Arts

Movies
4:03 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

In 'Manuscripts,' A Barred Filmmaker Considers Dissident Art

One of the uncredited members of the cast of Manuscripts Don't Burn.
Kino Lorber

Iranian writer-director Mohammad Rasoulof is known for such lovely yet elusive allegories as White Meadows, but his response to being barred from filmmaking has not been to recede further into symbolism. His Manuscripts Don't Burn, smuggled out of Iran last year, is direct and unflinching.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

'Burning Bush' Finds The Fuel For A Desperate Act

Jenovéfa Boková (as Vlaďka Charouzová), Adrian Jastraban (as Vladimír Charouz), and Tatiana Pauhofová (as Dagmar Burešová) in Burning Bush.
Kino Lorber

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 12:09 pm

I was a college sophomore in London when Jan Palach, a shy young Czech student, set himself on fire in Prague's Wenceslas Square in January 1969. The British campus revolt was in full flow, but the images of Palach's burning body, and the mass silent vigils that followed his death a few days later, made me feel how puny were the stakes of our revolution next to the failed protest against Soviet occupation, following the Prague Spring, that triggered Palach's desperate final act.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Familiarity But No Contempt: The Sequel Says 'Jump,' You Say 'Oh, Hi!'

Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill return in the absolutely expected sequel 22 Jump Street.
Glen Wilson Sony Pictures

If there's any doubt that 22 Jump Street is a cartoon dressed in live-action clothing, it should disappear completely when Channing Tatum's lovably lunkheaded Detective Jenko is puzzling over an obvious set of connected clues when – DING! – the answer suddenly comes to him. That "Ding" is literal – the sound is just an office noise from somewhere in the formerly abandoned Vietnamese church where his investigative unit is based.

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Author Interviews
3:38 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Former BP CEO: 'Glass Closet' Still Holds Many Gay Workers Back

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 7:30 pm

"It was time to leave the building."

So begins a new book by John Browne, former CEO of the energy giant BP. But that sentence could easily have read: "It was time to leave the closet."

During his 12 years as CEO, he never discussed his sexuality in the workplace. That changed in 2007, when his relationship with a male escort was exposed and Browne resigned amid an ensuing scandal. At the time, he said in a statement, "I have always regarded my sexuality as a personal matter, to be kept private."

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Politics
3:01 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Hillary Clinton: The Fresh Air Interview

Hillary Clinton's new memoir, Hard Choices, outlines her four years as secretary of state under President Obama. She talks about her vote for the Iraq War, women's rights and political "gamers."
Patrick Smith Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 11:40 am

Hillary Clinton is on a national book tour for her new memoir, Hard Choices. The book outlines her four years as secretary of state during President Obama's first term, when she met with leaders all over the world.

One of her priorities was to campaign for gay rights and women's rights. She says she saw the "full gamut" on how women were treated, and in some cases it was "painful to observe."

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Parallels
2:38 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

In A Sunny Britain, Would We Read Classics Like 'David Coppertone'?

On a glorious but rare day, a woman relaxes on a bench in the rose garden in Hyde Park on Monday in London, England. The book she's reading might have turned out much different if London were known for fair weather rather than fog.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 3:48 am

I'm not sure that cities like Miami and Rio de Janeiro truly appreciate the sun. They clearly enjoy the sun, what with their beach volleyball games and their fruity cocktails. But to really appreciate the sun, I think you have to live in a place that gets dark by 4 p.m. in the winter. A place where a typical summer day involves drizzle. A place, in short, like London.

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Shots - Health News
1:36 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Cool Kids Lose, Though It May Take A Few Years

As Lindsay Lohan's character (far left) learned in the movie Mean Girls, popularity comes at a price.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:07 am

Parents, teachers and cheesy after-school specials have long tried to convince kids that being cool and popular isn't all that it's cracked up to be. Now scientists are chiming in as well.

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Legendary Actress Ruby Dee Dies At 91

Actress Ruby Dee and director Spike Lee attend a special 20th anniversary screening of Do the Right Thing, in New York, in 2009. Dee died Wednesday at age 91.
Peter Kramer AP

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:58 pm

Editors' Note: An earlier version of this post, as well as an accompanying breaking news alert, incorrectly stated that Ruby Dee had won an Oscar for her role in American Gangster. Dee was nominated for the award but did not win.

