Arts

Your Money
4:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

In 'Clash Of The Financial Pundits,' Clarity For The Investor?

It's one thing to listen to financial pundits for insight. It's another to act on their advice.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 1:51 pm

Millions of Americans get financial advice from pundits on talk radio and cable television.

Since the 2008 financial crisis, many of those pundits have gotten a bad name for failing to warn investors about the crash. Yet public frustration has done little to hurt the financial media industry as a whole.

In their new book, Clash of the Financial Pundits, Joshua Brown and Jeff Macke argue that financial punditry is not going anywhere; it's been around as long as there have been economies.

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Author Interviews
3:17 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

No One Wants To Be With The Marlboro Man: Terry Crews On 'Manhood'

Terry Crews is a former NFL linebacker and now an actor. Manhood: How to Be a Better Man — or Just Live with One is his first book.
Dimitrios Kambouris Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:45 am

When Hollywood needs a big dude — a really big dude — they can call on all sorts of former athletes. Few come with the heart and humor of Terry Crews.

An 11th-round draft pick of the Rams, Crews gave up his NFL dream in 1997 to pursue a different dream in Hollywood. He thought he'd turn his love of art into a job behind the scenes in special effects. Instead, he has stolen scenes on camera — from action movies like The Expendables to TV comedies like the Golden Globe-winning Brooklyn Nine-Nine.

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Arts & Life
8:11 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Barbara Walters: The Original Peggy Olson

NBC News' Barbara Walters in 1965.
NBC NewsWire/Getty

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 9:20 pm

By the time a bright-eyed secretary named Peggy Olson walked through the fictional doors of the Madison Avenue advertising agency Sterling Cooper in 1960, one very real female pioneer was already hard at work down the street.

Like her Mad Men counterpart, the 84-year-old broadcasting legend Barbara Walters, who retired from television this week, got her start as a secretary for a Manhattan advertising agency. And though Walters' rise from the secretarial pool began much earlier and took much longer than Peggy's, it was no less dramatic.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Oprah Winfrey's Channel Calls Off Michael Sam Series

St. Louis Rams rookie defensive end Michael Sam runs a drill during the team's rookie camp. He won't be followed by Oprah channel cameras for a documentary, as had been planned.
Jeff Roberson AP

Oprah Winfrey's television network was set to follow Michael Sam through rookie camp as he tried to earn a spot on the St. Louis Rams. The docuseries was to follow Sam, the first openly gay NFL player, with a camera team at training camp as well as his personal life — a "historic moment in professional sports," OWN's president told ESPN.

But OWN put the project on indefinite hold Friday to give Sam a chance to work without distraction.

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Author Interviews
6:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

'Wynne's War,' A Modern Take On The Classic 'Mideastern'

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Aaron Gwyn has written a novel about modern man at war on horses. He calls it a mideastern. "Wynne's War" is the story of a U.S. Army Ranger from Okla., Elijah Russell, whose stellar horsemanship gets him assigned to train Green Berets for a special mission in Afghanistan, a horseback raid on the Taliban in treacherous mountain territory.

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Book News & Features
6:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

A Burrito With A Side Of Prose At Chipotle

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Beginning this weekend, you can get a little literature with your burrito. Chipotle is putting short essays on its bags and cups - musing written by writers and thinkers that include Michael Lewis, Toni Morrison, George Saunders and Malcolm Gladwell. The series is headed by Jonathan Safran Foer, the author of the book "Eating Animals." He told Vanity Fair he'd like to create a small pocket of thoughtfulness right in the middle of the busy day.

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Movie Interviews
6:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Director Bendjelloul Searched For Mysterious 'Sugar Man'

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This week, Malik Bendejelloul, who won the 2013 Oscar for his film "Searching for Sugar Man," was found dead in Stockholm. The cause of death is unknown, though his brother told the Guardian newspaper that Malik Bendejelloul took his own life after a struggle with depression.

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Author Interviews
6:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Mark Twain's Famous Outcasts Float Through Three Centuries

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Book Reviews
4:38 am
Sat May 17, 2014

The 'Wayward And Defiant' Life Of Journalist Rebecca West

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:38 am

"There is no such thing as conversation," wrote Rebecca West in her story "The Harsh Voice." "It is an illusion. There are intersecting monologues, that is all." The same could be said for books, as well — even the best histories and biographies are necessarily filtered through the sensibilities of the author and reader, and some of the best literature is the result of those monologues, those stories, intersecting.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:19 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Not My Job: Political Adviser John Podesta Gets Quizzed On A Swedish King

Eric Jamison AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:37 am

John Podesta has very possibly spent more time in the West Wing than that bust of Winston Churchill. He was chief of staff to former President Bill Clinton during the impeachment saga and is now counselor to President Obama.

