Arts

Pop Culture
11:12 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Does It 'Suck To Be A Fat Girl'?

A recent episode of FX show Louie raised some controversial questions about women, weight and body image. Did the episode miss the mark? Our panel of writers and bloggers weigh in.

Arts
11:09 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Amy LaVere at Bedrock 66 Friday Night

Amy LaVere at Donnie's Homespun Friday night. Part of the WUIS Bedrock 66 Live! series.
Credit amylavere.com

After making a name for herself in Memphis,  Texas native Amy LaVere comes to the WUIS Bedrock Stage this Friday Night.   She is appearing jointly with John Paul Keith and presenting their side project "Motel Mirrors".   From K-U-T in Austin.. David Brown talked with LaVere.

Amy LaVere along with John Paul Keith at Friday night's Bedrock show at Donnie's Homespun on Cook Street in Springfield.    The show starts at eight. Tickets available at bedrock66.com.     Tickets are $12 dollars.

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The Two-Way
6:08 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Book News: Ray Bradbury's House Is Up For Sale

The Los Angeles house where writer Ray Bradbury and his wife lived is now for sale, at nearly $1.5 million. The Fahrenheit 451 author is seen here in 2007.
Charley Gallay Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 7:22 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Remembering Two Lives: Which Are The 'Real' Children?

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 11:52 am

There's a photograph of my mother's side of the family that I often think about. In it are my mother, her five siblings, and a host of children and cousins. Nestled into the center of the photograph is my grandmother, small and frail by then, but without whom none of the rest would be there.

That sense of marvelling at what multitudes could come from one person — within sight of that person — stayed with me throughout My Real Children.

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Movie Interviews
4:18 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Filmmaker Brings Light To Roma, Holocaust Victims Lost To History

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:16 pm

The Roma people — commonly called Gypsies — have long been relegated to the margins of European society. As outsiders, they were targeted during the Holocaust, but the number of victims remains little-known. Filmmaker Aaron Yeger tells their story in the documentary A People Uncounted, and he joins the program to explain more.

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Education
4:09 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Young Poet, Big Prize: A Conversation With The Sophie Kerr Winner

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:16 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This year's Pulitzer Prize for poetry carries with it a cash prize of $10,000. The National Book Award for poetry, same amount, $10,000. That's just a little context for the whopper of a prize that Alexander Stinton just won for his poetry. Stinton is a graduating senior at Washington College on the eastern shore of Maryland and the prize that he won last week is the Sophie Kerr Prize.

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Television
12:01 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

'The Maya Rudolph Show' And What It'll Take To Bring Back Variety

The Maya Rudolph Show premiered Monday night with guest appearances from Sean Hayes, Fred Armisen and Andy Samberg.
Paul Drinkwater NBC

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 5:40 pm

On Monday night, NBC presented The Maya Rudolph Show, a one-hour prime-time variety special executive produced by Lorne Michaels and featuring many of their mutual Saturday Night Live cohorts, including Fred Armisen, Andy Samberg and Chris Parnell. It also co-starred Kristen Bell, Sean Hayes and singer Janelle Monae. The Maya Rudolph Show was an intentional effort to bring back the old-school TV variety show, but with a new-school slant that bathed most of the show in a distancing self-awareness.

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Author Interviews
12:01 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

In Life And Fiction, Edward St. Aubyn Sheds The Weight Of His Past

Edward St. Aubyn's 2006 novel Mother's Milk was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize.
Timothy Allen Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 5:39 pm

The winner of the United Kingdom's only literary prize for comic fiction was awarded Monday to Edward St. Aubyn for his new book, a satire about Britain's most prestigious literary award. The novel is called Lost for Words and it was just published in the U.S.

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Monkey See
11:02 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Be Wary And Bury The Very Scary 'I Wanna Marry Harry'

This is Matt. He looks slightly more like Prince Harry than you do.
Chris Raphael Fox

Gather round, children, and I will tell you of a dark time. A cruel time.

It was a time when reality dating shows were even worse than they are now.

