Arts

Monkey See
10:52 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Desk, Set: Seth Meyers Lands In Late Night Very Safely

Actress Amy Poehler during an interview with host Seth Meyers on the premiere of Meyers' Late Night.
Peter Kramer NBC

The best thing about late-night TV can also be the trickiest.

On the fringes of TV's big stage, shows airing after midnight can be a home for invention; a place where quirky personalities and developing talent can try things with the potential for massive success or demoralizing failure with relatively low stakes.

That history — and its potential for greatness — may be one reason why Seth Meyers' funny, well-paced, completely professional debut Monday as the new host of NBC's 12:35 a.m. Late Night show nevertheless left me a little underwhelmed.

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Code Switch
10:18 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Are Americans Tired Of 'Arrogant British' TV Personalities?

Piers Morgan poses for a portrait backstage during a 2011 press tour.
Chris Pizzello AP

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 2:24 pm

When the interviewer for BBC Radio finally reached me Monday to talk about the failure of Piers Morgan's 9 p.m. interview show on CNN, she basically had one question, asked many different ways.

Are Americans finally tired of arrogant British TV personalities?

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Monkey See
7:46 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Bob And Linda Read Internet Movie Reviews, Part Seven: Dallas Buyers Club

Bob And Linda Read Internet Movie Reviews: Dallas Buyers Club
NPR

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 4:33 pm

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This I Believe 2014
7:35 am
Tue February 25, 2014

The Sneetches

Gabrielle Gardner - Southeast HS
Credit Dan LoGrasso / WUIS

I believe that Sneetches are Sneetches. This probably sounds ridiculous to most people, but it is a belief that has greatly affected my outlook on life. In the children’s story “The Sneetches” by Dr. Seuss there is a very important lesson about people and their differences. In this story, there are Sneetches that live on the beach (or the beaches, as Dr. Seuss would say).  Some of these Sneetches were born with big stars on their bellies while others hadn’t anything on theirs.

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The Two-Way
6:23 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Book News: Bernanke Writing A Book On The Fed And The Great Recession

Ben Bernanke is seen leaving his Washington, D.C., office on Jan. 31, his last day as chairman of the Federal Reserve.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 9:24 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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New In Paperback
6:03 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Feb. 23-28: A Migrant Mother, A Lost Twin And A Human Fly

*Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Technology
4:11 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Online, Researcher Says, Teens Do What They've Always Done

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 9:04 am

Researcher danah boyd is obsessed with how teenagers use the Internet. For the legions of adults who are worried about them, that's a good thing.

With a Ph.D from the University of California, Berkeley, and a masters from MIT, and as a senior researcher with Microsoft, boyd is something of a star in the world of social media. For her new book It's Complicated, she spent about eight years studying teenagers and how they interact online. She says she wrote the book in part to help parents, educators and journalists relax. "The kids are all right," she says.

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Remembrances
4:11 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Actor Harold Ramis, Who Also Wrote And Directed, Dies At 69

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 7:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And this morning, we're remembering comedian Harold Ramis. Ramis was probably best known for his time on screen alongside Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd in "Ghostbusters." He and Murray also teamed up as best buddies who have no business joining the Army in the movie "Stripes." Here's Ramis in his deadpan performance as Russell Ziskey.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STRIPES")

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Architecture
2:38 am
Tue February 25, 2014

A College Project That Imagines A Floating City For Oil Workers

View of central crossing of the central hub island, one of dozens of man-made islands envisioned by Rice University architecture students. The islands would serve as a floating city for oil workers off the coast of Brazil.
Rice School of Architecture

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:58 am

Imagine you're in a college-level architecture class and your assignment is to come up with an idea so revolutionary that it could be considered an important advance in industrial design.

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Author Interviews
2:35 am
Tue February 25, 2014

'A' Is For Anxiety, 'G' Is For Guilt: The ABCs Of Breast Cancer

izusek iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 7:06 am

A few years ago, Morning Edition interviewed President Obama at the White House. At the time, it was a major news story, but there was another story going on behind the scenes.

Madhulika Sikka, now the executive editor of NPR News, had accompanied the team to the White House, and while NPR's Steve Inskeep was talking to the president, Sikka was waiting on a phone call from her doctor. She had been warned a few days before that the news might not be good.

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The Picture Show
4:48 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Here Are Some Photos A Robot Decided I Should Remember

NPR

We've all heard the arguments that our lives have become irrevocably mediated by screens and camera phones — that the more we document and publish moments, the less we actually live them. So when Elise Hu over at All Tech Considered got a Narrative Clip in the mail, I was curious.

