Arts

Author Interviews
2:30 am
Thu June 5, 2014

John Green's 'Stars' Shines Bright On The Silver Screen

Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort play the cancer-stricken lovers in The Fault in Our Stars.
Temple Hill Entertainment

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 11:40 am

It's a writer's fantasy. You author a book. It hits the young adult jackpot. It sells 10 million copies. Hollywood actors fight for parts in the movie.

Welcome to John Green's reality. Not too long ago, in New York City, he introduced a screening of the film based on his novel, The Fault in Our Stars, to an audience of hundreds of teenagers ecstatically screaming his name. They cried copiously throughout the film, which follows a romance between two teenagers with cancer.

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Movies
3:08 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

'Nerdfighters' Mobilize For Film Premiere, Armed With Favorite Lines

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 6:18 pm

John Green's love story, The Fault in Our Stars, is a cult classic for young readers. The film adaptation comes out Friday, and excitement has reached a fever pitch among middle-schoolers obsessed with the book.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Law
2:20 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

'Burning Down The House' Makes The Case Against Juvenile Incarceration

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 3:57 pm

The American rate of juvenile incarceration is seven times that of Great Britain, and 18 times that of France. It costs, on average, $88,000 a year to keep a youth locked up — far more than the U.S. spends on a child's education.

But the biggest problem with juvenile incarceration, author Nell Bernstein tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies, is that instead of helping troubled kids get their lives back on track, detention usually makes their problems worse, and sets them in the direction of more crime and self-destructive behavior.

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Theater
10:59 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Anika Noni Rose Breathes New Life Into Classic 'Raisin In The Sun'

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 12:44 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now you may think you know the play "A Raisin In The Sun" from its many stage and screen performances, but the latest revival starring Denzel Washington, Sophie Okonedo and Anika Noni Rose is bringing new life into the American classic. The production has already received five Tony Award nominations, including one for Anika Noni Rose's performance as the spirited, aspiring doctor, Beneatha Younger.

(SOUNDBITE OF PLAY, "A RAISIN IN THE SUN")

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Author Interviews
10:59 am
Wed June 4, 2014

After Tiananmen Square, New Lives On A New Continent

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 12:44 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Book Reviews
6:21 am
Wed June 4, 2014

'Night Heron' And 'The Director' Provide A Double Shot Of Intrigue

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 9:39 am

I suppose it's preaching to the converted to announce that David Ignatius has done it again. But here he is, having written yet another deeply engaging spy thriller, rooted at that point where the intricacies of the intelligence community and the everyday world of civilians converge. However, it's a reviewer's duty to point out some fascinating new turns in the man's work — in particular, the highlighting of Internet communications as a source of secret information over the conventional collection of data in the field, and the actual manipulation of events by means of writing code.

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Parallels
2:26 am
Wed June 4, 2014

As Myanmar Modernizes, Architectural Gems Are Endangered

At the center of Yangon, the city's colonial heritage, Buddhist faith and emerging modern face are visible in a single block.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 10:08 am

Decades of socialism and military rule kept Myanmar — or Burma, as it was known — poor and isolated.

There was one upside, though. The economy was so lousy, there was no drive to demolish the big British colonial buildings in Yangon, Myanmar's largest city, and replace them with the glass and steel towers that now define much of the skylines in East Asia.

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Author Interviews
4:54 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

From Lunch (n.) To Balding (adj.), Some Words Are Just 'Bad English'

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 10:02 pm

Ammon Shea, author of Reading the OED, has just come out with a new book about words — words like "dilapidated," "balding" and "lunch." Shea says those words were once frowned upon, as were more than 200 other words he has compiled.

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Movie Interviews
3:08 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

In 'Night Moves,' Filmmaker Dredges The Tension That Lives In Quiet

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Director Kelly Reichardt's films live between the spaces of words unsaid. Her body of work includes "Wendy And Lucy," "Meek's Cutoff" and "Old Joy." All of her films are marked with deliberate pacing and sparse dialogue, with the Pacific Northwest as their backdrop.

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Book Reviews
3:08 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Book Review: 'The Director' and 'Night Heron'

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Now, two new spy novels, both written by journalists - one by an old hand of the genre, Washington Post columnist David Ignatius - the other by a first-time novelist, Adam Brookes at the BBC. Alan Cheuse has our reviews.

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Monkey See
12:22 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Do Female-Named Hurricanes Need To Lean In?

