Arts

My Big Break
11:41 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Without Life-Saving Pact, This Doctor Would Have Been The Patient

Dr. Sampson Davis is an emergency medicine physician in Newark, N.J. When he was 17, he committed a robbery that led to his big break. He's written about his return to the hospital where he was born in his memoir, Living and Dying in Brick City.
Rainer Hosch Courtesy of Sampson Davis

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:23 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Dr. Sampson Davis is an emergency medicine physician in his hometown of Newark, N.J. He grew up in a rough neighborhood. As a kid, he excelled in school but didn't always stay out of trouble.

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Movies
8:31 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Artist Ralph Steadman: A Nice Man, For A Pictorial Assassin

Steadman's drawing of Hunter S. Thompson's car beset by huge bats illustrated Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas in 1971.
Courtesy of Ralph Steadman/Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Ralph Steadman is known to most Americans for the surreal illustrations he drew to accompany Hunter S. Thompson's articles and books, including Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

But Steadman has drawn everything from extinct birds to savage political caricatures to wine and beer labels. He's even written an opera libretto.

The British artist is also the subject of a documentary, titled For No Good Reason, narrated by Johnny Depp.

Such A Nice Man, Such Dangerous Drawings

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Afghanistan
7:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Ancient Form Of Poetry Captures Afghan Women's Lives

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Eliza Griswold has reported from Afghanistan for more than a decade, writing news features for the New York Times magazine and other publications. She thought she had a pretty good grip on the country's politics and culture, but it wasn't until she started exploring Afghan women's poetry that she discovered a different side of women's lives there. What she found was a complex world of rage, empowerment, sorrow and sex.

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Games & Humor
7:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

To Guess A Poker Hand, Look At How It's Held

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 11:44 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Let's talk poker. Dealer, let me see those cards.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "COOL HAND LUKE")

WAYNE ROGERS: (As Gambler) King three. You got a four. Queen deuce gets a five, and a pair of sevens gets a john, and the big ace gets slap in the face. OK, you still do the talking.

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Author Interviews
7:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Wise Words From Robin Roberts' Mom: 'Honey, Everybody's Got Something'

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 10:27 am

When Good Morning America co-anchor Robin Roberts was a little girl, whenever she'd complain to her mother about how unfair life was, her mother would say, "Oh, everybody's got something."

Years later, in 2007, Roberts was diagnosed with breast cancer. "I had that moment of: Wow, I can't believe I'm going through this. Why is this happening to me?" she tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "And my mother ... sweetly and gently — said to me, 'Honey, everybody's got something.' And it just really stuck with me."

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Arts & Life
7:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Like So Many Magazines, 'Ladies' Home Journal' Cuts Back

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Ladies' Home Journal, the magazine that was once so popular with housewives and homemakers, is ending its 130-year run as a monthly magazine. The print magazine business has of course changed dramatically in the last few decades.

And Ladies' Home Journal saw its own advertising revenues drop by more than 50 percent over the last 10 years. But this story isn't just about business as you might expect. NPR's Zoe Chace explains women have changed too.

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Sunday Puzzle
7:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

First In, Last Out

NPR

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

On-air challenge: For each word provided, give a word that can follow it to complete a familiar two-word phrase. The first two letters of the provided word should be the last two letters of the answer. Example: Red Square

Last week's challenge: Name certain trees. Also name something that trees have. Rearrange all the letters to get the brand name of a product you might buy at a grocery or drug store. What is it?

Answer: Firs + Leaves = Life Savers

Winner: Nils Thingvall of Lafayette, Colo.

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My Guilty Pleasure
6:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Kim Harrison's 'Hollows': The Good, The Bad And The Badass

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 11:48 am

When my friend Margo suggested I read Kim Harrison's Dead Witch Walking, I was skeptical. Many were the conversations we'd had about the annoyance of fluffy modern-day vampires and the growing skeeze-factor of what got marketed as Urban Fantasy. But her recommendation carried a lot of weight, so on a quiet day in the independent bookstore where I worked, I sat down and entered Harrison's Hollows series.

Reader, I was hooked faster than a pixy caught in sticky silk.

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Book News & Features
4:44 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Put Up Your Dukes: Romance's Favorite Rank

Ever wonder why two-thirds of all the romance novels ever published seem to be about dukes? We do.

Snow White didn't fall in love with one of the dwarves. She fell in love with the prince. But princes are scarce, and the next title of any consequence is that of the duke – which explains a lot about the rows and rows of romance novels with the word "duke" somewhere on the cover.

