Arts

The Salt
5:35 am
Sun November 17, 2013

'Anything That Moves' Explores America's Extreme Food Culture

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 3:20 pm

Author Dana Goodyear has spent a lot of time dining with foodies who champion bugs as a meal. And horses. And brains. Whales. Leaves. Weeds. Ash. Hay. Even plain dirt.

Goodyear, a staff writer for The New Yorker, set out to document the outer bounds of the extreme food culture that has taken hold among American foodies. Their quest for ever more exotic, challenging ingredients, she says, is raising fundamental questions about the nature of food itself and the assumptions that underlie what we view as acceptable to eat.

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NPR Story
5:35 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Ricky Martin Writes A 'Dreamer' For Children

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 10:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

He is a Grammy Award winner, an international music superstar, New York Times best-selling author. And now Ricky Martin has yet another accomplishment to add to his already impressive resume: children's author. Ricky Martin has just released his first children's book. It is called "Santiago the Dreamer: Land Among the Stars." Martin joins us from New York City. Thanks so much for being with us.

RICKY MARTIN: Thank you so much for having me. How are you, Rachel?

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My Guilty Pleasure
4:22 am
Sun November 17, 2013

If Being A Teen Wasn't Awkward Enough: A Date With 'Your Mom'

iStockphoto

I read my guilty pleasure junior year of high school; a time when for many young men guilty pleasure means something else. I heard about a book of essays by Ian Frazier that was supposedly very funny. So I asked my Mom for a ride to the mall.

Back then there was no Amazon. Well, there was, but it was in South America. Fortunately, asking Mom if she'd like to go to the mall was sort of like asking Chuck Schumer if he'd mind going on television. Three minutes later, we were in the car. Mom asked the name of the book I was getting.

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Photography
1:55 am
Sun November 17, 2013

In The Streets Of Iran, A Fashion Shoot Bursting With Color

A photo that was featured in FSHN Magazine's 2013 couture issue.
Afra Pourdad

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 10:24 am

Iran is a notoriously closed society, so this was an unusual milestone: It was recently the setting for a high-fashion magazine shoot, published in California-based magazine FSHN.

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Television
4:41 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

Republican-Filled 'Alpha House' Aims For Bipartisan Laughs

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Fans of "Doonesbury" have been doing without the Pulitzer Prize-winning comic strip since the summer. The strip has been on vacation. But its creator, Garry Trudeau, has not exactly been chilling at the beach. Trudeau spent the last several months in a New York film studio making a sitcom called "Alpha House." The show is being launched online on Amazon. It chronicles the misadventures of four fictional Republican senators who share a Washington, D.C., townhouse. Jon Kalish visited the set and has this story.

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Movie Interviews
4:21 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

At 13, 'Book Thief' Star Picks The Screen Over The Balance Beam

Sophie Nelisse says years of training as a gymnast taught her to focus in ways that helped her acting on the set of The Book Thief.
Jules Heath Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 7:38 pm

At 13, Sophie Nelisse is already making big career decisions. She started training to be a gymnast at the age of 3 and has long had dreams to represent Canada in the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

"If you want to train at a national, international level, you have about [one] week of break per year," Nelisse tells host Arun Rath. "So I was training about six hours per day."

She put that part of her life aside when she was given another opportunity of a lifetime: to play the lead in the film The Book Thief.

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Author Interviews
7:03 am
Sat November 16, 2013

Pro Wrestling Mythology Plays Out In 'Squared Circle'

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 10:22 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF WRESTLING EVENT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Welcome to the grandeur, the magnificence, the beauty and the brilliance of the greatest love event in all of entertainment. Welcome to WrestleMania.

DON GONYEA, HOST:

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Parallels
7:03 am
Sat November 16, 2013

Animated Film On The 'Kamikaze Plane' Hits A Nerve In Asia

The latest film from celebrated Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki, The Wind Rises, centers on the engineer who designed the plane used in the kamikaze attacks during World War II.
Studio Ghibli Walt Disney

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 10:22 am

Oscar-winning Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki created beloved films such as Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away. But his latest film is drawing unusually sharp criticism.

The Wind Rises is no ordinary tale: It tells the story of Jiro Horikoshi, the Japanese engineer who designed the Mitsubishi Zero, the fighter plane (in)famously used in kamikaze attacks in World War II.

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Book Reviews
4:30 am
Sat November 16, 2013

The Fun In 'Black-Haired Girl' Isn't The Plot — It's The People

iStockphoto.com

Robert Stone won the National Book Award in 1975, for his second novel, Dog Soldiers. Since then, he's twice been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and nominated for or the recipient of a florist's display of other honors. Recently, when I asked some writers and English professors at a party to name the best novel ever written about Hollywood, Stone's Children of Light was the top choice.

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Movie Interviews
4:29 am
Sat November 16, 2013

On The Timeless Appeal Of 'Calvin & Hobbes'

Joel Allen Schroeder dove into the world of Calvin & Hobbes for Dear Mr. Watterson, an admiring documentary about the strip.
Gravitas Ventures/Submarine Deluxe

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 5:39 pm

Bill Watterson brought an end to Calvin & Hobbes in 1995, after just 10 years of writing and drawing the comic strip. But to his many devoted fans, that shockheaded boy and his tiger are as important today as they were when they first appeared in daily papers all around the country.

