Arts

Sunday Puzzle
7:02 am
Sun February 9, 2014

Break Loose, Break Loose, Kick Off Your Sunday Shoes

NPR

Originally published on Sun February 9, 2014 10:44 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is called "Break Loose." Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase in which the first word has a long-A vowel sound (as in "break"), and the second word has a long-U vowel sound (as in "loose").

Last week's challenge: The challenge came from listener Sam Williamson of Charlevoix, MI, and it's a two-part question: where in most homes will you see the words SHE and HIS ... and what word will you see right after HIS?

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Author Interviews
7:00 am
Sun February 9, 2014

Seed Librarians, Stone Carvers And Sheepherders Along The Hudson

Originally published on Sun February 9, 2014 10:44 am

Travel can take on many modes: Air, bus, boat, car — and how about going a few hundred miles by bicycle?

One day in the spring of 2012, English designer and photographer Nick Hand set off on his bicycle from Brooklyn, New York, and traveled north up the Hudson River, collecting the stories of local artisans he happened to meet along the way.

Hand put all those stories together in a new book called Conversations on the Hudson, and he tells NPR's Rachel Martin that he found inspiration in a similar journey he'd already taken around the British coastline.

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Author Interviews
7:00 am
Sun February 9, 2014

A Vietnamese Pioneer, Modeled On An American Legend

Originally published on Sun February 9, 2014 10:44 am

Pioneer Girl is the story of a young woman whose brother has disappeared. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with author Bich Minh Nguyen about the novel, and its connection to the writer Laura Ingalls Wilder.

You Must Read This
6:02 am
Sun February 9, 2014

From Muse To Outcast, A Woman Comes Of Age In 'Widow Basquiat'

Rebecca Walker's previous work includes the memoirs Black, White & Jewish and Baby Love. Adé: A Love Story is her first novel.
Amanda Marsalis Courtesy of Little A / New Harvest

Much has been written about Jean-Michel Basquiat, the childlike savant and startlingly brilliant neo-expressionist who went down in a ball of heroin, cocaine and rage before his prime — before he could see his paintings sell at Christie's for $49 million, before he was compared to Picasso and de Kooning. Since his death in 1988, he has been immortalized in countless museum catalogues and even more Ph.D theses, and rendered larger than life on the silver screen by none other than the king of the eighties art world himself, Julian Schnabel.

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Arts & Life
4:09 pm
Sat February 8, 2014

People, Language And Controversy In The Headlines

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 5:34 pm

Writer and comedian Hari Kondabolu speaks with NPR's Arun Rath about India being excluded from the Olympics, a controversial Coke commercial, and comments from Sen. Pat Roberts from Kansas during the confirmation hearings for surgeon general nominee Dr. Vivek Murthy.

Books
4:09 pm
Sat February 8, 2014

Lessons On Addiction And Escaping The 'Death Grip From Satan'

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 5:34 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman died last weekend from an apparent heroin overdose. Since then, many of his fans have been trying to make sense of it. Slate senior editor Emily Bazelon turned to the work of a journalist who investigated his own effort to escape what he calls the death grip from Satan. Bazelon recommends David Carr's "The Night of the Gun."

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Author Interviews
4:09 pm
Sat February 8, 2014

In 'Poetry,' The Story Of An African-American Military Family

Courtesy of Penguin Group

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 5:34 pm

Marilyn Nelson is one of America's most celebrated poets. She is a three-time finalist for the National Book Award, winner of the Newbery and Printz and Coretta Scott King awards. Many of her most famous collections are for children.

Her latest work, How I Discovered Poetry, is a memoir about her own childhood. It's a series of 50 poems about growing up, traveling all over America in the 1950s to follow her father's job in the Air Force. Each of the poems is identified with a place and a date.

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The New And The Next
4:09 pm
Sat February 8, 2014

Blowing Away The Limits Of Convention

Courtesy Ozy.com

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 5:34 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest feature stories.

