Arts

Book Reviews
3:16 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Book Review: 'I Am The Beggar Of The World'

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

After reading, watching and listening to news out of Afghanistan for the past 12 years, poet Tess Taylor says she's finally found a book that offers a rare, deep glimpse into Afghan lives. It's a collection of poems - a form called landays - translated by Eliza Griswold, with photographs by Seamus Murphy. The book is called "I Am The Beggar Of The World." Here's Tess Taylor.

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Movies
3:16 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

With Possible Theme Park, 'Hunger Games' May Live Beyond Final Film

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

The movie studio Lionsgate is exploring the possibility of a theme park based on The Hunger Games films and books. To test the idea's viability, the company announced that it will launch a Hunger Games exhibition at museums around the country next summer.

Books
3:15 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

A Satire Of Literary Prizes Reveals A World Of Insanity

trophy
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

The Man Booker Prize is given in England each year to "the best novel in the opinion of the judges." And if you're the gambling type, you can place bets on who you think will win. At one point in 2013, the U.K. gambling service Ladbroke's set betting odds on Harvest by Jim Crace at 6/4; The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton at 11/4, and A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki at 8/1.

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The Salt
1:42 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

How A Food Stylist Made Squirrel And Earthworm Look Appetizing

Left, gray squirrel. Right, crostini with squirrel meat, white mulberry, goat cheese, hazelnut and purslane.
Christopher Testani

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 6:44 am

Communities around the world are increasingly overrun by invasive critters. Gray squirrels, which are native to North America, are an ecological nuisance in England. And nutria — or swamp rats, colloquially — from South America are destroying wetlands in the Gulf Coast states.

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The Two-Way
12:08 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Richard III: Not The Hunchback We Thought He Was?

King Richard III, seen here portrayed by actor Paul Daneman in 1962, has often been described as a hunchback. A new study of his skeleton seeks to set the record straight about the monarch's condition.
John Franks Getty Images

The physical condition of England's King Richard III has been a subject of debate for centuries. Now scientists say 3-D skeletal modeling shows the monarch who lived 500 years ago had a common form of scoliosis and that he's been a victim of spin on a historic scale.

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NPR Bestseller List
11:03 am
Fri May 30, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of May 29, 2014

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri May 30, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of May 29, 2014

No Easy Day, at No. 10, provides a firsthand account of the Navy SEAL mission that killed Osama bin Laden.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri May 30, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of May 29, 2014

At No. 10, Dan Brown's Inferno features Robert Langdon grappling with a riddle tied to Dante's masterpiece.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri May 30, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of May 29, 2014

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 9:10 am

While economists debate the accuracy of the book's data, Thomas Piketty's Capital In The Twenty-First Century holds on to its No. 1 spot.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri May 30, 2014

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of May 29, 2014

Emily Giffin's The One & Only, a Texas-set novel of love, loss and football, debuts at No. 3.

Monkey See
10:03 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Recycling Franchises And Judging Books By Their Covers

NPR

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 10:08 am

  • Listen To Pop Culture Happy Hour

With Glen Weldon tweeting from the various paradises of Barcelona, this week's Pop Culture Happy Hour calls on the services of two familiar Code Switch pals — Kat Chow and Gene Demby — to discuss the eternal recycling of unlikely pop-culture franchises. We use the July return of Sailor Moon as an excuse to talk about everything from Girl Meets World to Hocus Pocus, George of the Jungle, Newsies, Transformers and more.

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Movie Reviews
8:52 am
Fri May 30, 2014

'Maleficent' Tells The Fairy Tale From The Wicked One's Perspective

Maleficent rehabilitates the most maligned figure in the fairy tale canon.
Frank Connor Disney

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 1:00 pm

Of all Disney heroines, Aurora, aka Sleeping Beauty, was the least inspiring. Not her fault: How much spark can you wring from a Forever Nap, especially one that's cut off by a kiss from a prince named after the Duke of Edinburgh?

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Arts
8:00 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Theatre In The Park New Season Begins

Theatre In The Park
Credit Springfield Convention and Visitors Bureau

If taking in the arts in the great outdoors interests you, check out Theatre in the Park at Lincoln's  New Salem State Historic Site in Petersburg. The Diary of Anne Frank kicks off the new season Friday night, the first of 6 performances.