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This Week's Must Read
4:41 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

A 'New York Times' Shake-Up, But Not The One You're Thinking Of

Taxis speed past the headquarters of the New York Times.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:51 am

It's not all that often that the New York Times goes from printing the biggest stories of the day to actually being the biggest story of the day. But that's exactly what happened this week when the publisher, Arthur Sulzberger Jr. replaced Jill Abramson as the executive editor.

The Times has dealt with big problems before. I'm thinking of course about about Jayson Blair. Seth Mnookin's book, Hard News, is the definitive account of that saga. It's the story of an old line institution that allowed a snake to slip through unnoticed.

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Fine Art
3:01 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Artist Kara Walker Draws Us Into Bitter History With Something Sweet

Viewers of Kara Walker's A Subtlety described the sculpture as "beautiful" and "the American sphinx." Another said, "She is so exposed and she's so vulnerable, but at the same time she has some grace and majesticness that is completely unapproachable."
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:00 pm

Kara Walker was barely out of art school when she won a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant, in 1997. Back then, her early work shocked audiences in part because her murals looked so charming from a distance. Black paper shadow portraits of colonial figures seemed to dance on white gallery walls; but lean in and you'd find your nose pressed up against images of slavery's horrors — mammies, masters, lynchings and sexual violence.

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The Salt
1:01 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Introducing Roma Cuisine, The Little-Known 'Soul Food' Of Europe

The decor at Romani Kafenava offers some local culture.
Courtesy of Epeka

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 2:11 pm

It's no secret that tensions surrounding the Roma people in Europe are running high these days.

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Arts
12:44 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Bedrock 66 Motel Mirrors 5/23

Motel Mirrors

The next Bedrock 66 Live! performance will be Friday, May 23 at Donnie's Homespun, 107 W. Cook in Springfield. Amy LaVere and John Paul Keith will perform songs from their recent EP Motel Mirrors along with songs from their solo records.  Joining Amy and JPK will be the southern Illinois rockabilly group the Swamp Tigers. Show time is 8 pm and $12 advance tickets are available at www.bedrock66.com.

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Monkey See
12:13 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

This Fall, TV Looks Much More Diverse: Now Don't Screw It Up

ABC's How To Get Away With Murder stars Oscar nominee Viola Davis.
Craig Sjodin ABC

For those of us who have spent time arguing for increased ethnic and cultural diversity on television, the last seven days have felt like a fantasy fever dream.

This week, the big broadcast networks announced their schedules for the 2014-15 TV season during the industry's "upfront" presentations to advertisers. And there are 10 new series featuring non-white characters and/or show creators – numbers we haven't seen since the days when everybody was trying to clone The Cosby Show.

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Africa
11:11 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Wole Soyinka: I Just Want Those Monsters Exterminated

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:05 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. My thanks to Celeste Headlee for sitting in for me while I was away. And at the end of the program today, actually, I will have a word about her exciting new venture.

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Barbershop
11:11 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Is It Donald Sterling's Right To Fight For His Team?

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:05 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Movie Reviews
11:04 am
Fri May 16, 2014

'Godzilla': A Fire-Breathing Behemoth Returns To The Big Screen

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 2:41 pm

Transcript

DAVIE DAVIES, HOST:

Since 1954, the fire-breathing behemoth Godzilla has had many incarnations. In the Japanese original he was a thinly disguised symbol of the atom bomb but in later films he would fight other giant monsters and even space aliens. In 1998 there was a poorly received American remake by Roland Emmerich. Now comes another American version at a time when the restored original is also in theaters and available on DVD.

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Monkey See
10:23 am
Fri May 16, 2014

First Novels: The Weird, Thrilling Trip Through A Very Narrow Door

iStockphoto.com

To gauge the practicality of investing the long years of speculative writing that it takes to produce a first novel, I asked my agent, Kate Garrick of DeFiore & Company, to estimate the percentage of the first novels submitted to her she considers saleable. Her answer (like all these answers, via e-mail):

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Monkey See
8:00 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Fairy Tales And A Fall TV Quiz

A drawing of a snoozing Sleeping Beauty.
iStockphoto.com
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

We could not be happier to bring back our friend Barrie Hardymon, who's out in California but still made time to come and chat with us. In recognition that we are soon to see the live-action Maleficent coming from Disney, we chat about fairy tales. "These are stories we tell our kids to get them to abandon us," Glen says. "We're giving them the psychic armor, the psychic tools, to say goodbye." We talk about old fairy tales, Disney-fied versions, and Glen's recognition that Germany hasn't had an easy time of it with their own versions.

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The Two-Way
6:28 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Book News: If Jesus Dictates A Book To You, Who Holds The Copyright?

A seagull flies over a statue of Jesus on the top of St. Peter"s Basilica in Rome.
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Movie Reviews
4:19 am
Fri May 16, 2014

'Million Dollar Arm' Delivers Ball-Park Size Enjoyment

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 11:07 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Next on this Friday morning, our film critic Kenneth Turan has this pitch for a baseball movie.

