Arts

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
10:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of May 15, 2014

Anthony Doerr's All The Light We Cannot See follows a blind French girl and a young German private during World War II. It debuts at No. 2.

NPR Bestseller List
10:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of May 15, 2014

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
10:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of May 15, 2014

At No. 8, Dan Jones' The Plantagenets explores the royal dynasty that preceded the Tudors.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
10:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of May 15, 2014

In The Longest Ride, Nicholas Sparks tells the story of a widower who befriends a young college student and her cowboy boyfriend. It appears at No. 9.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
10:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of May 15, 2014

One of notorious Cleveland kidnapper Ariel Castro's three victims shares the details of her abduction in Finding Me. It debuts at No. 10.

The Two-Way
9:00 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Gordon Willis, Cinematographer Who Gave Woody Allen Films Their Look, Dies

Cinematographer Gordon Willis poses with his honorary Oscar following a 2009 ceremony in Los Angeles.
Chris Pizzello AP

Gordon Willis, the cinematographer behind such classic 1970s films as Annie Hall, Klute, All the President's Men and the Godfather series, died on Sunday. He was 82.

"One cinematographer had established a kind of noir color look, rich in brown, amber and shadow, that was a vital force in the noir movies made in Hollywood in the 1970s," film historian David Thomson wrote of Willis in his New Biographical Dictionary of Film.

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The Two-Way
6:35 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Book News: Novel Mocking Literary Prizes Wins Literary Prize

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

What We Learned From The Best Commencement Speeches Ever

Conan O'Brien's 2011 commencement address at Dartmouth College was one of those speeches that was so good it drew news coverage.
Jason R. Henske AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 7:32 am

Something funny has happened to the familiar commencement address in the past 10 years. That something is YouTube. Steve Jobs' 2005 address at Stanford, to take just one example, has been viewed upwards of 20 million times.

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Business
4:11 am
Mon May 19, 2014

AT&T To Buy DirecTV In Nearly $50 Billion Deal

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good Morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

If you've streamed a movie or a TV show recently, you are part of the problem facing cable and satellite providers. These companies are facing more and more competition from Internet streaming, and to survive, some are consolidating.

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Author Interviews
2:22 am
Mon May 19, 2014

If You Want To Teach Kids History, Try Grossing Them Out First

In her new book Bugged, Sarah Albee explores history through the lens of insects β€” including how they spread disease, how they influence conflicts, and how they can be a tasty snack.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:46 am

How would a man in a suit of armor go to the bathroom? That inquiry into medieval sanitation is just one of many unlikely topics that have come up around Sarah Albee's dinner table. Albee, a children's book author, has been trying to get middle schoolers interested in history. Her strategy is to look at it through the lens of something that gets kids' attention, namely: things that are gross.

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My Big Break
4:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

A Big Break Realized Amid Fluorescent Lights and Slurpee Machines

Before his big break, Terry Boring worked as an assistant manager at a convenience store in Pittsburgh.
Jessica Ferringer Courtesy of Terry Boring

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:44 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

It all started with a dead-end job at a convenience store in Pittsburgh. Terry Boring says he had the worst job there: the assistant manager.

"You get none of the respect of the store manager and you get all of the terrible hours that they can't get anyone else to work," he says.

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Author Interviews
3:41 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Revolution, Fatherhood And 5 Years In The Middle East

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 7:54 am

In 2008, Nathan Deuel and his wife packed up their things and moved to Saudi Arabia. That country, famous for being largely closed to Westerners, was newly open to a handful of journalists. The couple moved to Riyadh. A year later, in 2009, their daughter was born.

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Movie Interviews
3:37 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

What's In A Roar? Crafting Godzilla's Iconic Sound

Godzilla's original 1954 roar was created by composer Akira Ifukube, who dragged a resin-coated leather glove along the loosened strings of a double bass.
Toho

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:47 am

Godzilla roared to No. 1 at the box office on opening weekend. The latest reboot of the sci-fi blockbuster brings a new take on the monster's iconic roar to the silver screen.

Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl designed the sound for the new movie.

