Arts

Media
2:46 am
Fri February 14, 2014

'Harried Mom' Becomes Dynamic Woman In These Stock Images

Getty's new collection of stock images of women and families veers away from the "overworked mom" stereotype.
Cavan Images Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 9:46 am

This week Getty Images teamed up with LeanIn.org, the nonprofit foundation of Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg, to release a new collection of stock photos. There are about 2,500 new images of modern women and families.

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The Two-Way
1:08 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Actor Ralph Waite, Father On 'Waltons,' Dies At 85

Ralph Waite more recently had a recurring role on the CBS drama NCIS as Jackson Gibbs.
Cliff Lipson CBS /Landov

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 10:16 am

Ralph Waite, the actor best known as the father on the hit television show The Waltons, died Thursday. He was 85. His manager, Alan Mills, confirmed the news.

The Waltons aired on CBS from 1972 until 1981.

It was about a family in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains in the Depression-era 1930s.

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Movie Reviews
4:33 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Into An 'Adult World,' With A Quirky Coterie To Assist

Emma Roberts is an aspiring poet, and John Cusack a played-out one, in the quirky comedy Adult World.
IFC Films

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

A Zombie Plague, But It's Covered By Your Health Plan

Kate (Emily Hampshire) treats the victims of zombie attacks — among them her husband, Alex (Kris Holden-Reid), in a world where medication can keep the zombie-bitten human, but supplies may be running low.
levelFILM

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 9:19 am

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Two Exiles, Digging Through The Past For Clues To Their Present

Georges Devereux (Mathieu Amalric) and James Picard (Benicio Del Toro) develop a bond as doctor and patient in an intriguing film from French director Arnaud Desplechin.
Nicole Rivelli IFC Films

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

'RoboCop' Remake, As Mechanical As Its Cyborg Hero

Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman) is a Detroit cop brought back from the brink of death — as a cyborg supercop built for reducing crime and increasing profit.
Kerry Hayes Sony Pictures

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Book Reviews
2:09 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Robert Frost's Letters Reveal: He Really Cared What Readers Thought

Courtesy of Belknap Press

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 7:32 am

On July 4, 1913, Robert Frost wrote to his good friend John Bartlett, describing his strengths as a poet: "To be perfectly frank with you I am one of the most notable craftsmen of my time. ... I alone of English writers have consciously set myself to make music out of what I may call the sound of sense."

Frost was 39 years old when he wrote those words. Despite the hubristic and self-assured tone, he had published one book of poetry, A Boy's Will, and was relatively unknown in literary circles.

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Television
12:51 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

In 'Whole Gritty City,' Marching Bands Vie For Coveted Mardi Gras Spots

The Whole Gritty City follows young student marching bands as they prepare for coveted spots in the New Orleans parade." href="/post/whole-gritty-city-marching-bands-vie-coveted-mardi-gras-spots" class="noexit lightbox">
Eleven-year-old Jaron "Bear" Williams practices trumpet before marching in his first Mardi Gras season. The Whole Gritty City follows young student marching bands as they prepare for coveted spots in the New Orleans parade.
Courtesy of CBS

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 3:51 pm

There are times when television really does try to put its best foot forward — promoting a new fall season, for example. But it's an almost twisted rule of TV that sometimes, the better a television offering is, the more likely it is to be shown when even the network presenting it doesn't think many people will be watching.

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Arts & Life
10:50 am
Thu February 13, 2014

From Top Model To Black Panther, Actress Yaya Alafia Is 'Truly African-American'

In 2013, Yaya Alafia played Black Panther Carol Hammie in The Butler.
Beth Rosner Management

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 1:22 pm

Yaya Alafia arrived on TV screens more than a decade ago as Yaya DaCosta, the young model proud of her African and Latina roots in Season 3 of America's Next Top Model. But, as she tells NPR's Michel Martin, she has come a long way since competing on the series. "I have practiced such deliberate amnesia when it came to that show," she admits. "Just hearing my voice at such a young, vulnerable age, forced into this other world that I wasn't prepared for."

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Ask Me Another
10:42 am
Thu February 13, 2014

That's A-L-L, Folks

To wrap up the show, puzzle guru Greg Pliska asks our finalists to give it their "a-l-l," and think up answers that contain those letters in consecutive order. Unlike Porky Pig, however, contestants have to reach deep into their trivia brains to make sure they don't come up with any fa-l-lacies!

