Arts

Movie Reviews
4:14 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Erroll Morris Makes Rumsfeld Story Film Friendly

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 7:22 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's compare two documentary films about two wartime Secretaries of Defense. Errol Morris directed "Fog of War," about a Pentagon leader in the Vietnam-era. And Morris's new film focuses on Donald Rumsfeld, Defense Secretary during the war in Iraq.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "THE UNKNOWN KNOWN")

DONALD RUMSFELD: There are no knowns. There are known unknowns. There are unknown unknowns. But there are also unknown knowns. That is to say, things that you think you know that it turns out you did not.

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NPR Story
3:59 am
Fri April 4, 2014

David Letterman To Retire From CBS In 2015

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 7:22 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

David Letterman says he will retire next year. He'll leave "The Late Show" as the longest-serving late night host in network television history, even longer than Johnny Carson when you add up Letterman's time at CBS and NBC before that. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans says Letterman reshaped late night TV and succeeded as an edgy outsider more interested in making fun of show business than participating in it.

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NPR Story
3:59 am
Fri April 4, 2014

App Calculates TV-Watching Time

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 7:22 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And our last word in business is: Tube Time.

A new app, tells you how much time you've spent watching TV.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's called tiii.me. That's tiii.me. Tell tiii.me., which shows you've watched, and the app calculates how much of your life you spent. You watched all of "Breaking Bad," that's two days and 14 hours.

WERTHEIMER: With some TV, of course, it's probably better not to know how much time you'll never get back.

Television
6:35 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Dave Letterman Signals He'll Soon Put Down The Microphone

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

David Letterman, the longest-serving late night television host, is retiring.

(SOUNDBITE OF SHOW, 'LATE NIGHT WITH DAVID LETTERMAN')

DAVID LETTERMAN: Sometime in the not-so-distant future, 2015 for the love of God, in fact, Paul and I will be wrapping things up and taking a hike.

SIEGEL: Letterman, who is 66, told the audience today during a taping of his late show program which will air tonight. Here to talk about David Letterman is NPR TV critic Eric Deggans. And Eric, why has Letterman decided to retire now?

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Book Reviews
5:27 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Dinaw Mengestu Embraces The Vastness Of Love And War

Eli Meir Kaplan Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:34 pm

Why do love and war go so well together in novels? It isn't only because they're both naturally dramatic themes. Sometimes, in fact, each is so big and overwhelming that they can seem beyond the grasp of words. And so a writer who tries to show the struggle of two people with deep feelings for each other, "set against a backdrop of violence" (as a novel's flap copy might read), can just seem like he's overreaching. But Dinaw Mengestu uses love and war to powerfully explore a third, equally dramatic theme: identity.

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Monkey See
3:57 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

An Interview With A Hypothetical Super-Independent Athlete Baby

A very independent baby.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 4:00 pm

It might have seemed like an unsurprising thing to do when Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy took three entire days off to tend to his newborn child, but if you listen to sports commentary, you know that it was not without controversy.

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Author Interviews
3:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

In The 1870s And '80s, Being A Pedestrian Was Anything But

Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 10:58 am

We may think of baseball as America's national pastime, but in the 1870s and 1880s there was another sports craze sweeping the nation: competitive walking. "Watching people walk was America's favorite spectator sport," Matthew Algeo says in his new book, Pedestrianism.

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Television
2:28 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

HBO Fills Sunday Night Lineup With Entertaining Power Struggles

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 3:48 pm

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. This Sunday HBO presents the season premiers of two returning series - "Game of Thrones" and "VEEP" - and launches a new series, a Mike Judge comedy called "Silicon Valley." Our TV critic David Bianculli has seen them all.

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Author Interviews
2:28 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Embarrassing Stains? This Housekeeping Guide Gets That Life Is Messy

Jolie Kerr says when you have a fresh red wine stain, pouring table salt — no water — on it will suck it right up. "You can go pour some wine on your carpet tonight and try it out!" she says.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 3:48 pm

Jerry Seinfeld used to joke that if you have bloodstains on your clothes, you probably have bigger problems than your laundry. But Jolie Kerr is here to help with all the stains — her new book is titled My Boyfriend Barfed in My Handbag ... and Other Things You Can't Ask Martha.