"I think that the Godzilla roar probably tops the King Kong roar in terms of iconic-ness," Van der Ryn says.

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Author Interviews
6:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Putting A Face Behind The 'Sting Of The Drone'

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 10:24 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Few people know the ins and outs of power politics in the nation's capital better than Richard A. Clarke. He served three presidents and as national coordinator for security and counterterrorism, he was instrumental in developing the nation's armed drone program.

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Business
6:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

New Initiative Aims To Encourage Diversity In Kids' Publishing

First Book CEO Kyle Zimmer says her data shows children read more enthusiastically when they see themselves reflected in their books.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 10:24 am

The lack of diversity in children's literature is nothing new – it's an issue that's been roiling the book world for years. Just in the past few weeks, it's come to a head with the We Need Diverse Books campaign on Twitter and Tumblr. Everyone agrees: all kinds of kids need to be able to see themselves reflected in the books they read.

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Author Interviews
6:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Novel Humanizes The 'Hyena Of The Gestapo'

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 8:47 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Francine Prose's new novel "Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932" was inspired by a picture taken by the famous Hungarian photographer Brassai. It shows a lesbian couple at a club in Paris before World War II. One of the women in the photo is dressed in a tuxedo. Her hair is short and slicked back like a man. She was Violette Morris, an athlete and racecar driver whose career was cut short because she was a cross-dresser.

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You Must Read This
4:29 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Cat Bite Takes A Dramatic Chunk Out Of These 'Desperate Characters'

Every so often, I read a novel and I experience all the clichΓ©s: my heart leaps into my throat, my pulse races, I'm stunned speechless. All this tawdry emotion occurs when I read sentences like this:

"He wasn't a seducer. He was remote. He was like a man preceded into a room by acrobats."

Or this:

"Now it was like the labored conversation among guests at a late hour after there is nothing more to say, nothing but ashes in the fireplace, dishes in the sink, a chill in the room, a return to ordinary estrangement."

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Music News
4:29 am
Sun May 18, 2014

How Do You Wring Sound From Sculpture? It Takes A 'Quiet Pride'

Rufus Reid has played with just about everybody in the mainstream jazz world. His latest project, Quiet Pride, is based on works by the late sculptor and civil rights activist Elizabeth Catlett.
Jimmy Katz Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 10:24 am

Bassist and composer Rufus Reid has been playing jazz for half a century. He's worked with just about everyone, from saxophonists Dexter Gordon and Stan Getz to singer Nancy Wilson and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie.

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Arts & Life
4:09 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Shifting Images: Cleaning Up Amsterdam And Controversial Art

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:06 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

It is time for The New and The Next.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

VIGELAND: Eugene Robinson is the deputy editor of the online magazine Ozy. And he's filling in for Carlos Watson this week as we talk about what's new and what's next. Welcome back, Eugene.

EUGENE WATSON: Hey, thanks for having me, Tess.

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Your Money
4:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

In 'Clash Of The Financial Pundits,' Clarity For The Investor?

It's one thing to listen to financial pundits for insight. It's another to act on their advice.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 1:51 pm

Millions of Americans get financial advice from pundits on talk radio and cable television.

Since the 2008 financial crisis, many of those pundits have gotten a bad name for failing to warn investors about the crash. Yet public frustration has done little to hurt the financial media industry as a whole.

In their new book, Clash of the Financial Pundits, Joshua Brown and Jeff Macke argue that financial punditry is not going anywhere; it's been around as long as there have been economies.

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Author Interviews
3:17 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

No One Wants To Be With The Marlboro Man: Terry Crews On 'Manhood'

Terry Crews is a former NFL linebacker and now an actor. Manhood: How to Be a Better Man β€” or Just Live with One is his first book.
Dimitrios Kambouris Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:45 am

When Hollywood needs a big dude β€” a really big dude β€” they can call on all sorts of former athletes. Few come with the heart and humor of Terry Crews.

An 11th-round draft pick of the Rams, Crews gave up his NFL dream in 1997 to pursue a different dream in Hollywood. He thought he'd turn his love of art into a job behind the scenes in special effects. Instead, he has stolen scenes on camera β€” from action movies like The Expendables to TV comedies like the Golden Globe-winning Brooklyn Nine-Nine.