Ruby Dee, an actress and civil rights activist who built a career on stage and screen at a time when African-Americans had few such opportunities, has died at age 91.

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Around the Nation
11:52 am
Thu June 12, 2014

How Dreaming Big Led One TV Star To His Big Break

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:31 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. You might have heard of television personality, Cesar Millan. You might know him as the Dog Whisperer or from his hit TV show "Cesar 911," which airs on Nat Geo Wild. But what you might not know is that before the TV fame, the grooming stores, the dog psychology center, he was a homeless, undocumented immigrant from Mexico with a dream. Our friends at All Things Considered capture the story of how his career took off as part of their series called My Big Break.

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Ask Me Another
8:11 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Emily The Puzzle Slayer

Through the wonders of technology, actor Tom Lenk — who played Andrew on Buffy the Vampire Slayer -- serves as V.I.P. Emily Nussbaum's lifeline during her quiz at The Bell House in Brooklyn, NY.
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 10:31 am

We quiz Emily Nussbaum, TV critic for The New Yorker, on her favorite show: Buffy The Vampire Slayer. Why Buffy?

"Buffy was the first show that I actually became a deranged fan that would frighten the people involved with the show," said Nussbaum.

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Ask Me Another
8:09 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Compound Fractures

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 10:31 am

Compound words combine shorter ones, like "milkshake." The answers in this game seem compound, but aren't: you get a floor covering ("carpet") by combining a vehicle (car) with the family dog (pet).

Heard in Episode 319: Two Can Slay That Game

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Ask Me Another
8:07 am
Thu June 12, 2014

This Means Wiki-War

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 10:31 am

There have been so many Wikipedia "edit wars," that there's an entire Wikipedia page dedicated to them. ("The Eagles" vs. "Eagles"?) In this game about notable edit wars, however, everyone's a winner.

Heard in Episode 319: Two Can Slay That Game

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Ask Me Another
8:07 am
Thu June 12, 2014

This, That Or The Other VII

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 4:12 pm

We give you a word; you tell us which of three categories it belongs to. This week's categories: animals, world capitals, and (lest we forget to be nerdy) Lord of the Rings characters.

Heard in Episode 319: Two Can Slay That Game

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Ask Me Another
8:06 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Emily Nussbaum: A Critical Mass Of Good TV

Emily Nussbaum's critique on Lena Dunham's HBO show, Girls, for The New Yorker: "Like any groundbreaking TV, it shows the audience something new, then dares it to look away."
Neilson Barnard Getty Images for The New Yorker

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 7:09 am

Emily Nussbaum — the New Yorker critic — has a keen eye out for TV shows that tend to go off the beaten path. "Sometimes those are the shows that feel off-putting and disorienting, like Louie, or shows that do things that haven't been done previously, so people don't know how to watch them," says the writer who's unafraid of a small screen challenge. "I try to find those kinds of shows. But I've changed my mind about things a million times."

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Ask Me Another
8:05 am
Thu June 12, 2014

I Sense A Theme Music

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 10:31 am

Who could forget Celine Dion's Titanic's love anthem, "My Heart Will Go On"? We wish we could. In this game, identify movies from their famous soundtrack moments.

Heard in Episode 319: Two Can Slay That Game

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Ask Me Another
8:05 am
Thu June 12, 2014

P.S. I Love You

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 10:31 am

The final round is a postscript to our show, so in this game, we took that idea literally: all the answers are two-word names or phrases with the initials "P.S." Which gal "got married" in a 1986 film?

Heard in Episode 319: Two Can Slay That Game

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Arts
6:56 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Legendary Musician Hardly A Household Name

Alejandro Escovedo
Credit Marina Chavez

Austin based musician Alejandro Escovedo appears in Springfield Saturday night as part of Bedrock 66 Live. While he could be described as legendary in the music community, he is not a household name. Saturday's show is at Donnie's Homespun.  Tickets at Bedrock66.com

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Book News: Charles Wright, Who Writes Of God And Nature, To Be Poet Laureate

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Standing 2 Feet From The President Ought To Be More Exciting

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 9:13 am

Picture the following scenario: you are a Secret Service agent being paid to protect the President's life, when suddenly you feel an urgent call of nature. Well, that's exactly what happened to Dan Emmett on a state visit to Europe with Bill Clinton during the 1990s.

