Arts

Law
4:17 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Court OKs Universities' Quest To Turn To More Digital Copies Of Books

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 8:43 am

A U.S. appeals court has ruled against a group of authors, deciding in favor of a consortium of universities in a case that hinged on copyright law and provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The universities had allowed Google to make digital copies of more than 10 million books so that they could be searchable by specific terms.

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Television
3:46 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Larry Wilmore Knows: Heavy Lies The Late-Night Mantle

"When I'm working on The Daily Show, I understand that I'm having a dialogue with the audience about something that is pretty charged," says Larry Wilmore. "And I'm always trying to work on: What is this really about?"
Comedy Central

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 3:13 pm

Larry Wilmore just landed the second-toughest job in TV.

The toughest gig falls to Stephen Colbert, who will replace late-night talk icon David Letterman on CBS next year. But Wilmore has been named to replace Colbert, leading a show that will tackle topics barely referenced on television: race and diversity.

And Wilmore admits to just one teeny, tiny concern about replacing Colbert: He might screw it up pretty badly. And then they'd never let another black guy host another late-night TV talk show.

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Animals
3:33 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

A Bone Collector's Basement Of Animal Skulls Sees The Light

Ray Bandar has spent six decades finding dead animals and cleaning their bones.
Lauren Sommer KQED

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:31 pm

Ray Bandar's skeletons aren't in his closet — they're in his basement. Lots of them. Specifically, 7,000 skulls stacked floor to ceiling, including those of sea lions, cheetahs, jaguars, horses, zebras and other animals.

Bandar has spent 60 years building this scientific collection of animal bones. Now, many of his skulls are on view at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, which has just opened an exhibit featuring his work.

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Author Interviews
3:04 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

John Waters Hitchhikes Across America, And Lives To Write About It

"My early films look terrible!" says filmmaker John Waters. "I didn't know what I was doing. I learned when I was doing it. I never went to film school." Waters, who is known for films such as the outlandish Pink Flamingos and Hairspray, has written a new book, Carsick.
Kathy Willens AP

Film director and writer John Waters has broken many taboos and created intentionally perverse scenarios in his films — most notably in Pink Flamingos, about a competition for the title "the filthiest person alive."

Waters, who is now 68, was looking for an adventure he could write about. So he decided to hitchhike cross-country from his home in Baltimore to his co-op apartment in San Francisco.

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Book Reviews
2:31 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

'Rise And Fall' Carries On Vagabond Adventure Tale Tradition

guldfisken via Flickr

Any novel that opens on a young American woman running a bookshop in a small town nestled in the Welsh countryside promises a glimpse into a life lived far from the madding crowd. That's the quaint plotline Tom Rachman's new novel tells uninterruptedly for the length of one brief chapter. Thereafter, Rachman returns only occasionally to the World's End bookshop and its shelves sporting idiosyncratic labels like: Artists Who Were Unpleasant to Their Spouses; History, the Dull Bits; and Books You Pretend to Have Read but Haven't.

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The Two-Way
6:32 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Book News: 'Calvin And Hobbes' Creator Returns (For A Little While)

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue June 10, 2014

A Charming Road Trip To The Past In 'Walt Before Skeezix'

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 9:16 am

Gosh all fishhooks! Fire up your flivvers and tea-carts, birds, because Drawn & Quarterly is at it again. The publisher continues its release of Gasoline Alley comics compilations with Walt Before Skeezix, a collection of some of creator Frank King's very first strips. Gasoline Alley later became known for its long-running stories and minute eye for domestic life. In this early incarnation, though, King's just drawing a jokey strip focused on four average guys who hang out in each other's garages, bonding around cars and their need for a male retreat.

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Politics
4:50 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Clinton Sought 'Tougher Deal,' But Won't Second-Guess Bergdahl Swap

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 1:38 pm

Below are excerpts from Hillary Clinton's interview Monday with NPR's Renee Montagne. Clinton's new book, Hard Choices, will be published Tuesday.

Portions of this interview will air on Morning Edition.

On running for president in 2016

HILLARY CLINTON: I have made some hard choices, and I face some hard choices. And, as I say in the book, I have not made a decision yet. ...

RENEE MONTAGNE: This is, may I say, a classic campaign book. ...

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NPR Story
4:09 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Author: 2nd Amendment's Only Sentence Generates Recurrent Debate

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:23 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We're going to hear next about the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. It's a short one.

MICHAEL WALDMAN: One sentence, lots of commas and lots of confusion.

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The Salt
2:45 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Forbidding Fruit: How America Got Turned On To The Date

How about a date?
Loomis Dean Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 2:07 pm

In 1898, the U.S. Department of Agriculture created a special department of men called Agriculture Explorers to travel the globe searching for new food crops to bring back for farmers to grow in the U.S.