When it rains, it pours: Here's some advice for lady hurricanes on how to climb the corporate ladder.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 4:37 pm

We were alarmed to learn yesterday that hurricanes with female names are not being taken as seriously as their male counterparts. It seems people in the path of a hurricane are more likely to heed warnings to take shelter or evacuate if the storm is named Charley than if the storm is named Eloise. Which can be a deadly decision. [Because, seriously: Hurricanes are dangerous — even if they have "lady" names.

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Parenting
12:09 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Diverse Summer Reading Picks For Kids

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN: I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice. And today we want to get their advice about summer reading. If you have small people or teenagers in your house, then you are probably already in the throes of summeritis. And yes, I think I just made that word up. It means that the kids are ready for the reading, writing and arithmetic to end.

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Health
12:09 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

'Wait To Worry' About Challenges

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN: As we've just heard, being fired or losing your job is something that a lot of people have had to worry about in recent years. But our next guest has some advice for those of us who tend to worry a lot about life's what-ifs. That advice is to wait. Columnist Steven Petrow recently wrote about his epiphany and learning how to wait to worry for The Washington Post. In the piece, he talked about how he decided to stop worrying about stuff that hadn't even happened yet. Steven Petrow is with us now. Welcome back. Thanks so much for joining us once again.

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All Tech Considered
10:57 am
Tue June 3, 2014

John Oliver Helps Rally 45,000 Net Neutrality Comments To FCC

Comedian John Oliver, host of HBO's Last Week Tonight.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 2:53 pm

Things are running smoothly now, but the Federal Communications Commission's public commenting system was so waylaid by people writing in on Monday that the agency had to send out a few tweets saying "technical difficulties" due to heavy traffic affected its servers.

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Arts
10:34 am
Tue June 3, 2014

Ringing In The 53rd International Carillon Festival This Week

Credit Carillon-Rees.org/SCVB

Springfield will play host to a world class music event starting Wednesday.   The International Carillon Festival brings some of the best on the instrument to Washington Park.  

Springfield Park District Carillonneur Robin Austin will be among the performers, along with Christian McWhirter, who researched music to be performed Wednesday night, a program titled "Lincoln and the Music He Loved."

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Book Reviews
10:32 am
Tue June 3, 2014

'Kingfisher' Girls Will Dance Their Way Into Your Heart

I'm completely confident in stating, without an ounce of hyperbole, that this is the best fairy tale retelling I've ever read.

I don't say this lightly. I've lived and breathed fairy tales for as long as I can remember. Fairy tales were an alphabet for me, and subversive retellings were the language in which I found my favorite poems, short fiction and novels. And Genevieve Valentine's The Girls at the Kingfisher Club, in setting "The 12 Dancing Princesses" in Prohibition-era New York, uses this language to sing jazz standards and teach me the Charleston.

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Author Interviews
2:28 am
Tue June 3, 2014

'The Director' Offers A Glimpse Into The Digital Underground

David Ignatius is a columnist for the Washington Post who has covered both the CIA and the Middle East. The Director is his ninth book.
W.W. Norton

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 10:09 am

A year ago this week, The Guardian and The Washington Post first published stories that came out of revelations from NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

The leaks brought new focus onto U.S. intelligence agencies themselves — and how they keep their secrets safe. The same themes come up in a new spy thriller from author and veteran Post columnist David Ignatius.

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Author Interviews
4:21 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

'How Not To Be Wrong' In Math Class? Add A Dose Of Skepticism

Rudyanto Wijaya iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 10:01 pm

In How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking, University of Wisconsin professor Jordan Ellenberg celebrates the virtues of mathematics, especially when they're taught well. He writes that a math teacher has to be a guide to good reasoning, and "a math course that fails do so is essentially teaching the student to be a very slow, buggy version of Microsoft Excel. And, let's be frank, that really is what many of our math courses are doing."

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Book News & Features
3:36 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Amazon's Pricing Dispute Sets Book Expo Buzzing

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 11:02 am

The dispute between retail giant Amazon and publisher Hachette was big news at Book Expo America. Writers, publishers and agents are wondering what the rift could mean for the future of books.

The Salt
3:07 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Sandwich Monday: Caffeinated Beef Jerky

You can really taste the sports!
NPR

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 4:01 pm

Today's fitness nuts (and caffeine junkies) have all sorts of energy foods at their disposal: Powerbars, Sport Beans, actual Fitness NutsTM.

But until now, athletes or office workers who wanted their caffeine in the form of desiccated meat were out of luck.

Enter Perky Jerky.

Mike: This is disappointing. I assumed Perky Jerky was made from Couric meat.