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Author Interviews
4:29 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

How An Army Officer And Diplomat Wrote His Way Through Trauma

Ron Capps talks with refugees in the Kisna Reka refugee camp some 15 miles from Pristina, Kosovo, in 1998. In his role as a U.S. diplomatic monitor, Capps traveled through Kosovo gathering intelligence from refugees and Serb forces about the situation in the region.
Santiago Lyon AP

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 5:25 pm

In five wars over 10 years, Ron Capps shifted back and forth between being a U.S. Army officer and a State Department foreign service officer in some of the world's deadliest places.

In Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere, he served as a senior military intelligence officer. In wartime Kosovo, Darfur and Rwanda, he worked as a diplomat out in the field, documenting violence and war. As he writes in his new memoir, all the while he was almost daily "in the midst of murder, rape, the burning of villages, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ethnic cleaning or genocide."

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Book Reviews
4:29 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

In 'Every Day Is For The Thief,' Cole Chronicles A City's Reality

Nnamdi Azikiwe street, a commercial street in Lagos, Nigeria, Tuesday, 24 2005.
GEORGE OSODI ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 6:12 pm

If you've ever received one of those emails claiming to be from someone in Nigeria, and telling you that millions of dollars await you, it may have been sent from an Internet cafe, the kind that proliferate in Lagos, Nigeria. There, under a sign warning patrons not to engage in fraud, people might sit typing emails that make outrageously fraudulent claims. Guards might be stationed in the cafe, and when they notice suspicious activity, they swoop down upon the offending patron, perhaps threatening him with torture and prison, and shaking him down for money.

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The Two-Way
10:48 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Letter Written Aboard Titanic On Fateful Last Day Sells For $200,000

A letter written aboard the Titanic on the day that it sank sold at auction for around $170,000 in England Saturday.
Henry Aldridge & Son

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 1:53 pm

It has been 102 years since it was written aboard the Titanic, describing a pleasant Sunday spent on the cruise ship headed for disaster. The letter fetched 119,000 pounds (about $200,000) at auction in England Saturday, surpassing expectations by $30,000.

"Well, the sailors say we have had a wonderful passage up to now," the letter from a passenger to her mother reads. "There has been no tempest, but God knows what it must be when there is one."

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Author Interviews
8:28 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Justice Stevens: Six Little Ways To Change The Constitution

In a new book, former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens says we should rewrite the Second Amendment, abolish the death penalty and restrict political campaign spending.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 10:30 am

Just a few words can hold a world of meaning. John Paul Stevens, the retired Supreme Court justice, has written a short new book in which he proposes a few words here and there that would create some sweeping changes.

The book, Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution, details the half-dozen ways Stevens thinks the Constitution could be improved, changes that he says are worth the trouble of the arduous amendment process.

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Krulwich Wonders...
7:03 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Come Dance With Me

Urban Dance Camp YouTube

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 11:34 am

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Author Interviews
6:51 am
Sat April 26, 2014

A Pixie Explores Vintage Porn In 'The Good Inn'

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 10:30 am

He was born Charles Thompson — but you might know him as Black Francis, frontman for legendary alternative band the Pixies. And though he still tours with the Pixies, he's trying his hand at a new art form: he's co-authored an illustrated novel, called The Good Inn.

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Author Interviews
6:51 am
Sat April 26, 2014

A Fire Sparks Rivalry And Suspicion In 'The Art Of Secrets'

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 10:30 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Saba Khan is a high school sophomore whose life is turned upside down in a flash - a mysterious fire that destroys her family's apartment on the North Side of Chicago. The Khans are Americans of Pakistani descent. Were they victims of a hate crime? Saba's high school rallies behind her family.

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Performing Arts
6:51 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Stars Indulge In Versification At Poetry Gala

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 10:30 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The Academy of American Poets held their 80th anniversary gala this week to mark National Poetry Month with an all-star cast reading some of their favorite poems. Sir Patrick Stewart brought a voice that sounds almost from on-high to read Edna St. Vincent Millay's "God's World."