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Ask Me Another
10:40 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Presidential Monster Hunter

Did you see Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter? Well, Honest Abe wasn't the only Commander-in-Chief to fight the supernatural. In this game, we ask you to imagine other films that might depict presidents and the mythological creatures they fought, like George Washington: Dinosaur Hunter. Who knew that the father of our country was fighting T. Rex as well as Rex Anglie (The King of England)?

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Ask Me Another
10:29 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Random Questions With: Delia Ephron

Very Important Puzzler Delia Ephron talks with Ask Me Another host Ophira Eisenberg about growing up in a family full of writers.
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 1:26 pm

Is your foodie sister-in-law insisting that everyone "elevate" the next family potluck by bringing fancier dishes? Never fear. We asked V.I.P. Delia Ephron for advice on how to handle this and other tricky family situations. Luckily, the author of Sister Mother Husband Dog comes from a large family of writers (she and her sister, Nora Ephron, co-wrote and produced You've Got Mail and Sleepless In Seattle) and knows which situations require diplomacy, and which call for more "creative" solutions.

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Ask Me Another
10:22 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Mime Time

Brother, can you spare a mime? No, it's not pledge drive season yet. In this game, house musician Jonathan Coulton asks our contestants to put on their pun hats (berets, naturally) and answer clues with clever puns that include the word "mime". Cue the groans!

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

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Ask Me Another
10:20 am
Thu February 13, 2014

The Answer Lies Within

It's any quiz show contestant's dream come true. In this game, we're going to give you all the answers. Yes, we're serious. Listen as host Ophira Eisenberg gives our contestants clues to answers that are contained within the questions themselves. But be careful: it's not as easy as it sounds!

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Monkey See
8:55 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Bob And Linda Read Internet Movie Reviews, Part 4: 'Gravity'

NPR

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 12:26 pm

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The Two-Way
6:43 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Book News: Slam Poet Maggie Estep Dies

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:45 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Will Comcast Get Federal OK To Buy Time Warner?

Gene J. Puskar AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 9:44 am

(We put a new top on this story at 9:25 a.m. ET and added an update at 10:15 a.m. ET.)

As NPR's David Folkenflik pointed out earlier today, Comcast's proposed $45 billion purchase of fellow cable company Time Warner will receive some scrutiny from federal officials. Here's some more about that part of the story:

Politico writes that:

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Book Reviews
6:03 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Harrowing Memories, Intersecting Lives In 'Thirty Girls'

Susan Minot's previous books include Rapture and Folly.
Knopf/Random House

The central drama in Susan Minot's fourth novel comes from a real-life episode in October 1996, when 139 girls at St. Mary's College in Aboke, Uganda, were abducted by guerillas from the militant Lord's Resistance Army. The school's Italian headmistress followed the rebels into the bush and retrieved all but 30 of the girls — hence the title.

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Code Switch
6:00 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Redefining Hollywood: 'Diversity Makes More Money'

NBCUniversal's The Voice judges Adam Levine (from left), Christina Aguilera, CeeLo Green and Blake Shelton at the Season 3 Red Carpet Event at The House of Blues Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, Calif., in 2012.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

If you spend much time talking about diversity in Hollywood, it's an argument you'll hear often: that ethnic and gender diversity is nice, but it doesn't make a movie profitable or bring ratings to a TV show.

But researchers at the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA have produced a study that just might stick a pin in that defense, sorting through over 1,200 films and TV shows to reach a provocative conclusion:

Diversity makes more money and brings bigger audiences.

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Remembrances
5:05 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Sid Caesar, Who Got Laughs Without Politics Or Putdowns, Dies At 91

Actor/comedian Sid Caesar
NBC NBC via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 7:00 pm

Comedian Sid Caesar, one of early network TV's biggest stars, died Wednesday morning at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 91.

Caesar didn't do smut, putdowns or smarmy remarks. Instead, he did skits: grown-up, gentle comedy for the whole family.

In one skit, Caesar was the smarter-than-anyone German "professor." Carl Reiner played a movie executive with money problems. The professor's solution? Make a musical — and get the greatest composer in the world. He is shocked to discover that his top choice won't be available.

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All Tech Considered
5:05 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Dating Sites Offer Chance At Love — And A Lesson In Economics

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 7:58 pm

Paul Oyer, a professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, has been teaching economics for almost two decades. His experience with online dating started much more recently. But when he started looking for love online, Oyer discovered that the principles he teaches in the classroom were surprisingly applicable to this new marketplace.

In a new book, Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned From Online Dating, Oyer explains economic concepts in terms of online profiles and dating decisions.

