Arts

Movies
10:37 am
Fri October 4, 2013

'The Fade': Four Barbers, Three Continents, One Film

London barber Faisal Abdu'Allah cuts director Andy Mundy-Castle's hair.
Big Bright Films

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 7:35 am

The Fade — a documentary by London filmmaker Andy Mundy-Castle — follows the lives of four barbers on three continents, all at the top of their game. New Jersey barber Johnny Castellanos also known as 'Hollywood' is a barber to the stars. His client list includes rapper and businessman Jay Z and artists and athletes like Pharrell Williams and Amar'e Stoudemire.

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Monkey See
9:38 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Breaking Bad,' Bad Boys, Bad Choices

This guy and his dog are doing all they can to contribute to the world of Grand Theft Auto V.
AP
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

First things first: FEAR NOT. This is a non-spoilery Breaking Bad discussion. If you don't believe me, consider that even two of the people in the room haven't seen the whole run of the series, so if there were spoilers, we'd know (and get punched). Instead, we try to put the themes of the series in the context of a bigger discussion about what kinds of protagonists we can and cannot root for, what kinds of television are growing and shrinking, and what kinds of conversations we want to have about the shows we love.

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Book News: Study Says Reading (Literary) Fiction Can Boost Social Skills

Jesmyn Ward won the 2011 National Book Award for Fiction for her book Salvage the Bones.
Tina Fineberg AP

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 10:33 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Arts & Life
4:06 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Parents Of Child Prodigies Face Difficult Choices

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 9:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This week on the program, we've been talking to and about prodigies: children with extraordinary abilities far beyond their age. Yesterday, we talked about how hard it is to find the right balance, encouraging these kids without setting expectations too high, something that can hurt them later as adults. This is largely up to their parents, who face some incredibly difficult choices. And today we'll hear from two parents: the mother of a teenage computer wonder and the father of a pint-sized tennis phenom.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Movie Reviews
4:06 am
Fri October 4, 2013

'Gravity' Is Out Of this World Twice Over

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 9:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The space shuttle is the vehicle at the center of the new movie "Gravity," which lands in theaters today. The film has been a shining star at this year's fall film festivals, and our film critic, Kenneth Turan, says all the fuss is justified.

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The Picture Show
4:15 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Bill Eppridge, Photographer Who Captured RFK's Death, Dies at 75

Rigid, semiconscious, his face an ashen mask, Kennedy lies in a pool of his own blood on the concrete floor, a bullet deep in his brain and another in his neck. Juan Romero, a busboy whose hand Kennedy had shaken before the shots, tried to comfort him.
Bill Eppridge Courtesy of Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 8:44 am

Bill Eppridge, a legendary photojournalist who spent most of his career working for Life magazine and Sports Illustrated, died Thursday in Danbury, Conn. He had been suffering from a blood infection brought on by a fall that injured his hand, according to the National Press Photographers Association. He was 75.

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Television
12:44 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

'Breaking Bad' Writers: 'This Is It; There's No More'

Bryan Cranston (left) starred as chemistry teacher turned meth dealer Walter White, and Aaron Paul played former student and drug-dealing co-conspirator Jesse Pinkman in AMC's Breaking Bad, which wrapped up its fifth and final season on Sunday.
Ben Leuner AMC

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 2:05 pm

Before you read any farther or click the audio above, we have two words for you: Spoiler Alert. Also, a warning that if you have never seen Breaking Bad, we may touch on some plot points that will be hard to understand without context.

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The Salt
11:22 am
Thu October 3, 2013

How's The Sausage Made? These Folks Really Want To Share The Knowledge

Brent Gentry of Underground Meats rotates a coppa. Underground Meats is behind a new project that aims to lower the barrier to entry for would-be artisanal meat producers by making it easier for them to craft food safety plans.
Emily Julka Courtesy of Underground Meats

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 12:45 pm

With the current bloom of artisanal small-batch producers across the country, you'd think that all you need to start up a new food business is a good idea and a lot of gumption. And for the most part, that's true. But when it comes to artisanal producers working with meat, you also need something else: a Hazards Analysis and Critical Control Points plan. Or, if you will, a HACCP.

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Remembrances
11:03 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Remembering Tom Clancy, 'Faulkner In A Flak Jacket'

Tom Clancy poses next to a tank in his Maryland backyard. Though he never served in the military, his books were renowned for their detail.
AP

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 2:23 pm

The Army rejected him because of his bad eyes — he was nearsighted — but Tom Clancy, who went into the family insurance business instead of the military, turned out to have the greatest vision of modern warfare of any writer of our time. His research into military history and technology led him to create a new form of thriller, and a hero for our time, a man named Jack Ryan whose talents as a spy and technowarrior put a name and a face to the people who battled Russians, Pakistanis, Irish nationalists and Islamists along a constantly shifting front line.

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NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Rick Najera: A Latino In Hollywood Is 'Almost White'

Omar 'Yogi' Torres Courtesy of Shabazz Communications, Inc.