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Arts & Life
8:11 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Barbara Walters: The Original Peggy Olson

NBC News' Barbara Walters in 1965.
NBC NewsWire/Getty

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 9:20 pm

By the time a bright-eyed secretary named Peggy Olson walked through the fictional doors of the Madison Avenue advertising agency Sterling Cooper in 1960, one very real female pioneer was already hard at work down the street.

Like her Mad Men counterpart, the 84-year-old broadcasting legend Barbara Walters, who retired from television this week, got her start as a secretary for a Manhattan advertising agency. And though Walters' rise from the secretarial pool began much earlier and took much longer than Peggy's, it was no less dramatic.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Oprah Winfrey's Channel Calls Off Michael Sam Series

St. Louis Rams rookie defensive end Michael Sam runs a drill during the team's rookie camp. He won't be followed by Oprah channel cameras for a documentary, as had been planned.
Jeff Roberson AP

Oprah Winfrey's television network was set to follow Michael Sam through rookie camp as he tried to earn a spot on the St. Louis Rams. The docuseries was to follow Sam, the first openly gay NFL player, with a camera team at training camp as well as his personal life β€” a "historic moment in professional sports," OWN's president told ESPN.

But OWN put the project on indefinite hold Friday to give Sam a chance to work without distraction.

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Author Interviews
6:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

'Wynne's War,' A Modern Take On The Classic 'Mideastern'

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Aaron Gwyn has written a novel about modern man at war on horses. He calls it a mideastern. "Wynne's War" is the story of a U.S. Army Ranger from Okla., Elijah Russell, whose stellar horsemanship gets him assigned to train Green Berets for a special mission in Afghanistan, a horseback raid on the Taliban in treacherous mountain territory.

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Book News & Features
6:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

A Burrito With A Side Of Prose At Chipotle

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Beginning this weekend, you can get a little literature with your burrito. Chipotle is putting short essays on its bags and cups - musing written by writers and thinkers that include Michael Lewis, Toni Morrison, George Saunders and Malcolm Gladwell. The series is headed by Jonathan Safran Foer, the author of the book "Eating Animals." He told Vanity Fair he'd like to create a small pocket of thoughtfulness right in the middle of the busy day.

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Movie Interviews
6:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Director Bendjelloul Searched For Mysterious 'Sugar Man'

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This week, Malik Bendejelloul, who won the 2013 Oscar for his film "Searching for Sugar Man," was found dead in Stockholm. The cause of death is unknown, though his brother told the Guardian newspaper that Malik Bendejelloul took his own life after a struggle with depression.

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Author Interviews
6:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Mark Twain's Famous Outcasts Float Through Three Centuries

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Book Reviews
4:38 am
Sat May 17, 2014

The 'Wayward And Defiant' Life Of Journalist Rebecca West

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:38 am

"There is no such thing as conversation," wrote Rebecca West in her story "The Harsh Voice." "It is an illusion. There are intersecting monologues, that is all." The same could be said for books, as well β€” even the best histories and biographies are necessarily filtered through the sensibilities of the author and reader, and some of the best literature is the result of those monologues, those stories, intersecting.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:19 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Not My Job: Political Adviser John Podesta Gets Quizzed On A Swedish King

Eric Jamison AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:37 am

John Podesta has very possibly spent more time in the West Wing than that bust of Winston Churchill. He was chief of staff to former President Bill Clinton during the impeachment saga and is now counselor to President Obama.

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This Week's Must Read
4:41 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

A 'New York Times' Shake-Up, But Not The One You're Thinking Of

Taxis speed past the headquarters of the New York Times.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:51 am

It's not all that often that the New York Times goes from printing the biggest stories of the day to actually being the biggest story of the day. But that's exactly what happened this week when the publisher, Arthur Sulzberger Jr. replaced Jill Abramson as the executive editor.

The Times has dealt with big problems before. I'm thinking of course about about Jayson Blair. Seth Mnookin's book, Hard News, is the definitive account of that saga. It's the story of an old line institution that allowed a snake to slip through unnoticed.

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