Kerr is known for giving cleaning advice for unconventional and embarrassing housecleaning and laundry problems — without the judgment of the typical holier-than-thou housekeeping advice columnist.

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DEMO Project
1:39 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Local Professor Combines Art, Lincoln & Drones

Erica Holst, curator of collections at SAA and artist Mike Miller
Credit Rachel Otwell/WUIS

This weekend two openings will take place on the campus of the Springfield Art Association. One will combine the artworks of University of Illinois Springfield faculty in an exhibit called, Trigger: New Work by UIS Art Faculty. That will be in the new M.G. Nelson Family Gallery. The reception is on Friday, 5:30-7:30pm. The exhibit will run through April 25.  

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The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Smithsonian's Air And Space Museum To Get $30 Million Spiffier

Where's the moon rock? Curators say national treasures are often overlooked in the museum's current display, which hasn't changed much since 1976.
National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:34 pm

Throngs of museum-goers mill through the grand entrance hall of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., every day, gawking at such treasures as the Apollo 11 capsule that carried Neil Armstrong's crew to the moon and back, as well as Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis airplane.

But the famous Milestones of Flight exhibit hasn't significantly changed since the museum opened in 1976.

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My Big Break
10:52 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Inflatable Suit Launches Stylist To Stardom

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 8:37 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We just mentioned that dancing on "Soul Train" was the big break for a number of entertainers like Rosie Perez and Jody Watley. Well, our colleagues at All Things Considered have been hearing stories from a number of other people about the moment when their careers took off.

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Author Interviews
10:52 am
Thu April 3, 2014

How 'Soul Train' Shaped A Generation

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 8:37 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we're going to take a trip down memory lane or we should probably say down the soul train line.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "SOUL TRAIN")

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Ask Me Another
8:49 am
Thu April 3, 2014

What's In A Name? Another Name

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 10:59 am

What do Martin Luther and Martin Luther King Jr. have in common? A name, obviously. In this game, identify famous people whose full names are found within the names of other celebrities.

Heard in Episode 313: This Birbiglian Life

Ask Me Another
8:49 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Mike Birbiglia: Thank God for Trivia

"[Father Patterson's] not funny, I'm funny. I should be the priest!"
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 10:59 am

He's known for his stand-up comedy, as well as a particular sleepwalking episode, but asked to play a game on...Catholicism? Holy moly! We quiz him on the Bible and more in this VIP challenge.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
8:49 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Insert Coin Here

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 10:59 am

Video game characters lead dangerous lives, so they could use our advice on how to stay out of trouble. Identify classic video games based on some helpful tips — before the ghosts get you!

Heard in Episode 313: This Birbiglian Life

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Ask Me Another
8:49 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Blurred Rhymes

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 2:50 pm

Robin Thicke's 2013 song "Blurred Lines" asks, "What rhymes with hug me?" He should have asked guest musician Julian Velard, who sing reworked lyrical clues that answer the question with some blurred rhymes of their own.

Heard in Episode 313: This Birbiglian Life

Ask Me Another
8:49 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Hello, Goodbye

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 10:59 am

We love to say hello to our final round contestants, but we have to say goodbye to those who can't think up famous salutations and valedictions from film and TV. Think quick before "You're fired!"

Heard in Episode 313: This Birbiglian Life

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Ask Me Another
8:49 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Our Delicious Bodies

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 10:59 am

Cannibalism is gross, but admittedly, ladyfinger cakes are delicious. Try not to get too hungry as you think up various foods, all of which have a human body part in their name.

Heard in Episode 313: This Birbiglian Life

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Ask Me Another
8:49 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Random Questions With: Mike Birbiglia

"I'm gonna take this conversation we're having, and then repeat that to strangers. Then that's the joke. You're the joke, later."
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:44 pm

  • Hear Mike play a game about Catholicism
  • Mike Birbiglia: "No Air Quotes, Man!"

Comedian Mike Birbiglia has a knack for molding his own extremely personal follies into hilarious stories. He's weaved autobiographical tales of his awkward childhood, his love life and medical mishaps into the fabric of his stand-up specials and frequent contributions to The Moth and This American Life.

