Arts

The Two-Way
10:53 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Collectible Art At Street Prices: Banksy Sells Pieces For $60

An image from a video posted by Banksy shows a man representing the artist staffing a sidewalk stall featuring signed works for $60. Banksy says he only made $420 Saturday, with one customer negotiating a 2-for-1 discount.
Banksy NY YouTube

New Yorkers who love a good bargain missed a golden opportunity Saturday, when the artist and provocateur Banksy, whose sly graffiti art adorns collectors' walls, opened a sidewalk kiosk in Central Park to sell his work for $60 apiece.

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Remembrances
3:39 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Pulitzer Prize Winner Oscar Hijuelos Dies At 62

Novelist Oscar Hijuelos was the first Latino writer to win the prize for fiction, for his second novel, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love. He died over the weekend at age 62. David Greene talks to author Gustavo Perez Firmat, who is a Columbia University professor and was a friend of Hijuelos.

Movie Interviews
5:12 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Alan Rickman On 'CBGB' And The Importance Of Listening

Alan Rickman tells NPR's Arun Rath he wasn't familiar with CBGB or the punk scene until he began working on the film.
Beau Giann XLrator Media

After several failed musical ventures and two bankruptcies, New Yorker Hilly Kristal decided to try something new. In 1973, he opened a bar in Lower Manhattan intended to showcase sounds not so indigenous to the urban landscape: country, bluegrass and blues. And so came the name for the dive bar CBGB.

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Sunday Puzzle
7:21 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Can You Pass This -TE ST-?

NPR

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 7:47 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is an insider's test. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the consecutive letters T-E-S-T. Specifically, the first word will end with -TE and the second word will start ST-. For example, given "sheer force," you would say "brute strength."

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Author Interviews
6:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Turow Explores Mystical Connections In 'Identical'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 7:47 am

Scott Turow says some recent research in a case with DNA evidence inspired the plot of his new thriller, Identical. He tells host Rachel Martin about his interest in twins.

The Salt
6:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

With Each Sip Of Whisky, You're Taking A Gulp Of Atmosphere

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 3:48 pm

You know the saying about drinking early in the day: "It's 5 o'clock somewhere in the world."

Well, it turns out that the "somewhere" actually can make a difference when it comes to drinking.

Scientists at Oxford University have found that whisky has a different taste depending on where it's sipped.

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You Must Read This
6:03 am
Sun October 13, 2013

'Mezzanine' Takes The Trappings Of Everyday Life To The Next Level

iStockphoto.com

Okay, I admit it. I was going to tell you to read Proust. The thing is, a whole industry already exists around urging you to read Proust, and as well-meaning as those literary evangelists might be, they only end up making you feel unworthy, illiterate and/or lazy.

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The Salt
4:38 am
Sun October 13, 2013

(Cabbage) Heads Will Roll: How To Make A Food Network 'From Scratch'

According to journalist Allen Salkin, Emeril Lagasse initially opposed bringing Rachael Ray, pictured here in 2007, onto the Food Network – and, at first, Ray agreed with him. "You have this all wrong," she told executives, "I'm beer in a bottle; you guys are champagne."
Scott Gries Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 7:47 am

Mario Batali, Guy Fieri and Rachael Ray are just a few of the stars the Food Network helped create. But what the network gave, it could also take away.

In From Scratch, author Allen Salkin takes an unsparing look at the network's progression from struggling cable startup to global powerhouse, and the people — Emeril Lagasse, Paula Deen — who rose and fell along the way.

Salkin tells NPR's Rachel Martin that while the network was intended for cooks, it wasn't run by them.

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Pop Culture
4:07 pm
Sat October 12, 2013

The New And The Next: Six-Second Comedy And A Spin On News

Courtesy of Elise Andrew

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 1:27 pm

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Movie Interviews
3:29 pm
Sat October 12, 2013

'God Loves Uganda': How Religion Fueled An Anti-Gay Movement

Christopher Senyonjo says he was excommunicated from the Anglican church in the early 2000s, but continues his ministry and activism.
Crispin Buxton

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 8:40 pm

Four years ago, a bill was introduced in Uganda's parliament that would criminalize same-sex relations. The Anti-Homosexuality Bill has not yet become law, but it has drawn international attention to the animosity against gays in the African nation.

In the documentary God Loves Uganda, director Roger Ross Williams traces the bill's origins to the American evangelical missions in Uganda.

