Gregorini.
Tribeca Film

What's a domestic melodrama without a mom to kill off, to sicken, to render monstrous or otherwise AWOL?

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The Two-Way
3:38 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Writer And Activist Amiri Baraka Dies At Age 79

Poet and activist Amiri Baraka, seen here during the 1972 Black Political Convention in Gary, Ind., has died at age 79.
Julian C. Wilson AP

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 6:26 pm

Amiri Baraka, the writer who was born LeRoi Jones, has died at age 79. Baraka's career spanned art and activism: He was an influential poet and an award-winning playwright who didn't shy away from social criticism and politics.

"Baraka had long struggled with diabetes, but it was not immediately clear what the cause of death was," reports the New Jersey Star-Ledger. The author and activist was a native of Newark.

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It's All Politics
3:16 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Gates Unleashed: Ex-Defense Chief Goes Scorched Earth On Congress

In his new memoir, Defense Secretary Robert Gates is unsparing in his criticism of Congress.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 7:14 pm

Former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates made international news this week with the release of a memoir that serves up a big helping of unvarnished criticism of his former boss, President Obama.

But his scalding of the sitting commander in chief seems practically tame compared to the beat down he delivers to members of Congress.

And that includes Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, who, Gates asserts, once urged him to have the Defense Department "invest in research on irritable bowel syndrome."

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Book Reviews
2:02 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

'Stringer': Finding Your Feet In The Chaos Of Congo

Image from cover of Stringer

Originally published on Fri January 17, 2014 11:19 am

In journalism, a stringer is a freelance reporter or photographer who gets paid on the basis of each story or picture sold. So, much of the time there's no regular salary, no living allowance, and often, no travel subsidy. It's a tough way to make a living; especially since the competition in a major market like New York or London is prohibitively fierce. The trick for a young journalist is to find a location rich in material but light on the competitive side; the more poverty-stricken, dirty, corrupt and dangerous, the better.

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Movie Interviews
1:06 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Not-So-Cheery Disposition: Emma Thompson On Poppins' Cranky Creator

In Saving Mr. Banks, Emma Thompson plays Mary Poppins author P.L. Travers, who, Thompson says, hated the whole idea of having her book made into a film.
Francois Duhamel Disney Enterprises

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 5:13 pm

Emma Thompson grew up in London, the daughter of two actors. She went to Cambridge University, then began performing in sketch comedy on stage and television before getting into dramatic roles.

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Book Reviews
1:00 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Empty Nester In 'The Woods': A Modern Dantean Journey

drbimages iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 1:27 pm

Midway upon the journey of our life
I found myself within a forest dark,
For the straightforward pathway had been lost.

Allowing for translation, those are the immortal opening lines of Dante's Divine Comedy. Here, some seven centuries later, are some of Lynn Darling's opening lines from her new memoir, Out of the Woods: "The summer my only child left home for college, I moved from an apartment in New York City, to live alone in a small house at the end of a dirt road in the woods of central Vermont."

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Monkey See
10:44 am
Thu January 9, 2014

'Parks And Recreation': Good For Nerds, Good For America

Amy Poehler as Leslie Knope and Adam Scott as Ben Wyatt on NBC's deeply pro-nerd Parks And Recreation.
Colleen Hayes NBC

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 1:56 pm

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Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Colorful Names

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

What do Vanna White, James Brown, and Ron Burgundy have in common? In this final round, puzzle guru Art Chung asks you to identify famous people or fictional characters who has a color in their name.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Happy Geek Colors

Potter and designer Jonathan Adler takes to the puzzle podium for his Ask Me Another challenge.
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

Host Ophira Eisenberg puts designer Jonathan Adler in the puzzle hot seat for a quiz all about how certain colors got their name. Does the guy who coined the word "chambeige" know which color is named after a desert-dwelling animal that also gives its hair to make overcoats? Find out.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Homophones To Phone Home About

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

What would you call a type of neck-wear worn while participating in a form of exercise founded by Billy Blanks? A "Tae Bo-bow tie"! In this game, host Ophira Eisenberg offers clues to phrases or compound words that change meaning when the words are reversed.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me What To Do

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

Unfortunately, you won't be able to duet with Carl Kasell in this game. But we encourage you to sing along and identify songs with the word "don't" in the title, as performed by house musician Jonathan Coulton. For starters, we're pretty sure that Andrew Lloyd Webber song is not called "Don't Drink That Blue Margarita."

Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Random Questions With: Jonathan Adler

Jonathan Adler in New York City.
Joshua McHugh

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

Designer Jonathan Adler's colorful, eye-popping pillows, rugs and vases adorn the interiors of many discerning homeowners, but his dream of creating a home furnishings empire was nearly deferred. Early in his career, discouragement from his pottery teacher at the Rhode Island School of Design and several unfulfilling jobs at talent agencies in New York City left Adler at his wit's end. But these events only fueled his fire to live out the pottery dream. Adler taught night classes at a pottery studio called Mud, Sweat & Tears (potter puns!) and eventually opened his own studio.

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Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Indigenous Diligence

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

If Neapolitans are people from Naples, where do Sconnies come from? This game, led by house musician Jonathan Coulton, is all about demonyms — words that describe a person who hails from a particular geographic location.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Brevity Is The Soul Of Wit

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 11:48 am

In keeping with the title of this game, we'll keep this explanation short. All the answers in this game will be two-letter words. That's it!

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Record
7:02 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Loving Morrissey The Way We Used To, Despite Lacerating 'Autobiography'

Morrissey performing in Seattle last March.
Mat Hayward FilmMagic

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 11:31 am

"Loudly and wildly the music played, always pointing to the light, to the way out, or the way in, to individualism, and to the remarkable if unsettling notion that life could possibly be lived as you might wish it to be lived."

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The Two-Way
6:06 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Book News: Cache Of Letters From 'Frankenstein' Author Found

An image of author Mary Shelley, circa 1830.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 6:40 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Author Interviews
3:30 am
Thu January 9, 2014

A Former Child Soldier Imagines 'Tomorrow' In Sierra Leone

Orphaned by the civil war in Sierra Leone, Ishmael Beah told his own story in A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier. Radiance of Tomorrow is his first novel.
John Madere Sarah Crichton Books/Farrar, Straus and Giroux,

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 9:21 am

Ishmael Beah was just barely a teenager when his town became engulfed in Sierra Leone's civil war in the mid-1990s. In his 2007 memoir, A Long Way Gone, Beah describes how, after he lost his parents and brothers to the conflict, he wandered the countryside with a band of boys and was recruited as a child soldier by government forces. The memoir describes the hellish atrocities committed by child soldiers on both sides of the conflict.

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Europe
2:37 am
Thu January 9, 2014

No Rain On His Parade: Parisian Preserves Art Of Umbrella Repair

An estimated 15 million umbrellas are thrown away in France each year. Thierry Millet is trying to change that, one umbrella repair at a time.
Lejeune Maxppp /Landov

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 9:21 am

When an umbrella breaks, most people just throw it away — and pick up another one, from a street vendor or maybe a drugstore.

But what if you got it repaired instead? Would you even be able to find someone who could do the work?

In Paris, it's still possible, but just barely. What was once a thriving profession has dwindled dramatically. These days, Thierry Millet, 58, says he is the city's last umbrella repairman.

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Author Interviews
6:08 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

In An Age Of Slavery, Two Women Fight For Their 'Wings'

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 9:29 pm

Sue Monk Kidd's new novel is a story told by two women whose lives are wrapped together — beginning, against their wills, when they're young girls. One is a slave; the other, her reluctant owner. One strives her whole life to be free; the other rebels against her slave-owning family and becomes a prominent abolitionist and early advocate for women's rights.

The book, The Invention of Wings, takes on both slavery and feminism — and it's inspired by the life of a real historical figure.

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