"These agricultural explorers were kind of like the Indiana Joneses of the plant world," says Sarah Seekatz, a California historian who grew up in the Coachella Valley, the date capital of the U.S.

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Monkey See
4:33 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

'Working Stiff TV' — Hey, Meat And Potatoes Are Pretty Tasty

Mary McDonnell stars in Major Crimes, a good solid show that preserves the ensemble created in TNT's more successful drama The Closer.
TNT

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 11:13 am

Even the snobbiest entertainment fan has got to admit it: Television is pretty good these days.

So it's easy to get distracted by talk of big-ticket dramas like Game of Thrones, The Walking Dead or Orange Is the New Black. But the fact is, there's a whole wide universe of TV shows out there that aren't trying to top critics' best-of lists, make the short list at the Emmys or get recapped on Vulture.com.

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Performing Arts
3:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Audra McDonald Racks Up The Tonys, This Time As Billie Holiday

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 5:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

There's a new queen of Broadway. Audra McDonald won her sixth Tony award last night for her betrayal of Billie Holiday in "Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, CRAZY HE CALLS ME")

AUDRA MCDONALD: (As Billie Holiday, singing) Crazy he calls me. Sure I'm crazy. Crazy in love, I'd say.

CORNISH: When she got to the stage to accept her Tony, the audience at Radio City Music Hall was on its feet. The standing ovation that initially drowning her out.

MCDONALD: Thank you so much. Thank you.

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Movie Interviews
2:33 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Invisible 'Supermensch' Avoided The Spotlight While Making Others Famous

In Supermensch, talent agent Shep Gordon recalls arriving in Los Angeles in 1968, dropping acid and getting slugged by a woman who later identified herself as Janis Joplin.
Dogwoof Films

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 3:48 pm

Shep Gordon's job is managing musicians and chefs and turning them into stars. Gordon created celebrities out of the likes of Alice Cooper and Anne Murray, but he says fame isn't necessarily a good thing.

"I made excuses to myself for how I made a living and tried to do it as honorably as I could, but I can't say that I'm proud," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. " ... If you make someone famous, they have to pay a price."

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The Salt
2:18 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Sandwich Monday: Taco Bell's Quesarito

Don't be fooled. This is no average burrito.
NPR

When you bite into a traditional burrito, your teeth have to endure one or two boring seconds of tortilla before they reach the filling within.

Taco Bell, continuing its mission to solve all of life's problems, has fixed that with the new Quesarito. It's a burrito that replaces the tortilla with a cheese-filled quesadilla.

Miles: What a revolutionary idea. I'm excited to see how a burrito tastes once you add some tortilla and cheese.

Robert: It's like a soft cast for a sprained burrito.

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Music
12:13 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Laverne Cox Loves 'Trouble'

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 2:45 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
12:10 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

One Man's Search For His Personal Narrative And 'Asian Self'

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 2:45 pm

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Alex Tizon immigrated from the Philippines as a young boy when his parents — like so many before them — moved his family to the U.S. in search of a better life.

But, at some point Tizon realized that much of what he saw and heard around him told him that what he was — an Asian man — was shameful, weak and at the bottom of the manhood hierarchy.

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Food
8:38 am
Mon June 9, 2014

These 10 Summer Cookbooks Will Make The Good Life Even Better

liz west via Flickr

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 12:02 pm

Toss out the china and pick up the picnic basket! Summer cookbooks are fanciful creatures — high on whimsy and shamelessly devoted to making a good life better. For some, that means lingering in the farmers markets or gardening with the kids. For others it's indulging in some usually forbidden pleasures — the fried, the icy sweet, the charred and meaty. And for some, it means crossing oceans to sample less familiar fare — without ever leaving the porch. There's something for everyone, but all go just fine with bare toes and a sun hat.

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Monkey See
8:34 am
Mon June 9, 2014

Hugh Jackman Jumps; Tony Viewers Say, 'What?'

Hugh Jackman gave it all he had at Sunday night's Tony Awards.
Heather Wines CBS

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 2:43 pm

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Theater
8:30 am
Mon June 9, 2014

McDonald, Cranston Big Winners At 68th Tony Awards

Audra McDonald won a sixth Tony for portraying Billie Holiday in Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill. Bryan Cranston won a best actor trophy for his Broadway debut in All the Way.

The Two-Way
8:02 am
Mon June 9, 2014

2014 Tony Awards: Audra McDonald Nets A Record Sixth Win

Audra McDonald won her record sixth Tony for her portrayal of Billie Holiday in Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill.
Heather Wines CBS /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 10:20 am

When a new batch of Tonys was awarded Sunday night, Audra McDonald walked off the stage as the most decorated actress in the event's history. McDonald won for her portrayal of Billie Holiday in Lady Day at Emerson's Bar And Grill.