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Author Interviews
2:34 pm
Sat October 12, 2013

The Surprising Story Of 'Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 1:53 pm

Thomas Jefferson had a vast personal library reflecting his enormous curiosity about the world. Among his volumes: a Quran purchased in 1765 that informed his ideas about plurality and religious freedom in the founding of America.

In her book Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an: Islam and the Founders, author Denise Spellberg draws parallels between the beliefs of the founding father and religious tolerance in the United States today.

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Author Interviews
6:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

From Divided States, A 'United' Nation — Thanks To These Men

The Men Who United the States, by Simon Winchester

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 9:27 am

The United States is not just a phrase. The country stretches across six time zones, from the Atlantic well into the Pacific. The British settled some regions; the Dutch, Spanish and French settled some others. And we once fought a bloody Civil War, North against South, over the issue of slavery.

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Arts & Life
6:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

A Traditional Wedding Brings The Polish Highlands To Chicago

Dressed in traditional Polish Highlander garb, guests pile into carriages that will bring them to the church for the official wedding ceremony.
Linda Paul for NPR

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 7:05 am

Last weekend, a quiet block on the northwest side of Chicago appeared to be taken over by villagers from the mountains of southern Poland. That's because a Polish Highlander wedding was getting underway. But even before the couple arrived, there was a lot of pomp, circumstance — and moving of cars.

Any time now the bridal party will be arriving and Andy Zieba — father of the bride — is ringing doorbells, asking neighbors if they can please move their cars.

"Excuse me, ma'am? You don't know who's the Honda belong to?" he asks.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Sat October 12, 2013

'Identical' Stumbles Outside The Courtroom

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:13 pm

The best way I can fairly review this book is to tell you seven things that it is not.

It is not a legal thriller. That would require the novel to be thrilling, at the very least, to compel you to turn the page. In my case, I read the book on a Kindle, and it often compelled me to turn my e-reader off.

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The Salt
5:07 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Women, The 'First Brewers,' Lean Into Craft Beer-Making

Meg Gill is the president and co-founder of Golden Road Brewing in Los Angeles. Her brewery is favored to win awards at the Great American Beer Festival.
Melissa Kuypers NPR

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 9:09 am

Thousands of beer aficionados are in Denver this weekend for the Great American Beer Festival. Some 600 breweries from around the country are represented at the marquee event for the craft-brewing industry.

And while this annual competition has long been male-dominated, that's starting to change.

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The Salt
2:54 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Feminist Hulk Smash Shutdown, Rescue Women On Food Aid!

Courtesy Jessica Lawson

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:09 pm

The government shutdown is frustrating enough for furloughed workers, but for families dependent on federal food assistance, it's infuriating.

Enter the Feminist Hulk.

The Twitter monster is smashing the shutdown's threats to the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Food and Nutrition program, which provides food aid to pregnant women and mothers of young children deemed to be at risk of malnutrition. And she's urging her nearly 74,000 followers to help.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Not My Job: A Quiz About Lawyers For Breaking Bad's Bob Odenkirk

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 10:42 am

If you're a comedy person, you know Bob Odenkirk from the cult classic sketch series Mr. Show. If you're a drama person, or a meth person, you know him as the shyster lawyer Saul Goodman on Breaking Bad. Now he has a new show on the IFC called The Birthday Boys.

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Lincoln Memorial Garden
4:57 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Indian Summer Festival & Updates From Lincoln Memorial Garden

Joel Horwedel - Executive Director of LMG

Lincoln Memorial Garden & Nature Center may well be Springfield's most celebrated destination for nature-enthusiasts. With over 100 acres of wilderness and trails, it provides a serene landscape along Lake Springfield for residents and tourists to soak in some sun and fresh air, free of charge. 

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Movie Interviews
4:56 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'The Square' Tightens Lens On Egypt's Revolution

Ahmed Hassan is the leader of the group of young Egyptian revolutionaries at the center of The Square.
Noujaim Films

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 9:56 pm

The new documentary The Square — set in Cairo's Tahrir Square — is a gripping, visceral portrait of the 2011 Egyptian revolution and its tumultuous aftermath.

The film puts the audience directly in the middle of the protests, and follows the lives of several young revolutionaries over the two and half years since. It charts their journey from the early euphoria of victory to the depths of despair as those victories unravel amid violent clashes and profound political confrontations among the secular revolutionaries, the Muslim Brotherhood and the military.