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Remembrances
4:11 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Harold Ramis: A Big-Screen Comedy Nerd, Eager To Please

Ghostbusters, starring Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis, was one of Ramis' many successful comedies. The writer, director, actor and producer died Monday; he had co-written and planned to star in the long-awaited Ghostbusters III.
Corus Entertainment / Sony Pictures

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 7:02 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
3:00 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Gil Shaham And When The World 'Got Much Smaller, Much Faster'

Star violinist Gil Shaham, whose newest recording project surveys the wildly different violin concertos of the 1930s.
Luke Ratray Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 7:02 pm

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All Tech Considered
3:00 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Cool Or Creepy? A Clip-On Camera Can Capture Every Moment

The Narrative clip is a lightweight wearable camera, capable of shooting 5-megapixel images. You clip it to your lapel and it shoots two photos a minute.
Jim Tuttle NPR

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 10:45 am

With digital cameras and camera phones everywhere, there are few moments we don't document. But some designers still think we're missing the opportunity to capture some important, simple moments. The solution: the Narrative Clip, a wearable camera that automatically and silently snaps an image every 30 seconds.

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The Salt
1:36 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Wrecking Ball

The Wrecking Ball
NPR

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 3:13 pm

A fast-food secret menu is like Up Up Down Down Left Right Left Right B A Start for eating: Once you know that it exists, it changes your life for the better, forever.

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All Tech Considered
1:15 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

If You Think You're Anonymous Online, Think Again

Sure, you can try doing your Internet browsing this way, but we can't promise that it will help you protect your personal data online.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 10:00 am

Investigative reporter Julia Angwin was curious what Google knew about her, so she asked the company for her search data. "It turns out I had been doing about 26,000 Google searches a month ... and I was amazed at how revealing they were," she tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

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Black History Month: #AfroGlobal
1:14 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Black, British And 'Brain Drained': Playwright Takes Charge In Baltimore

Kwame Kwei-Armah, Artistic Director of Baltimore's Center Stage Theater.
Richard Anderson ©2011 Richard Anderson Photogra

Actor and playwright Kwame Kwei-Armah was born in Britain to immigrant parents from Grenada. His dad worked as a factory worker and his mother worked three jobs to send him to private school in the hope he would become a lawyer. "She wanted me to contribute to the upliftment of my community," he tells NPR's Michel Martin.

In 2003, he became the first black Briton to stage a play in London's prestigious West End theater district with his award-winning piece "Elmina's Kitchen." The play tackled gun crime, displacement and racism in East London.

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Code Switch
1:03 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Blood And Water: Illustrating Langston Hughes' 'Rivers'

Afua Richardson

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 1:22 pm

NPR Books and Code Switch are winding down Black History Month in style: We've asked three of our favorite comic artists to illustrate something — a person, a poem, a play, a book, a song — that inspires them. Afua Richardson is an award-winning illustrator who's worked for Image, Marvel and DC Comics. She's chosen Langston Hughes' great poem "The Negro Speaks of Rivers." And you can see Richardson's video, created from these panels, here.

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The Two-Way
12:14 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Harold Ramis, 'Ghostbuster' Actor And 'Groundhog Day' Director, Dies

Harold Ramis in 2009. He died Monday.
Jim Prisching AP

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 4:10 pm

Harold Ramis, who was in the director's chair for the comedies Groundhog Day and Caddyshack and was one of the stars of the Ghostbuster movies, has died. He was 69.

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Monkey See
8:06 am
Mon February 24, 2014

A New Shine On Old Problems: How to Clean The Nastiest Stains

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 9:01 pm

It's hard to take not one but two genres that are typically thought of as staples of old-fashioned "media for women" – the advice column and the collection of household hints – and make them feel at all relevant to women now, who may or may not have time for all the fussing that perfect housekeeping ideally entails and may or may not live lives in which it's their responsibility, or their priority.

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This I Believe 2014
7:35 am
Mon February 24, 2014

Great Sacrifices Give Great Rewards

Pauline Kersjes - Springfield HS
Credit Dan LoGrasso / WUIS

    It is July 31st. I am standing in an airport far away from here. I turn around for the last time and see my parents and three sisters waving goodbye with tears running down their faces. I have not cried a single tear today. I think the tears are all gone. I cried enough yesterday. I am way too excited to cry anyway. Today it is finally going to happen. I have been waiting for this moment for almost two years. I believe that this year is going to be worth it.