Kari Catton is Executive Director of Theatre In The Park.  "It's a piece of history that I believe everybody should know about.  And when we choose our plays out there, we do think about 'Would Abraham Lincoln like to have seen this play?"

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Shots - Health News
6:20 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

No Hunch Here: Richard III Suffered From Scoliosis Instead

Portrait of King Richard III.
Getty Images/The Bridgeman Art Library

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 7:03 pm

Shakespeare calls Richard III "rudely stamp'd," with the king's "hunchbacked" form revealing the twisted soul within. Actors have reveled in playing the monarch as a limping, deformed creature with a withered arm.

But when the bones of the 15th century king were unearthed from beneath a British parking lot in 2012, the skeleton showed no evidence of a hunch. Instead, the vertebrae lay in a curve suggesting that Richard might have had scoliosis.

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The Salt
4:21 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Hot Sauce Art: LA Museum Honors Sriracha and Tapatio

Audrey Chan's Proposal for a Mural Dedicated to David Tran.
Courtesy of the Chinese American Museum

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:46 pm

You can find bottles of Sriracha and Tapatio, two of America's most popular hot sauces, sharing space with the ketchup and mayo in millions of American refrigerators, on the shelves of supermarkets and adorning the tables of restaurants across the country.

And until July 12, the fiery condiments are conquering yet another space: the walls of a museum.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

'Night Moves' Leaves Too Much In The Dark

In Night Moves, Josh (Jesse Eisenberg) and two other partners in crime (played by Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard) plot to load a boat with explosives and blow up a dam in an act of consciousness-raising eco-terrorism.
Cinedigm

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:09 pm

The natural world has never been the most hospitable place for Kelly Reichardt's characters. In Meek's Cutoff, a group of 19th century settlers nearly lose their lives while traveling west across the scorching Oregon desert. In Wendy and Lucy, when Wendy is forced to sleep in the woods after her car breaks down on the way to Alaska, she wakes up in the middle of the night to a deranged man talking to himself right by her side.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

MacFarlane's 'Million Ways To Die In The West' Is An Assault Of Its Own

Seth MacFarlane, who wrote and directed A Million Ways to Die in the West, stars as Albert, a cowardly sheep farmer who inadvertently falls in love with the wife (Charlize Theron) of a dangerous outlaw (Liam Neeson).
Universal Pictures

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:54 pm

There's a scene in Seth MacFarlane's animated sitcom Family Guy in which the precocious baby Stewie attempts to get his mom's attention through a solid 30 seconds of just repeating her name or variations on the word "mom." That's the whole joke: A kid just keeps repeating essentially the same word for 30 seconds until he wears her down, and then he doesn't have anything more to say than "hi" once he finally gets her attention.

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Media
3:27 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

For TV Advertisers, A Hunt For Live Audiences

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:11 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, BYLINE: Now, if you're a company wanting to buy advertising on television, nowadays you'll find some heavily watched programming more attractive than some other heavily watched programming, for example the old reliable.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIEGEL: A big, live sports event, or a more novel idea, the familiar musical, performed live.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSICAL)

CHORUS: Doe, a deer, a female deer. Ray, a drop of golden sun.

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Performing Arts
3:27 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Veterans' 'Philoctetes' Puts Modern Spin On Ancient Greek Play

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:11 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Television
3:27 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

TV Offerings Are Hotter Than Usual This Summer

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:11 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, BYLINE: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, BYLINE: And I'm Melissa Block. Instead of taking their usual summer vacation, the TV networks are working to get your attention this summer. They're hoping to lure your eyes away from cable channels and online shows. To talk about some of the hot summer programming that will be on the schedule, I'm joined now by NPR TV critic Eric Deggans. And Eric, summer is usually when the networks slow down, but not this year. What's going on?

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Fine Art
1:18 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

'Degenerate' Exhibit Recalls Nazi War On Modern Art

The Neue Galerie exhibit's empty frames represent paintings that were lost or destroyed by the Nazis. They appear beside works that survived Nazi rule, like George Grosz's Portrait of the Writer Max Hermann-Neisse (lower right).
Courtesy of Hulya Kolabas for Neue Galerie New York

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 1:28 pm

One of the most unsettling rooms in an important art exhibit at New York's Neue Galerie is a room in which numerous empty frames are hanging, with guesses about which paintings might have been in them. The paintings themselves were all lost or destroyed by the Nazis. Encouraged by Hitler, most Nazis (Joseph Goebbels was the rare exception) considered everything but the most hidebound, traditionally realistic paintings and sculptures to be "degenerate," a threat to the Aryan ideals of German culture.