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Code Switch
3:52 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Fetch Clay, Make Man': Ali, Fetchit And The 'Anchor Punch'

In 1965, Muhammad Ali and Lincoln Perry (Stepin Fetchit) teamed up in pursuit of a legendary boxing technique: the anchor punch.
Courtesy of New York Theatre Workshop

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:38 pm

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Muhammad Ali's first title defense, a first-round TKO of Sonny Liston in 1965, propelled Ali to the status of icon. In Ali's training camp before the fight was an icon from an earlier era: Lincoln Perry. He was the first African-American movie star, who went by the stage name Stepin Fetchi. The relationship between the two men is the subject of an off-Broadway play called Fetch Clay, Make Man.

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Books
3:31 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Coming Clean' About Growing Up In A Hoarding Household

Kimberly Rae Miller grew up among piles of junk. Doors wouldn't close, stacks of paper turned to sludge, and the pool was filled with brown muck. Her father was a hoarder — in the most extreme kind of way. Host Michel Martin talks to Miller about how she coped, which is detailed in her memoir, Coming Clean. This segment initially aired July 29, 2013 on Tell Me More.

Politics
3:31 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

David Dinkins: Leading New York Is The 'Greatest Job There Is'

David Dinkins served as New York City's first African-American mayor. But his rise through the political ranks came with hard-learned lessons. Host Michel Martin speaks with former Mayor Dinkins about his book, A Mayor's Life: Governing New York's Gorgeous Mosaic. This segment initially aired September 2, 2013 on Tell Me More.

The Salt
3:06 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

McDonald's President Was Caught Off Guard By Low-Wage, Single Mom

McDonald's USA President Jeff Stratton responds to an employee who burst into an event.
YouTube screengrab

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 11:11 am

A video of a McDonald's worker confronting the president of the fast-food behemoth has gone viral this week, with the help of a fast-food workers' campaign aimed at raising hourly wages to $15.

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The Salt
2:04 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

What's In That Chicken Nugget? Maybe You Don't Want To Know

Chicken Nuggets, from artist Banksy's 2008 installation "The Village Pet Store and Charcoal Grill" in New York City.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:19 am

Chicken nuggets: Call 'em tasty, call 'em crunchy, call 'em quick and convenient. But maybe you shouldn't call them "chicken."

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Monkey See
1:46 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Glee' Says Goodbye

Glee remembered Cory Monteith in Thursday night's episode, "The Quarterback."
Adam Rose Fox

When Cory Monteith died in July, the fact that it put Glee in a terrible position was certainly the least of the rotten outcomes.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Brave Genius': A Tale of Two Nobelists

In Brave Genius: A Scientist, a Philosopher, and Their Daring Adventures from the French Resistance to the Nobel Prize, Sean B. Carroll tells the story of biologist Jacques Monod and philosopher Albert Camus--two men who made significant contributions to their respective fields, and who shared an enduring friendship.

Faith Matters
12:52 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Elizabeth Smart: My Faith And 'My Story'

Elizabeth Smart says she never lost faith during her nine-month captivity.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 3:56 pm

Elizabeth Smart was just 14 years old when she was kidnapped at knifepoint from her Salt Lake City home in 2002. She was held captive for nine months and forced to act as Brian David Mitchell's second wife. He raped her nearly every day and told her that the ordeal was ordained by God.

Smart says there were moments when she felt there was no one to turn to — except God. She writes about how her Mormon faith played a key part in her survival in her new memoir, My Story.

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Movie Reviews
12:52 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

A Pirate Saga More Sobering Than Swashbuckling

Barkhad Abdi (middle) plays Muse, the leader of a band of Somali pirates who take over a freighter in Captain Phillips.
Hopper Stone Columbia Pictures

Most kidnapping melodramas have final scenes — after their climaxes — that are, effectively, throwaways. There are sighs of relief, tearful reunions with families, cameras that dolly back on domestic tableaux to suggest the world has at last been righted.

I think it's telling that in Captain Phillips the most overwhelming scene is after the resolution, in the infirmary of a ship. So much terror and moral confusion has gone down — so much pain — that the cumulative tension can't be resolved by violence. The movie's grip remains strong even when it cuts to black.

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Donnie's
12:47 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Allie Kral Brings Her Fiddle To Springfield

Allie Kral

Allie Kral was the most visible member of the group Cornmeal - a popular blue-grass jam band from Chicago, but she recently left the group to pursue other interests. Trained as a classical violinist, Kral has a unique style and she's widely regarded as one of the best fiddle players in the nation. She plays on Saturday in Springfield at Donnie's Homespun with the band Hot Buttered Rum.

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Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
11:57 am
Fri October 11, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of October 10, 2013

A secret San Francisco book club meets in Robin Sloan's Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore, at No. 8.

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