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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Book News: Politician's Story Of Growing Up Poor Wins Ondaatje Prize

Alan Johnson's This Boy: A Memoir of a Childhood describes life with his mother and sister in public housing in London's North Kensington neighborhood.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue May 20, 2014

A 'Great Day At Sea' For A Brit Aboard An American Carrier

AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 1:34 pm

One of the most enviable aspects of Geoff Dyer's intellect is how nomadic it is. With dazzling authority and acuity, he has roamed over subjects as varied and dense as jazz (But Beautiful), photography (The Ongoing Moment), D.H. Lawrence (Out of Sheer Rage), and the perfect doughnut (the title essay of Otherwise Known as the Human Condition). Dyer himself is just as peripatetic, and his appetite for new experiences is the perfect reason to procrastinate on writing about them.

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The Salt
5:59 am
Tue May 20, 2014

'Third Plate' Reimagines Farm-To-Table Eating To Nourish The Land

A view of Dan Barber's Stone Barns Center field and barns in Pocantico Hills, N.Y.
Nicole Franzen Courtesy of Blue Hill Farm

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 4:56 pm

Perched on a farm along the Hudson River is Dan Barber's award-winning restaurant, Blue Hill at Stone Barns. The food that's harvested on the farm year-round is what is served to diners daily.

But this champion of the farm-to-table movement noticed that farming and consuming foods locally still wasn't all that sustainable.

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The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Selfie, Unfriend, Hashtag: From Your Teen's Phone To The Dictionary

Selfie is one of the 150-plus new words added to Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 5:38 pm

In school, many of us were sent to dictionaries to look up words we didn't know.

Now, dictionaries are coming to us, filling themselves up with terms that may already feel overly familiar.

More than 150 new words and definitions have been added to the Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, the publisher announced Monday. The list includes selfie, hashtag, big data and unfriend.

"So many of these new words show the impact of online connectivity to our lives and livelihood," Peter Sokolowski, a Merriam-Webster editor, said in a statement.

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History
3:16 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

The Winding Stories Of A Quintessential American Spy

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 7:54 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. On April 18th, 1983, President Ronald Reagan addressed the nation about news that had broken earlier that morning in Lebanon.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED SPEECH)

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Book Reviews
3:16 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Book Review: 'Abide'

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 7:54 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Two days before his death in 2012, poet Jake Adam York handed in the manuscript for his last book. He was 40 and had already published three collections. Now, his fourth one is out posthumously. It's called "Abide." Poet Tess Taylor has our review.

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Television
1:59 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Louis C.K. On His 'Louie' Hiatus: 'I Wanted The Show To Feel New Again'

In Louie, Louis C.K. plays a comic who finds comedy in uncomfortable, touchy topics.
K.C. Bailey FX

Louis C.K. is now commonly acknowledged as one of the greatest comics of his generation. His celebrated FX series, Louie, started its fourth season a couple weeks ago, after a 19-month hiatus.

Louis C.K. created, writes, directs and stars in the series as a standup comic named Louie, who, like Louis C.K., is the divorced father of two young girls and shares custody with their mother. Last year, Louis C.K. also had prominent roles in two films: Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine and David O. Russell's American Hustle.

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The Salt
1:52 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The White Castle Waffle Breakfast Sandwich

The White Castle Waffle Sandwich pales in comparison with the Carl Kasell Waffle Sandwich.
NPR

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 2:37 pm

Like bacon or cupcakes before it, the waffle is enjoying a surge in popularity, showing up everywhere from the Taco Bell Waffle Taco to Chicken and Waffles potato chips.

But fame has its price, and before the waffle hits rock bottom and checks itself into rehab for exhaustion, let's try the White Castle Waffle Breakfast Sandwich.

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The Salt
11:09 am
Mon May 19, 2014

'Fed Up' Portrays Obese Kids As Victims In A Sugar-Coated World

The true stars of the documentary film Fed Up are several children — including Maggie Valentine, 12 — who are trying to lose weight.
YouTube

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 3:50 pm

Just who's to blame for the childhood obesity epidemic? Over the years, the finger has been pointed at parents, video games, Happy Meals and the hamburgers in the school cafeteria.