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 9:32 am

Rick Najera doesn't remember his wife Susie dialing 9-1-1. She came home six hours after Najera had taken a fall that left him bleeding on the floor of his home. The Hollywood actor/writer/producer had pneumonia and ended up in an intensive care unit in a coma.

Rick Najera told NPR's Michel Martin that his near-death experience caused him to reflect.

"I really looked at my life and I said I wanted to chronicle it. I wanted to bring it down and talk about it in a very human, honest way," he says.

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The Protojournalist
10:41 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Things Are Getting Ugly

Ugly is everywhere. There are Ugly Dog pageants, Ugly Sweater sites and Ugly Sofa contests. Taking Ugly-Faced selfies is an online phenomenon. Could ugly be the new beautiful?

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Ask Me Another
8:48 am
Thu October 3, 2013

David Wain: Notes On Camp

David Wain joined Ask Me Another at Central Park's SummerStage.
Steve McFarland NPR

David Wain is part of the comedy troupes The State and Stella, and directed the films Wanderlust, Role Models and the forthcoming They Came Together. But he is perhaps best known for creating one of the quintessential summer movies, Wet Hot American Summer, an absurdist chronicle of last-day shenanigans at a Jewish camp in the 1980s.

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Ask Me Another
8:48 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Kurt Andersen: Literary Romantic

Kurt Andersen.
Steve McFarland NPR

Kurt Andersen has written for film, television and stage, was Time's architecture and design critic, co-founded Spy magazine, curated a Smithsonian exhibit, wrote four books (his third novel, True Believers, was published in the summer of 2012), and now hosts PRI's Studio 360, the Peabody Award-winning radio show on WNYC. In the words of Ask Me Another host Ophira Eisenberg, "How about declaring a major already?"

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Ask Me Another
8:48 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Ants Marching

No summer is complete without a picnic, just as no picnic is completed without a few little annoyances: sunburn, spilled wine or ants. Ants! (Shakes fist.) This game, led by house musician Jonathan Coulton, imagines some heightened picnic scenarios, all of which are clues to words that end with the letters "-ant."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Ask Me Another
8:48 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Songs Of The Summer

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

At this time, let's bring back our VIP, Nellie McKay, to the ASK ME ANOTHER stage.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And we also have two new contestants, Judy Wolf and Cassidy Brown.

(APPLAUSE)

CASSIDY BROWN: Hello.

EISENBERG: Hello, hi. Judy, Cassidy, what is a song that I might find on your soundtrack.

BROWN: I think I have to download it still, because...

EISENBERG: OK, Cassidy?

BROWN: ...But the (singing) hot town, summer in the city, the back of my neck getting dirty and gritty.

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Ask Me Another
8:48 am
Thu October 3, 2013

They're Not Booing

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

You're listening to ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR and WNYC. I'm Ophira Eisenberg. Coming up, we'll reminisce about the songs of summer, and we'll take a cinematic tour of New York City. Plus we'll put director David Wain and actor B.J. Novak up to another ASK ME ANOTHER challenge. But first, joining us onstage right now are Allison Kelsey and Sam Denehy.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Allison, you are joining us from Philadelphia.

ALLISON KELSEY: I am.

EISENBERG: And you used to work in Central Park.

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Ask Me Another
8:48 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Five By Five, With Will Shortz

Will Shortz joined Ask Me Another at Central Park's SummerStage.
Steve McFarland NPR

With New York Times crossword puzzle editor Will Shortz as our V.I.P. Puzzle Guru, we knew he'd come up with a doozy of a final round. In this game, recorded at Central Park's SummerStage, contestants are given two five-letter words, and asked to anagram one word to get a synonym of the second. And when the final two standing turn out to be Studio 360 host Kurt Andersen and Wet Hot American Summer filmmaker David Wain, the competition gets even more heated.

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Ask Me Another
8:48 am
Thu October 3, 2013

B.J. Novak: Life After 'The Office'

B.J. Novak joined Ask Me Another at Central Park's SummerStage.
Steve McFarland NPR

Fresh off the ninth and final season of NBC's The Office, B.J. Novak is keeping busy. He is known both for his portrayal of the bratty temp Ryan Howard, as well as writing some of the show's most beloved episodes, such as "Diversity Day" and "The Fire." In his post-Office life, however, he's working on a book of "Woody Allen-esque" short stories and will appear in Saving Mr. Banks, the forthcoming Walt Disney biopic about the making of the film Mary Poppins.

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Monkey See
8:40 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Fitz That Time Again: The Consolidated Rules Of 'Scandal'

Kerry Washington (Emmy nominee!) plays Olivia Pope on Scandal.
Danny Feld ABC

Scandal returns Thursday night on ABC after two seasons of delicious, ridiculous, addictive total nonsense that made it a pop-culture preoccupation. (OK, obsession. But hey, we can quit any time we want.)