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Television
7:14 am
Mon June 9, 2014

More Scripted TV Shows Included In Top-10 List

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Not sure if you heard or not, but American Idol just crowned a new winner.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "AMERICAN IDOL")

RYAN SEACREST: The winner of "American Idol," season 13, is Caleb Johnson.

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The Two-Way
6:20 am
Mon June 9, 2014

Book News: Maya Angelou Remembered As Having 'The Voice Of God'

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Author Interviews
2:33 am
Mon June 9, 2014

'The Farm' Is A Terrifying Break From Reality — Or Is It?

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 3:01 pm

In the spring of 2009, British author Tom Rob Smith received a disturbing phone call from his father. "And he was crying," Smith tells NPR's David Greene. "He never cries. And he said to me, 'You've got to come to Sweden. Your mom has suffered a psychotic episode, and she's in an asylum.' "

Then, Smith's mother called. She had just been released from the psychiatric hospital in Sweden, and she said everything his father had told him was a lie. "She wasn't mad. My dad was involved in a criminal conspiracy, and she was flying to London to tell me the truth."

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Movie Interviews
2:53 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Disney Translates 'Frozen' Into A More Formal Arabic

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:43 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And what about the drug he's on right now to help him kick his addiction to Vicodin? I asked him how long he thinks he'll have to take that. Three months, he says. Maybe a year, maybe more. And that's OK with him. >>MARTIN: If you can't get the lyrics to Disney's megahit musical, "Frozen," out of your head, you are definitely not alone. Disney has dubbed the musical into 41 languages.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LET IT GO")

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: (Singing in foreign language).

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Movie Interviews
2:53 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

'Obvious Child' Tells An Abortion Story With Rom-Com Heart

In The Obvious Child, 20-something comic Donna (Jenny Slate) finds herself pregnant after a one-night stand with Max (Jake Lacy), a young professional who's not remotely her type.
Courtesy of A24

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 5:34 pm

Obvious Child's story goes like this: Boy dumps girl; girl is sad; girl rebounds with nice guy she meets at a bar, and then things get complicated. Comedian Jenny Slate plays Donna, the main character:

"Donna's in her late 20s. She's a comedian in Brooklyn. ... It's going pretty well for her at the start of the film. [But then] she ends up getting dumped and fired and then pregnant all in time for Valentine's Day. ... It all really starts to circle the drain a little bit."

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Theater
10:46 am
Sun June 8, 2014

While Broadway Sings Its Praise, The Wigmaker Remains Unsung

Wigs play an especially important role in the drama Casa Valentina. The play features Reed Birney (standing) as Charlotte, one of several male characters who spend their weekends dressing and living as women.
Matthew Murphy

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 5:34 pm

Every time you see a Broadway show, chances are a lot of the actors are wearing wigs.

Sunday night at the 68th Annual Tony Awards, Broadway's highest honors will be presented in a ceremony at Radio City Music Hall. Awards will go to actors, actresses, set and lighting designers, but not the people who make the wigs the stars wear, even though the wigs are an essential part of theater craft.

Essential, and yet often invisible, says Jason P. Hayes, the wig designer for Harvey Fierstein's Tony-nominated play, Casa Valentina.

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Education
7:06 am
Sun June 8, 2014

Words Unlocked Free Voices Of Young Offenders

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 5:34 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Aaron Martin had a problem with crystal meth. And last year, at the age of 19, it was part of what landed him in a correctional facility with a sentence of 46 months, although his actual crime was texting explicit pictures of his underage girlfriend.

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Book News & Features
4:48 am
Sun June 8, 2014

Capturing A Dreamlike Moment In 'Time Present'

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 5:34 pm

Weekend Edition is kicking off a series of conversations with authors who'll recommend great reads for our listeners.

This week, we're paging through Time Present and Time Past, a new book from Irish author Deirdre Madden. It takes its name from T.S. Eliot's poem "Burnt Norton," and it takes place in 2006, just before the Irish financial crisis.

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The Two-Way
9:32 am
Sat June 7, 2014

Watch: First Lady Michelle Obama Delivers Eulogy For Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou
Nancy Robinson/Maya Angelou's Office AP

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 1:04 pm

This morning at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., family, friends and dignitaries gathered to pay their final respects to author and poet Maya Angelou, who died last week.

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Books
7:41 am
Sat June 7, 2014

Remembering The Short Fiction Of Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 10:58 am

Gabriel Garcia Marquez and I have a few things in common: We both discovered Kafka while studying in Bogotá, and we both knew we wanted to write forever after borrowing copies of The Metamorphosis. Reading that little novel — an exercise in the seemingly endless possibilities of fiction — proved to be a transformative experience for both of us.

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