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Books
5:05 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Like Individual Novels, These Stories Appeal, Satisfy And Delight

promo
iStickphoto

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 7:00 pm

The title of Molly Antopol's deft collection is a kind of pun. While the House Un-American Activities Committee makes a direct appearance in "The Unknown Soldier," a story about a movie actor who's been released from prison after serving time during the Communist witch hunt, to be "un-American" in this book often means just not being American. Antopol's characters are sometimes Israeli or Russian, and her stories are set in Tel Aviv, Prague, the Ukraine.

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The Two-Way
3:23 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Comedian And Actor Sid Caesar Has Died At 91

Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca in a scene from Your Show of Shows. Caesar, whose sketches lit up 1950s television, died Wednesday at 91.
AP

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 3:59 pm

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Animals
12:50 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

In The World's 'Sixth Extinction,' Are Humans The Asteroid?

Elizabeth Kolbert says the "taxicab yellow" Panamanian golden frog was nearly wiped out by a fungal disease. It's just one of the species affected by what scientists call the Sixth Extinction.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 9:25 am

The dinosaurs were killed during the Fifth Extinction — which scientists suspect was caused by an asteroid. Now, we are living through an epoch that many scientists describe as the Sixth Extinction, and this time, human activity is the culprit. As one scientist put it: We're the asteroid.

Elizabeth Kolbert is the author of the new book The Sixth Extinction. It begins with a history of the "big five" extinctions of the past, and goes on to explain how human behavior is creating a sixth one — including our use of fossil fuels and the effects of climate change.

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All Tech Considered
10:19 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Weekly Un-Innovation: There's Nothing To See Here

You saw Nothing.
Milan Vermeulen Courtesy of Nothing

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 1:10 pm

In our Weekly Innovation series, we pick an interesting idea, design or product that you may not know about yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Use our form.

Normally we cover high-tech innovations in the form of gadgets that are supposed to make your life easier. But today, we're writing about ... Nothing.

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Monkey See
8:34 am
Wed February 12, 2014

How Indie Star Greta Gerwig Met Her New CBS Sitcom

Greta Gerwig, seen here at the Berlinale International Film Festival last week, is coming to a CBS pilot.
Ian Gavan Getty Images

News broke last night that Greta Gerwig, most recently admired for Frances Ha, which she starred in and co-wrote with director Noah Baumbach, will star in (and co-produce) a comedy pilot for CBS.

Not just any comedy pilot, though: Gerwig is working on How I Met Your Dad, a parallel to the concluding How I Met Your Mother from the same producers, Carter Bays and Craig Thomas.

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The Two-Way
6:50 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Book News: Gabrielle Giffords Writing Book About Gun Control

Former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, accompanied by her husband, retired astronaut Mark Kelly, speaks during a July 2013 news conference in Manchester, N.H.
Mary Schwalm AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Author Interviews
6:01 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Adventures Ripped From The Headlines: Questions For Alex Berenson

This week sees the publication of The Counterfeit Agent, the 8th book in author Alex Berenson's thriller series featuring former military man and CIA recruit John Wells. Wells can kill with his bare hands, he likes to exorcise his demons in the dead of night, at breakneck speed on the back of a motorcycle — and by the way, he's converted to Islam (a plot point TV viewers are seeing on Homeland years after Berenson featured it). Even after leaving the CIA, Wells never really leaves his job.

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Art & Design
2:39 am
Wed February 12, 2014

At Last, New York Fashion Week Brings 'Good News For Real People'

Needleman says The Row has created an oversized sweater and sweater-skirt "that looks like if you were to lay down, you could just wrap it over yourself like a blanket and go to sleep."
Arno Frugier The Row Fall 2014 Collection

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 8:27 am

This year, the models on the runway at New York Fashion Week look downright comfortable — and Deborah Needleman, editor in chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine, says that's "good news for real people."

In the semi-annual event, fashion editors and store buyers attend elaborate runway shows staged in tents at Lincoln Center and other locations around New York City. Designers present clothes to them that consumers may see in stores in the fall.

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The Picture Show
2:36 am
Wed February 12, 2014

In Photos: Moroccan Motorcycle Mashup

"Kesh Angels"
Hassan Hajjaj Courtesy of Taymour Grahne Gallery, New York

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 9:00 am

In the 1990s, Hassan Hajjaj assisted on a magazine photo shoot in Marrakesh when he had a realization: All the models, the photographer and even the clothes were from another country. Morocco, the country he grew up in, was simply the backdrop.

"From then I said it'd be great to present my people in their environment in their kind of way of dressing," he says in an interview on NPR's Morning Edition, "and play with it in that fashion way."

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