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Book News: Ted Cruz's Book Advance Said To Eclipse Sarah Palin's

News of Ted Cruz's book deal set off speculation that the Texas Republican may be planning to run for president in 2016.
Drew Angerer Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Thu April 3, 2014

'Empathy Exams' Is A Virtuosic Manifesto Of Human Pain

human heart diagram
iStockphoto

A boyfriend once called Leslie Jamison "a wound dweller." This is one of many personal morsels she shares in her virtuosic book of essays, The Empathy Exams, in which she intrepidly probes sore spots to explore how our reactions to both our own pain and that of others define us as human beings. Jamison notes with concern that ironic detachment has become the fallback in this "post-wounded" age that fears "anything too tender, too touchy-feely." The Empathy Exams presents a brainy but heartfelt case for compassion even at the risk of sentimentality.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Thu April 3, 2014

A Smart Spin On Alternate History In 'The Revolutions'

In his previous novels, Felix Gilman presented fantastic, mind-expanding visions of other worlds. His fifth, The Revolutions, sticks a little closer to home — at least at first. For a change, he's set a book in the real world, albeit a skewed version of it. Gilman reimagines late-19th-century London as a dark and dangerous place; along with all the political, technological, and cultural upheavals of the age, he's added an insidious dimension to the fashionable occultism that gripped the end of the Victorian Era.

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Business
5:07 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Amazon Unveils Fire TV, Its Video Streaming Device

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:53 am

Amazon is making an aggressive move toward your living room TV with a new video-streaming device. Amazon Fire TV joins a crowded field of devices vying for the same spot.

Author Interviews
2:36 am
Thu April 3, 2014

A Song Of Frogs, Motherhood And Murder In Swampy San Francisco

Emma Donoghue's previous novel was Room.
Andrew Bainbridge

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:53 am

In her bestseller Room, writer Emma Donoghue imagined what life would be like for a little boy born into captivity, to a mother who'd been kidnapped and sexually assaulted.

And in her new novel, Frog Music, she's imagined a possible solution to a very real murder, one that took place in California in 1876.

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Author Interviews
3:16 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

The Rise And Fall Of Stefan Zweig, Who Inspired 'Grand Budapest Hotel'

Stefan Zweig was born to a prosperous Jewish family in Vienna. He wrote novels, short stories and biographies.
Keystone/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:54 pm

In Wes Anderson's latest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, a writer relates the long and twisting life story of a hotel owner. It's about youthful love and lifelong obsession, and while the story is original, there's a credit at the end that reads: "Inspired by the Writings of Stefan Zweig."

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The Picture Show
3:16 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Scenes And Sorrows: A Portrait Of Weeping Mary

Courtesy of O. Rufus Lovett

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:54 pm

Texas is full of memorable town names — Blanket, Stagecoach, Domino and Paint Rock, to list just a few. Each has at least one tale behind it, and All Things Considered host Melissa Block has been telling some of them as part of the series Deep In the Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas.

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Kitchen Window
7:26 am
Wed April 2, 2014

How To Get To Sesame Treats: Open A Can Of Tahini

Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:29 am

If you were going to make a desert-island list for your refrigerator, it's unlikely tahini would make the cut. In fact, it might not even be in your standard mainland refrigerator, unless you regularly cook food with a Middle Eastern or hippie influence. Which is a bit of a shame. Because tahini is quite lovely, and capable of much more than we usually give it credit for.

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The Two-Way
6:47 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Book News: 'Socks, I've Worn A Few?' Flea Is Writing A Memoir

Flea, bassist for the Red Hot Chili Peppers, during the group's performance at this year's Super Bowl. He's going to write a memoir.
Rob Carr Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Wed April 2, 2014

With Poetic Intensity, Kevin Powers Tackles The Terror Of War

iStockphoto

"I am home and whole, so to speak," writes Kevin Powers in his debut poetry collection. "But I can't remember / how to be alive." At its most striking, Letter Composed During a Lull in the Fighting finds Powers — an Iraq veteran and the author of the acclaimed war novel The Yellow Birds — contending with conflicts endemic to the home front, struggling to "remember how to be alive" after having known so much death.

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