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Movies
11:21 am
Thu May 29, 2014

'Belle': Romance, Race And Slavery With Jane Austen Style

Gugu Mbatha-Raw as Dido Elizabeth Belle in Belle.
David Appleby Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:12 pm

British actress Gugu Mbatha-Raw was brought up on Jane Austen adaptations. "You know, the Pride and Prejudice with Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle was something I watched on a weekly basis with my mum at home in Oxfordshire," she tells NPR's Michel Martin.

But as the biracial actress completed her training at Britain's Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts, she watched her peers win roles in "the Downton Abbeys of this world" and realized those period dramas weren't calling her. It made Mbatha-Raw ask: "Why can't I be in something like this?"

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Ask Me Another
10:20 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Master Class With John Turturro

John Turturro and Spike Lee's long-standing collaboration spans several films, including Do the Right Thing, Mo' Better Blues and He Got Game.
Bruce Bennett Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 4:00 pm

  • On directing Woody Allen, messing with Michael Bay

Jesus in the Coen brothers' The Big Lebowski, Pino in Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing, Herb Stempel in Robert Redford's Quiz Show -- actor John Turturro has performed countless memorable movie roles. Moving behind the camera, Turturro wrote, directed and starred in the new movie Fading Gigolo, which found him working alongside one of his influences, Woody Allen. It all started because the two men share the same barber.

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Ask Me Another
10:20 am
Thu May 29, 2014

John Turturro: Walken On Sunshine

John Turturro turns to his wife, actress Katherine Borowitz, for help during a quiz about the legendary Christopher Walken, on stage at The Bell House in Brooklyn, NY.
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 10:33 am

Turturro is a star in his own right, but he and his wife, actress Katherine Borowitz play a game about fellow thespian Christopher Walken. We've got a fever, and the only prescription is more trivia!

Plus, hear house musician Jonathan Coulton playfully cover Marc Cohn's "Walking in Memphis."

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Ask Me Another
10:05 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Stick To Your Day Job

Sometimes a career switch is all you need, but some celebs might have been better off not branching out. Whose acting makes him "Master and Commander," but his singing is "Les Miserables"?

Heard in Episode 318: O'Brother, Where Art Thou Quiz Show?

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Ask Me Another
10:05 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Aww-Inspiring

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 3:00 pm

The internet is good for many things, but especially pictures of dogs in tiny hats. All answers in this game contain the sound "aw." Say them like you're looking at an adorable corgi puppy.

Heard in Episode 318: O'Brother, Where Art Thou Quiz Show?

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Ask Me Another
10:05 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Fuhgeddaboutdit!

The Spice Girls are comprised of Sporty, Posh, Scary, Ginger and...? We'll tell you all the members of a certain category, except one. Give us your Brooklyn accent and call us out on the one we forgot.

Heard in Episode 318: O'Brother, Where Art Thou Quiz Show?

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Ask Me Another
10:05 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Popping The Question

Music sometimes asks big questions, like "Why Do Fools Fall In Love?" In this game, rewritten lyrics to inquisitively-titled songs make them decidedly weirder. Tell me why: why do hands fit in gloves?

Heard in Episode 318: O'Brother, Where Art Thou Quiz Show?

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Ask Me Another
10:05 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Taking A Vowel Of Poverty

In this final round, all answers are words that contain three or more of a single vowel—and only that vowel. Strap on your bikinis and muumuus, and crank up the Bananarama!

Heard in Episode 318: O'Brother, Where Art Thou Quiz Show?

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Book Reviews
6:16 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Magic From The Margins In Long-Awaited 'Long Hidden'

Originally published on

As I was growing up, the fantasy worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis provided a way to escape a childhood I wasn't quite sure I would survive. Myth is powerful stuff; it opened doorways to alternate realities that helped me see more clearly the twisted power lines that dictated my upbringing. But that was my childhood: the childhood of a white, middle class girl who could relate to middle class white hobbits and the Pevensie children and the icky evil they encountered (which, trust me, was very icky).

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