This week, Watson talks with host Arun Rath about a Tunisian inventor with a new design for wind turbines and why HBO's True Detective is so "seductive." They also discuss how Square, a device that enables smartphones and tablets to easily process credit cards, is changing the way people tip.

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All Tech Considered
12:41 pm
Sat February 8, 2014

Broken Age's Adventure Started Long Before Pressing Start

Vella (left) and Shay (right) are the main characters of Broken Age: Act I, a game funded through Kickstarter.
Double Fine Productions

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 4:46 pm

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History
9:16 am
Sat February 8, 2014

Memento Of A Lost Childhood: Anne Frank's Marbles

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 11:05 am

Before her family went into hiding, Anne Frank gave away some of her toys to her neighbor, Toosje Kupers. The gift included a set of marbles, now on display at at an art gallery in Rotterdam. NPR's Scott Simon takes a moment to note the childhood gift.

Pop Culture
9:16 am
Sat February 8, 2014

For Top-Flight Animators, The Gag Is An Art All Its Own

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 11:05 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The Lego Movie opened last night in theaters across the country. It's latest example of the magic of animation, filmmakers who bring plastic to life, make animals talk and send toys singing and dancing across a big screen. But animators also love to hurl our most beloved characters over cliffs. They blow them up with dynamite, flatten them with speeding trains. Seconds later, they pop back up and dust themselves off.

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Monkey See
5:44 am
Sat February 8, 2014

Jimmy Fallon Exits Stage (Just) Right

Jimmy Fallon hosts Late Night with Jimmy Fallon at Rockefeller Center on Jan. 28 in New York City. He'll be moving on to host The Tonight Show.
Jamie McCarthy Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 12:36 pm

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Author Interviews
5:05 am
Sat February 8, 2014

Genre-Bending Novel Uses Body Swap As A Metaphor For Reading

Originally published on Sun February 9, 2014 10:08 am

Marcel Theroux's Strange Bodies is about Nicholas Slopen's return to life, the 18th-century lexicographer Samuel Johnson and dead people inhabiting new bodies. As Slopen is cautioned, "the truth of this situation is much stranger and more complex than you can imagine."

Theroux, whose previous novel, Far North, was a National Book Award finalist, is also a filmmaker. He joins NPR's Scott Simon to talk about his genre-bending new novel and the thin lines that separate real life and science fiction.

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Monkey See
11:06 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Navigating Kitsch and Controversy At The Opening Ceremonies

Dancers perform Dove of Peace during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics.
Martin Rose Getty Images

One hopes, at an event of nebulous actual significance like the opening ceremonies of any Olympics, for a single moment that can tease out the specific weirdness of that event. You need something, some nut, some bit, that can demonstrate to people in a single flash what it was like for a bunch of people to pay attention to something even though arguably nothing happened.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:58 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Not My Job: An American Music Historian Gets Quizzed On K-Pop

Molly Corfman AP

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 11:17 am

If you want to know what Elvis' fur lampshade looks like, you can go to Graceland, but if you want to know what Elvis was really like, you have to read Peter Guralnick's classic two-volume biography of the King.

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This Week's Must Read
5:14 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

In The Wake Of Tragedy, The Possibility Of Understanding

Philip Seymour Hoffman
Ian Gavan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 1:12 pm

The death of the brilliant actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, killed by an apparent heroin overdose at the age of 46, is a frightening reminder of the torture that is addiction. After a bout with drugs when he was younger, Hoffman was clean for two decades. But he started taking prescription pain pills in 2012 and checked into a rehab program last year. On Sunday he was found dead in a Manhattan apartment, along with dozens of small envelopes of drugs.