KENNETH TURAN, BYLINE: You can see the stuff "Million Dollar Arm" throws at you from miles away, but that doesn't stop it from being genially enjoyable. It's an example of the pleasant things that happen when a better class of people work on Disney family films.

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All Tech Considered
2:41 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Are Filmmakers Using Drones Illegally? Looks Like It

Jeff Blank, of Los Angeles-based Drone Dudes, prepares a quadcopter for takeoff. The drone has to chase a motorcycle down a hill.
Aarti Shahani NPR

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:11 am

It is illegal in the U.S. to operate a drone for cash. That's the position of the Federal Aviation Administration — which is in charge of protecting air space. But at least one industry has decided that it doesn't care and it's going to put drones to work anyway: the film industry.

Drone Startups Hit Hollywood

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Media
2:35 am
Fri May 16, 2014

'I've Enjoyed Every Minute Of It': Carl Kasell On His 60 Years In Radio

NPR's Carl Kasell delivers one of his last newscasts during Morning Edition on Dec. 30, 2009, in Washington, D.C.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 1:06 pm

Carl Kasell — the official judge and scorekeeper of the NPR quiz show Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! — is stepping down after more than 60 years in radio. While you'll still hear him from time to time as he eases into the role as scorekeeper emeritus, his final broadcast airs on Saturday and Sunday.

Kasell recently had a cameo on The Simpsons, and since that's the pinnacle of any career, this seemed like a good moment to look back on his many decades in broadcast.

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Movie Reviews
4:04 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

In 'Horses Of God,' A Sprawling Slum Breeds A Violent Act

Said El Alami and Achraf Afir in Horses Of God.
Kino Lorber

Anyone seeking to establish an incubator for suicide bombers could hardly improve on Sidi Moumen, a slum on the fringe of Casablanca. As depicted in Horses of God, the neighborhood is a place of crushing poverty, rampant hostility and exceptionally limited options.

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Movie Reviews
4:04 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

From The Traditions Of Melodrama, A Woman Of Resolve

Marion Cotillard stars in The Immigrant.
Anne Joyce The Weinstein Company

I teach in a film school, and if there's one genre I find it hard to get students on board for, it's classic melodrama. Perhaps because they've been reared on distancing irony and the suspension of belief, they misread the symphonies of pent-up emotion, the passionate address to questions of good and evil, of class, gender and race as phony.

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Movie Reviews
4:04 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

'Million Dollar Arm' Is A Sales Pitch In Search Of Stillness

Aasif Mandvi (left) and Jon Hamm check out the talent in Million Dollar Arm.
Ron Phillips Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 2:55 pm

Where does Don Draper's formidable presence come from in Mad Men? From his impeccable style, sure, and from his brooding good looks, of course, but also from his stillness. A few drug-induced exceptions aside, Don is as restrained in movement as he is in his speech. The combination gives him an irresistible, if unsettling, allure; in meetings, it's his solid stare that holds your attention as much as his words.

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Movie Reviews
4:04 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

'Godzilla' Brings The Spectacle Without Obscuring The Big Guy's Dark Past

Godzilla. You know, from Godzilla.
Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 11:50 am

This is a monster sold on a sigh. For all of the bombast, the buildings falling, and the brawling beasties, the moment when this Godzilla is most impressive, the moment he suddenly transcends his digital underpinnings and feels like a real presence, is one of his subtlest and quietest. During a lull in a battle among the skyscrapers of downtown San Francisco, the danger around him briefly subsides; his head droops momentarily, his body heaves ever so slightly downward, and he exhales quietly.

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Book Reviews
3:59 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

In Mona Simpson's 'Casebook,' A Holden Caulfield For Our Time

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 11:18 am

When I was a kid, I spent a lot of summer days lying flat on my back in the front yard. I would stare up at the sky and think: "This is me, thinking." And then I'd think, "This is me, thinking about thinking." At that point, having made myself dizzy, I'd jump up and return to a less abstruse activity like riding my bike or tormenting my little sister.

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War On Poverty, 50 Years Later
3:05 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

In Pricey Cities, Being A Bohemian Starving Artist Gets Old Fast

Rolando Villazon and Alexia Voulgaridou star as Rodolfo and Mimi in a June 2001 production of Giacomo Puccini's opera La Boheme. Some real-life artists say the story cuts a little close to home.
Arno Balzarini AP

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 7:18 pm

There are very few professions where poverty is romanticized, but if you're a Franciscan friar or an artist, being poor is seen as somehow ennobling. Josh Shaw, who ran a recent Pacific Opera Project production of La Boheme in Los Angeles, says the opera's famous story of starving artists hits a little close to home.

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