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The Two-Way
6:05 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Book News: Tom Clancy Remembered As The Father Of A Genre

Author Tom Clancy, seen in 2004, was an insurance agent before publishing The Hunt For Red October in 1984.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Thu October 3, 2013

'The Rosie Project' Will Charm You With Science

Promo image
iStockphoto.com

He's a socially inept scientist who's tone deaf to irony. She's an edgy young woman whose fallback mode is sarcasm. Put them together, and hilarity ensues in Australian IT consultant Graeme Simsion's first novel, The Rosie Project. It's an utterly winning screwball comedy about a brilliant, emotionally challenged geneticist who's determined to find a suitable wife with the help of a carefully designed questionnaire, and the patently unsuitable woman who keeps distracting him from his search.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Thu October 3, 2013

'Darling' Makes Unfussy Peace With Religion And Sexuality

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 9:55 am

Richard Rodriguez begins his latest book, Darling, with an unfussy dedication to the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas, a Catholic women's group committed to helping the sick and destitute. This Baptism, if you will, is the first and surely the most straightforward indication within the book that Rodriguez intends to delve into his complex relationship with religion. The path that lies beyond that dedication is weird and wonderful, and readers will find that it's far from a direct route.

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Remembrances
4:51 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Tom Clancy Dies, Left 'Indelible Mark' On Thriller Genre

Tom Clancy, seen here in 2010, was an insurance agent before publishing The Hunt For Red October in 1984.
David Burnett

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 6:56 pm

Best-selling author Tom Clancy has died. He was 66 years old. Beginning with the publication of his 1984 megahit The Hunt for Red October, Clancy wrote a string of blockbuster thrillers inspired by his fascination with military hardware and history.

Clancy didn't mince words when he talked to would-be writers. "If your objective is to write a book, get a computer and write the damn book," he told members of the military at a 2004 writing workshop. "Yes, you can do this if you try hard enough. It's a lot easier than you realize it is."

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The Salt
3:45 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Fish Guidelines For Pregnant Women May Be Too Strict, Study Suggests

In a study of 4,000 pregnant women, fish accounted for only 7 percent of blood mercury levels.
JackF iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 4:22 pm

The health benefits of eating fish are pretty well-known. A lean source of protein, fish can be a rich source of healthful omega-3 fatty acids and has been shown to benefit heart, eye and brain health.

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The Salt
1:57 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Is It Time To Cool It On Kale Already?

Are we putting too much pressure on this little superfood that could?
Peet Sneekes Flickr

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 1:23 pm

Let's start by agreeing to this premise: Kale is very good for you.

And yes, we here at The Salt have been known to indulge in — nay, crave — kale chips and kale salads on a not infrequent basis.

Still, when we found out that Wednesday is National Kale Day — featuring a kale dance party (we kid you not) — we couldn't help but think: Come on, people, the kale love has officially Gone. Too. Far.

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Sports
11:57 am
Wed October 2, 2013

At 49, Jamie Moyer's Pitching Career Goes Into Extra Innings

Jamie Moyer, shown above pitching for the Colorado Rockies in May 2012, made his major league debut back in 1986. He says that after decades in the major leagues, he'd occasionally have to remind himself that "in baseball terms, I really was old, but in everyday life, I really wasn't."
Andy Lyons Getty Images

We don't often think of professional athletes improving with age, but Jamie Moyer was a better pitcher in his 40s than he was in his 20s. Moyer became the oldest pitcher to win a Major League Baseball game when, in April 2012, at the age of 49 years, 150 days, he pitched the Colorado Rockies to a 5-3 win over the San Diego Padres.

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The Protojournalist
11:12 am
Wed October 2, 2013

The 1,000-Year Calendar: Mark These Dates

In the futuristic books, movies, songs and video games that abound, there is an overabundance of speculation about the distant future.

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The Two-Way
10:12 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Tom Clancy, Master Of Military Techno-Thrillers, Dies

Author Tom Clancy in 2003.
Ralph Lauer MCT/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 12:45 pm

Tom Clancy, the best-selling writer of such "techno-thrillers" as The Hunt for Red October, Red Storm Rising and Patriot Games, has died.

He was 66.

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The Picture Show
9:52 am
Wed October 2, 2013

A Long-Standing Love Affair With Myanmar

Woman smoking cheroot, Mandalay
Courtesy of Geoffrey Hiller

Photographer Geoffrey Hiller made his first foray into Myanmar — also known as Burma — when he was traveling around Southeast Asia in 1987. At the time, he could only get a seven-day tourist visa, and the best method for changing currency was to arrive with two cartons of cigarettes and two bottles of Johnnie Walker, then trade them for cash outside the airport.

"I'll never forget flying in from Bangkok — there were no lights at all, and all you could see was the Shwedagon Pagoda," he says of his initial arrival.

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UIS Visual Arts Gallery
7:00 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Artist Explores Vachel Lindsay's 'Golden Springfield' With Installation

Vachel Lindsay is one of Springfield's most well known historical figures, considered the father of "singing poetry" - he was known as the Prairie Troubadour and was one of the most celebrated poets of his time. But a lesser known aspect of the writer is the utopian vision he had for the future - influenced by his own political brand of socialism. These ideas became a novel called 'The Golden Book of Springfield.' 

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