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Theater
4:05 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

A Reggae Romp For The Family, With Marley's Music At Heart

Shy Jamaican boy Ziggy (Jobari Parker-Namdar) and his friend Nansi (Brittany Williams) are main characters in Three Little Birds, an off-Broadway musical driven by Bob Marley's infectious reggae songs — and created by his daughter Cedella Marley.
Michael Horan New Victory Theater

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 8:04 pm

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Movie Reviews
1:18 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Masterpieces In Peril, 'Monuments Men' Protects, But Also Panders

Critic David Edelstein says that The Monuments Men has "an all-star cast" — including Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett — but that "the stars are all low-wattage."
Claudette Barius Columbia Pictures

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 2:32 pm

George Clooney's The Monuments Men tells the largely true story of a squad of art experts who, near the end of World War II, are assigned to protect the masterworks of European society from Nazi theft and Allied bombardment. You'll notice those are two separate goals.

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The Salt
12:29 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Wine Wisdom With A Wink: A Slacker's Guide To Selecting Vino

Having trouble picking the perfect wine?
Meg Vogel/NPR

Originally published on Mon February 10, 2014 2:52 pm

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Barbershop
11:07 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Is George Zimmerman On A Road To Perdition?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer Jimi Izrael, with us from Cleveland, Arsalan Iftikhar, senior editor of The Islamic Monthly, with us from Chicago. Here in Washington D.C., contributing editor for The Root, Corey Dade. Also here in D.C., TELL ME MORE editor Ammad Omar. Take it away, Jimi.

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Faith Matters
11:07 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Love, Faith And Football In An 'Uncommon Marriage'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for Faith Matters. That's the part of the program where we talk about matters of faith and spirituality. It's just a few days after the Super Bowl and a week before Valentine's Day. So what a perfect time to talk about love, faith and football with Tony Dungy. And if you follow sports, then you know him as a retired football player and coach and the first African-American head coach to win a Super Bowl back in 2007.

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World
11:07 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Russia Hopes Sochi Ceremonies Stop 'Toilet Tweeting'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So we're staying in the world of sports because today marks the official opening of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. And because we're going to be spending so much time watching events from Sochi in the next couple of weeks, we thought it would be fun to learn more about Sochi - the region, the history and to try to learn about some of the pageantry we will be witnessing. So we have called Jennifer Eremeeva.

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Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
11:02 am
Fri February 7, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of February 6, 2014

Charlie LeDuff examines the slow decline of a once rich city in Detroit, which appears at No. 11.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
11:02 am
Fri February 7, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of February 6, 2014

At No. 13, Maeve Binchy's A Week in Winter brings together the guests at an Irish holiday resort.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
11:02 am
Fri February 7, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of February 6, 2014

In My Life in Middlemarch, Rebecca Mead delves into her favorite novel. It debuts at No. 12.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
11:02 am
Fri February 7, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of February 6, 2014

Courtesy of Random House

Debuting at No. 3, Anna Quindlen's Still Life With Bread Crumbs tells a story of unexpected love.

NPR Bestseller List
11:02 am
Fri February 7, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of February 6, 2014

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

Monkey See
10:02 am
Fri February 7, 2014

A Typewriter In The Grass And The Beat Generation On The Edge

American writer William Seward Burroughs, author of Naked Lunch.
Evening Standard Getty Images

I woke up Wednesday, drank some coffee, and learned (thank you, Frank Morris and Morning Edition) that it was the 100th anniversary of William S. Burroughs' birth. Burroughs was born in St. Louis and died in Lawrence, Kansas – improbable geographic bookends to his really out-there life.

But this post is not so much about William Burroughs as about William Burroughs' typewriter.

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Monkey See
8:54 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Watching Sports, Philip Seymour Hoffman, And Poisoned Wells

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

On this week's show, we turn to a topic near and dear to exactly half of our hearts: the wide world of sports. Glen explains how he came to feel the same way about sports that he feels about Fred Basset. Stephen envisions an actor breaking his leg and the play falling into a "clown show," and I wax rhapsodic about those great little Olympic stories about somebody's excited mom. It's the Super Bowl, the Olympics, and the nature of enthusiasm, all in one sportsy chat.

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The Two-Way
6:25 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Book News: It's The End Of The Story For Sony's E-Bookstore

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 6:32 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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