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The Two-Way
7:01 am
Mon February 24, 2014

Book News: Byline Tally Shows There's Still Gender Bias In Book Reviewing

Mutlu Kurtbas iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 9:01 am

This post was updated at 9:45 a.m. ET

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Movie Reviews
5:23 am
Mon February 24, 2014

'Child's Pose' Feels 'Terrifyingly Authentic'

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 6:34 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film will be handed out in a couple weeks. And though Romania's "Child's Pose" is not one of the finalists, film critic Kenneth Turan says its as good as any of them.

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Business
4:05 am
Mon February 24, 2014

British TV Criticized For Airing E-Cigarette Commercial

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 6:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the first commercial for an e-cigarette has aired on British television - five decades after ads for real cigarettes were banned there.

Vicki Barker reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

VICKI BARKER, BYLINE: The ad shows two fit, attractive 20-somethings running through a darkened cityscape, leaping into the future on a cloud of vapor.

(SOUNDBITE OF AD)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Pure satisfaction for smokers: Vype e-cigarettes - experience the breakthrough.

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Monkey See
10:08 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Oh, Lady Edith

Laura Carmichael as Lady Edith, whose rather appalling luck seems destined to follow her.
Nick Briggs PBS

[This piece contains information about the plot of Downton Abbey, up to and including Sunday night's fourth-season finale.]

Another season of Downton Abbey has come to a close, and once again, Lady Edith is unlucky. Unlucky in love, unlucky in life. She's unluckier than Bates, and he went to jail for something he didn't do, for what certainly felt like a really, really long time. She's unluckier than Matthew, and he's quite deceased.

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Author Interviews
1:26 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

'Cut Me Loose': After Exile, A Young Woman's Journey In 'Sin'

Footsteps and co-producer of the It Gets Besser project, both of which help support people who have decided to leave ultra-Orthodoxy." href="/post/cut-me-loose-after-exile-young-womans-journey-sin" class="noexit lightbox">
Leah Vincent is a board member of Footsteps and co-producer of the It Gets Besser project, both of which help support people who have decided to leave ultra-Orthodoxy.
Ned & Aya Rosen Leah Vincent

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 12:44 pm

Leah Vincent was born into the Yeshivish community, an ultra-Orthodox sect of Judaism, in Pittsburgh.

"Yeshivish Judaism life is defined by religious law," Vincent tells NPR's Arun Rath. "We keep extra-strict laws of kosher, observe the Sabbath every week, maintain a separation of the sexes and a degree of isolation from the outside world."

When she was 16, she was caught exchanging letters with a male friend. Contact with men is forbidden in her sect, and she was cast out from her community.

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All Tech Considered
12:02 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

A Father Plays Call Of Duty With His Son, Watched By Thousands

Jason Munkel and his father stream their Call of Duty games online every night. In the past year, they've gained more than 120,000 followers.
Twitch/Activision

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 2:59 pm

Jason Munkel and his father Bill are 39 years apart in age, but since last year, they've been sitting down together to play Call of Duty: Ghosts almost every night.

They also broadcast their gameplay to more than 120,000 followers, who watch the father-son duo pursue and shoot enemies on the screen, and talk to them during the game. Sometimes they do this for six to seven hours a day, and their audience has grown dramatically in just one year, though not all watch every day.

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Movie Reviews
11:08 am
Sun February 23, 2014

A 'Tale' That's A Labor Of Love, But Not A Complete Success

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Book fans can be pretty picky about how Hollywood treats their favorite reads. And Hollywood can sometimes disappoint. Marc Helprin's "Winter's Tale" has been a favorite of readers since it was published in 1983. Los Angeles Times and MORNING EDITION film critic Kenneth Turan has a review of how well it works as a movie.

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Sunday Puzzle
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Famous Four-By-Fours That Aren't Trucks

NPR

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:57 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is the name of a famous person with four letters in his or her first name and four letters in the last. For each person, you'll be given initials and an anagram of the full name. You name the person.

Last week's challenge: Name a famous entertainer: two words, four letters in each word. You can rearrange these eight letters to spell the acronym of a well-known national organization, and the word that the first letter of this acronym stands for. Who's the entertainer, and what's the organization?

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Author Interviews
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

In 'Kinder Than Solitude,' History Always Haunts

Courtesy of Random House

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:57 am

Kinder Than Solitude, the latest novel from Chinese-American author Yiyun Li, examines the impact of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre on a generation of youth. Following three friends, the novel alternates between 1990s Beijing and present-day America, where two of the friends immigrated. At the heart of the story is the mysterious murder that brought the three friends together over 20 years ago, and what they're only now learning about it.

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