A new documentary, Fed Up, alleges it all boils down to a simple substance most of us consume every day: sugar. The pushers of "the new tobacco," according to the film, are the food industry and our own government.

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Television
11:08 am
Mon May 19, 2014

New Sitcom 'Unapologetically Embraces' Asian-American Family Life

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, I want to talk more about one of the shows that Eric just mentioned earlier a few minutes ago. It's a sitcom recently announced by ABC. It will be the first network family sitcom in two decades to feature an Asian-American cast. It's called "Fresh Off The Boat."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "FRESH OFF THE BOAT")

HUDSON YANG: (As Eddie) Me - my American dream is to fit in.

CONSTANCE WU: (As Jessica) Why do all your shirts have black men on them?

H. YANG: (As Eddie) It's Notorious B.I.G.

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Television
11:08 am
Mon May 19, 2014

TV Networks Double Down On Diversity This Fall

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. You may have to rethink your TV-watching schedule now that most of the major networks have unveiled their new fall offerings, as well as which shows made the cut and which ones will fade to black.

Later, we will hear from writer Jeff Yang. You've heard him here, on both our Parenting and Barbershop roundtables. He's going to tell us about ABC's new show "Fresh Off The Boat" because his son is the star of the new sitcom.

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Media
11:08 am
Mon May 19, 2014

'New York Times' Upheaval: Is This A Barack Vs. Hillary Moment?

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend a good chunk of the rest of the day's program talking about issues in the media that all happen to bubble up at the same time. Later, we'll talk about why the new fall season just got more colorful. We'll hear about one show that puts an Asian-American family front and center in a network sitcom for the first time in 20 years.

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NPR Bestseller List
10:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of May 15, 2014

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
10:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of May 15, 2014

At No. 8, Dan Jones' The Plantagenets explores the royal dynasty that preceded the Tudors.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
10:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of May 15, 2014

In The Longest Ride, Nicholas Sparks tells the story of a widower who befriends a young college student and her cowboy boyfriend. It appears at No. 9.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
10:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of May 15, 2014

One of notorious Cleveland kidnapper Ariel Castro's three victims shares the details of her abduction in Finding Me. It debuts at No. 10.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
10:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of May 15, 2014

Anthony Doerr's All The Light We Cannot See follows a blind French girl and a young German private during World War II. It debuts at No. 2.

The Two-Way
9:00 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Gordon Willis, Cinematographer Who Gave Woody Allen Films Their Look, Dies

Cinematographer Gordon Willis poses with his honorary Oscar following a 2009 ceremony in Los Angeles.
Chris Pizzello AP

Gordon Willis, the cinematographer behind such classic 1970s films as Annie Hall, Klute, All the President's Men and the Godfather series, died on Sunday. He was 82.

"One cinematographer had established a kind of noir color look, rich in brown, amber and shadow, that was a vital force in the noir movies made in Hollywood in the 1970s," film historian David Thomson wrote of Willis in his New Biographical Dictionary of Film.

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The Two-Way
6:35 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Book News: Novel Mocking Literary Prizes Wins Literary Prize

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

What We Learned From The Best Commencement Speeches Ever

Conan O'Brien's 2011 commencement address at Dartmouth College was one of those speeches that was so good it drew news coverage.
Jason R. Henske AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 7:32 am

Something funny has happened to the familiar commencement address in the past 10 years. That something is YouTube. Steve Jobs' 2005 address at Stanford, to take just one example, has been viewed upwards of 20 million times.

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Business
4:11 am
Mon May 19, 2014

AT&T To Buy DirecTV In Nearly $50 Billion Deal

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good Morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

If you've streamed a movie or a TV show recently, you are part of the problem facing cable and satellite providers. These companies are facing more and more competition from Internet streaming, and to survive, some are consolidating.

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