Eva: I enjoy this jerky with freshly milked Five Hour Energy drink.

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Theater
2:09 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

'Raisin In The Sun' Revival: A Uniquely American Story Is Back On Broadway

Denzel Washington plays Walter Lee, the role played by Sidney Poitier in the 1959 Broadway production of A Raisin in the Sun. Sophie Okonedo, known for her Academy Award nomination for Hotel Rwanda, plays Ruth Younger in her New York stage debut.
Brigitte Lacombe

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 3:05 pm

Denzel Washington and LaTanya Richardson Jackson have received rave reviews for their starring roles in the Broadway revival of A Raisin in the Sun. The play by Lorraine Hansberry debuted on Broadway in 1959 and was adapted to a film two years later. The current production ends its run on June 15.

"I'm in tears because it has truly been the highlight of my theatrical career," Jackson tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

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Behind Closed Doors
10:48 am
Mon June 2, 2014

'Drunk Mom' Tackles New Motherhood And Old Addictions

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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U.S.
10:48 am
Mon June 2, 2014

'Harvest Of Shame': Farm Workers Struggle With Poverty 50 Years On

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 11:35 am

The documentary Harvest of Shame was revolutionary in its raw portrayal of poverty amongst migrant farm workers. NPR's Elizabeth Blair discusses the film's legacy and the state of migrant work today.

Race
4:28 am
Mon June 2, 2014

#WeNeedDiverseBooks Campaign Comes To Inaugural BookCon

A woman holds a #WeNeedDiverseBooks sign up at the Oakland Public Library in California.
Courtesy of Oakland Public Library

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 3:54 pm

When the organizers of the publishing industry's annual trade convention in New York City announced that one day would be open to the public, they hoped to build buzz and excitement for books in the social media age. The inaugural BookCon last Saturday would be filled with panels, author stalking and autograph opps for the Twitter set.

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Arts
10:48 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

42nd Street At The Little Theatre On The Square

Credit thelittletheatre.org

Sullivan, Illinois is quite a distance from Broadway.  But this small east central Illinois community is the unlikely home of the only professional theatre between Chicago and St. Louis.   The Little Theatre On The Square has been home to quality productions for nearly 60 years.  

Starting this week, another great show is on the schedule and it features Springfield's own Gus Gordon.  He'll play Julian Marsh in 42nd Street.  

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Television
5:08 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

In 'Fargo,' A Deaf Actor Gets His Chance To Be Wicked

Mr. Numbers (Adam Goldberg) signs to Mr. Wrench, played by Russell Harvard, in the sixth episode of the TV show Fargo.
Chris Large FX Networks

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 10:01 am

The second episode of Fargo, a TV show inspired by the 1996 Coen brothers film, opens ominously. A drum kit crashes as a beat-up old sedan speeds through snowy, rural Minnesota. Two hit men, known simply as Mr. Numbers and Mr. Wrench, are investigating a murder.

The two communicate with American Sign Language. Actor Russell Harvard, the kinetic presence behind Mr. Wrench, was born deaf.

He's been acting since he was a child.

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Author Interviews
4:13 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

'Remember Me Like This': A Family Rebuilds In Tragedy's Aftermath

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 7:21 am

For all of the novels that have been penned about dramatic kidnappings and abductions, few tell of what life is like after a loved one's return. That's where Bret Anthony Johnston's book, Remember Me Like This, begins.

It follows the Campbell family in a small town in Texas as their son Justin is returned four years after his disappearance. Rather than focusing on the details of the abduction, Johnston tells the story of a family as they struggle to rebuild.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:11 am
Sun June 1, 2014

An Encounter With The Work Of Emil Nolde

A man walks past Emile Nolde's "Das Leben Christi" (1911/12, Life of Christ) at the Städel Museum.
Arne Dedert AFP/Getty Images

I visited the Emil Nolde (1867-1956) exhibition now up at Frankfurt's Städel Museum this past week. Nolde's paintings are small, sketch-like, personal, and serious. They are authentic: one person doing what he obviously needs to do and making no bones about the fact.

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Author Interviews
6:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

'Explorers' Search For The Source Of The World's Longest River

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 11:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In 1856, two British explorers, Richard Burton and John Speke, set out on a journey for the history books to find the source of the longest river in the world - the Nile. The trip would lead them through some of the most remote and uncharted parts of the African continent.

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Author Interviews
6:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Rick Springfield On Divorce, God And The Loch Ness Monster

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 5:09 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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