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Business
4:12 am
Thu June 12, 2014

'Lego Movie' Caught In Amazon's Battle With Warner Home Video

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 8:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, BYLINE: We begin NPR's Business News with another Amazon standoff. Amazon, the giant online retailer, is in a battle with Warner Home Video. Amazon says it deserves a bigger piece of the pie, and until the company gets it it's refusing to sell Warner's forthcoming DVDs. Here's NPR's Mandalit del Barco.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "EVERYTHING IS AWESOME")

TEGAN AND SARA: (Singing) Everything is awesome...

MANDALIT DEL BARCO: For fans of "The Lego Movie" hoping to order a DVD through Amazon, everything is not so awesome.

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Fine Art
2:08 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Meet The Models: Exhibit Explores The People Behind The Paintings

In 1930, Grant Wood had his sister Nan pose for American Gothic. "The public reaction to the painting was so rough on her that her brother Grant felt bad for her," curator Elizabeth Botten says.
Art Institute of Chicago, Friends of American Art Collection AP

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:17 pm

An artist friend, Virginia Isbell, once asked me to pose for a quick pastel sketch in her Paris studio. I was flattered — and amazed to be on that side of a work of art. Never have I been looked at so intently, except by a parent or a lover. I was being fixed, examined, absorbed. And, for all the intensity, there was absolutely nothing personal about it.

I was an object to be replicated. Her eyes went from my face to her sketchpad, my nose, my eyes, mouth, chin — sketched in pastel in 20 minutes. It was fun. But it felt as if something had been taken from me.

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Book Reviews
3:00 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Summer Reading: Three Books To Take You To New Frontiers

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 5:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. You don't need a ticket to travel this summer. Our reviewer, Alan Cheuse, has packed a small bag of books that he says will send you to Alaska, Siberia and Tasmania. Here's Alan on three debut works.

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Author Interviews
3:00 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

In The Cockpit, Gazing At Stars: Saint-Exupéry's Life In Pictures

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 3:20 pm

Children's book author and illustrator Peter Sís takes grand adventures on the page. He's done books about Galileo, Charles Darwin, Christopher Columbus — and now, he's turned his pen and brush to the life of the French writer Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, best known for his book The Little Prince.

Saint-Exupéry was also famous as a pioneering aviator who wrote several adult books on the theme of flight. But after he disappeared during a reconnaissance mission over southern France in 1944, it was The Little Prince that lived on after him.

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Author Interviews
11:24 am
Wed June 11, 2014

The Difficulty And Drama Of Building A Top Black Magazine

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:10 pm

This year marks the 50th anniversary of many pivotal events in the civil rights movement, and to commemorate "Freedom Summer," Tell Me More is diving into books that explore that theme.

Back in 1969, faces of color doing any job in major media were few and far between. But that was the year an unlikely group of businessmen and salesmen decided to create a magazine specifically for black women: Essence.

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Beauty Shop
11:24 am
Wed June 11, 2014

What Does Cantor's Loss Say About The Republicans' Future?

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Economy
11:24 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Could Detroit's Automakers Save Its Art Treasures?

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Let's turn now to Detroit where the city's effort to come back from bankruptcy just got a boost. The Big Three automakers - Ford, General Motors and Chrysler - have put down some serious financial muscle to help save the Detroit Institute of Arts, the DIA - $26 million to be exact. That could help save the city from having to sell the art to satisfy creditors. It's not just art admirers who are keeping their eye on this deal. People, from retirees worrying about their pensions to the creditors Detroit owes, could be affected by this.

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The Protojournalist
10:13 am
Wed June 11, 2014

5 TV Shows That Deserve Another Chance

LeVar Burton, the face of Reading Rainbow.
From the Reading Rainbow website

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 8:05 pm

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The Two-Way
6:56 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Book News: Appeals Court Rules Digital Library Doesn't Violate Copyright Law

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 7:01 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Wed June 11, 2014

'Girl With All The Gifts' Is A Thriller With (Sharp, Scary) Teeth

Warning: Mild spoilers ahead!

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Law
4:17 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Court OKs Universities' Quest To Turn To More Digital Copies Of Books

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 8:43 am

A U.S. appeals court has ruled against a group of authors, deciding in favor of a consortium of universities in a case that hinged on copyright law and provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The universities had allowed Google to make digital copies of more than 10 million books so that they could be searchable by specific terms.

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