(SOUNDBITE OF POEM, "GOD'S WORLD")

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Performing Arts
6:51 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Jim Gaffigan, Funny And Clean In 'Obsessed'

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 10:30 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Jim Gaffigan's got a lot going on right now. He's been on tour with his wife and five children. He shot the pilot of a TV show about living in his New York apartment with only two bedrooms and he's "Obsessed," the title of his new special that premieres tomorrow on Comedy Central. Between stops on his tour, Jim Gaffigan joined us to explain why he takes aim at Kale and how he does it without using a single foul word.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Sat April 26, 2014

For Binchy Fans, One Last Trip Down 'Chestnut Street'

There may be no real Chestnut Street in Dublin, but Maeve Binchy made readers feel as if it might be around any corner. Best-selling author Binchy, who died in 2012, was famous for novels which intertwined the lives, loves and relationships of her mostly Irish characters with a lyrical, yet accessible writing style. And Chestnut Street, her last book, is a collection of short stories about those characters, loosely connected by their common setting on the titular street

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Code Switch
4:28 am
Sat April 26, 2014

3 Pitfalls To Avoid When Talking About Race

In a recent dissent, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote that "we ought not sit back and wish away, rather than confront, the racial inequality that exists in our society."
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

My first hint that a recent column on diversity in late-night TV had made an impact came when I saw a tweet from an old acquaintance.

He runs a website and blog devoted to covering television and had decided to write a post based on my audio story on late-night TV. He then sent out a Twitter message with the headline:

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:34 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Not My Job: Ballerina Misty Copeland Gets Quizzed On Morris Dancing

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 9:25 am

Ballerina Misty Copeland is one of the greatest dancers performing today; she's a soloist at the American Ballet Theater, and she's accomplished all this despite starting ballet at the age of 13. By that age, most kids who dream of dancing have already given it up and resigned themselves to a career in public radio.

We've invited Copeland to play a game called "Hey Nonny Nonny" — three questions about a form of English folk dancing called Morris dancing, which scholars believe originated one night in the Middle Ages when some guys got really, really drunk.

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Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
4:03 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of April 24, 2014

Heaven Is For Real, about a 4-year-old who sees a vision of heaven during surgery, appears at No. 2.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
4:03 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of April 24, 2014

Sean King and Michelle Maxwell investigate a fallen soldier who may not actually be dead. King and Maxwell appear at No. 11.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
4:03 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of April 24, 2014

In her memoir Living With a Wild God, Barbara Ehrenreich describes the mystical visions she had as a teenager.
Courtesy of Twelve/Hachette Book Group

Barbara Ehrenreich's part-memoir, part-spiritual inquiry, Living With a Wild God, debuts at No. 8.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
4:03 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of April 24, 2014

The Collector, in which a professional house sitter tries to solve the mystery surrounding an apparent murder-suicide, debuts at No. 12.

NPR Bestseller List
4:03 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of April 24, 2014

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

Author Interviews
3:04 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

For Concentration Camp Doctor, A Lifetime Of Eluding Justice

Nazi SS doctor Aribert Heim continued practicing medicine for years after World War II, until his secret concentration camp past returned and he fled to Cairo.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 6:15 pm

Aribert Heim was a Nazi doctor at the Mauthausen concentration camp. He gained notoriety there for operating on healthy patients, often killing them painfully in the process. Heim, however, evaded prosecution after World War II, spending the last 30 years of his life on the run and ultimately dying in Cairo in 1992. Nicholas Kulish, co-author of The Eternal Nazi, tells the story.

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Movie Reviews
2:05 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Feminine, Foreign, And Struggling To Come Of Age

Alex Brendemuehl plays a mysterious doctor, obsessed with perfection and purity, who befriends an Argentine family in The German Doctor.
Samuel Goldwyn Films

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 5:18 pm

Sex and violence mean one thing in Hollywood, quite another overseas. At any rate, it'll seem that way to anyone watching this week's most alarming foreign-language films: Francois Ozon's coming-of-age saga Jeune et Jolie, and the Argentine thriller The German Doctor.

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Movie Reviews
1:05 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

In 'Locke,' A Man's Life Unravels En Route To London

Tom Hardy plays the title character in the British film Locke — in which a man's life unravels in the course of a solo drive from Birmingham to London. He's the only person the audience sees in this film, written and directed by Steven Knight.
A24

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 3:11 pm

Locke is a most unusual film. It might not seem so odd as a radio play or even a stage play. The protagonist, his situation — they're fairly conventional. But to do what Locke does as a movie — that takes daring. The film is set in one space at one time. The arc of action is continuous. There is only one character on screen and just the top third of him, a man in a car, southbound on a motorway toward London. His name is Ivan Locke, he's played by Tom Hardy, and he's upending his life in front of your eyes.

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Barbershop
11:27 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Cliven Bundy, #myNYPD: Public Relations Fails?

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 11:59 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. It's time yet again for our weekly visit to the Barbershop. That's where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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