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NPR Story
1:03 am
Sat November 16, 2013

The Soulful, Swinging Sounds Of Stax: A Look Back

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 10:22 am

Memphis' Stax Records was an international sensation, putting out hits like Sam and Dave's "Hold On, I'm Coming," "Green Onions" by Booker T. and the MGs and Otis Redding's "Try a Little Tenderness." But behind the music, Stax's story features racial harmony in a city with a troubled history. There are tragedies, lost opportunities and legal disputes, but also some of the most soulful music you'll ever hear.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:03 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Astronaut Chris Hadfield Plays Not My Job

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 5:54 pm

The International Space Station is a pretty great backdrop for a music video, and Commander Chris Hadfield didn't waste the opportunity as he was orbiting the Earth (at 17,500 miles an hour) back in the spring of 2012. The Canadian astronaut performed his own rendition of David Bowie's "Space Oddity" — and also tweeted and blogged from orbit, making him the de facto ambassador from Outer Space.

Since Hadfield sang about Major Tom in space, we've invited him to answer three questions about some lesser-known Toms.

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Book Reviews
5:43 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

In A Storm's Wake, Two Books Help Make Sense Of What Remains

Typhoon Haiyan survivors walk through the ruins of their neighborhood on the outskirts of Tacloban, central Philippines, on Wednesday.
David Guttenfelder AP

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 7:07 pm

Late last week, Typhoon Haiyan tore through the Philippines, leaving rubble for wake and cities in shambles. It was among the strongest storms ever recorded. In the days that have followed, the death toll exacted by the storm has reached breathtaking levels — more than 3,500 fatalities by last count — and the economic devastation must be measured in the billions.

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Movie Interviews
3:46 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Steve Coogan, Tacking Toward The Funny Side Of Serious

Steve Coogan acts alongside Judi Dench in Philomena, the story of a woman searching for her son and the cynical journalist helping her find him.
Alex Bailey The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 7:07 pm

Philomena is the true story of a retired Irish nurse (Judi Dench) whose child was put up for adoption — against her will, by the nuns at the convent where she gave birth — when she was a teenager, and unwed. Fifty years later, a journalist grudgingly joins in her search for that son. The British comedian Steve Coogan, who also produced the project and co-wrote the screenplay, plays the reporter.

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Television
3:34 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Amazon Opens An Entertainment Door With 'Alpha House'

Mark Consuelos (from left), John Goodman, Clark Johnson and Matt Malloy star as four Republican senators sharing a house in Washington in Alpha House, Amazon's first original series.
Amazon Studios

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 7:07 pm

There are about a dozen reasons I really wanted to love Alpha House, an original comedy series about four U.S. senators sharing a home on Capitol Hill. It premieres on Amazon — yes, Amazon — on Friday.

The biggest reason: often-underrated star John Goodman, playing a politician up for re-election who knows exactly what voters value in a legislator:

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Movie Reviews
1:57 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Across 'Nebraska,' On A Journey That Goes Beyond The Trip

David (Will Forte, left) and his father, Woody (Bruce Dern, center), take time out of their quixotic journey to stop in Woody's small Nebraska hometown — where Woody's old business partner, Ed (Stacy Keach), is still nursing a grudge.
Merie W. Wallace Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 4:47 pm

Last month, I saw the trailer for Alexander Payne's Nebraska, and only the fact that it was a Payne film made me want to see it.

The premise seemed a dead end: Bruce Dern plays an elderly man named Woody Grant living in Billings, Mont., who gets a letter saying he's won $1 million. All he needs to do is call a number and maybe buy a magazine subscription.

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NPR Bestseller List
12:19 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of November 14, 2013

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

Author Interviews
12:16 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Early Balloonists Took Science 'Up, Up and Away'

In Falling Upwards, writer Richard Holmes tells the story of early balloon flight--and of the nervy scientists who risked life and limb to take their experiments into the air. Among their discoveries? Insect migration and the stratosphere. Falling Upwards chronicles the balloonists who took science into the stratosphere.

Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri November 15, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of November 14, 2013

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 12:51 pm

The 1853 memoir of free man turned captive Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave, appears at No. 10.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri November 15, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of November 14, 2013

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 12:48 pm

The House Girl, appearing at No. 15, is Tara Conklin's tale of two women, two eras, art and slavery.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri November 15, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of November 14, 2013

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 12:54 pm

Doris Kearns Goodwin details Teddy Roosevelt and Taft's friendship in The Bully Pulpit, debuting at No. 4.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri November 15, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of November 14, 2013

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 12:42 pm

Debuting at No. 2, Amy Tan's The Valley of Amazement looks into the lives of courtesans in Shanghai.

13.7: Cosmos And Culture
10:34 am
Fri November 15, 2013

How To Love A Fake

Museum director Alex Rueger (L) and Dutch artist Jeroen Krabbe stand in front of Vincent van Gogh's long-lost Sunset at Montmajour at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. The 1888 landscape painting from the height of the Dutch master's career had been abandoned for years in a Norwegian attic on the belief that it was a forgery.
Lex van Lieshout AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 4:36 pm

Art has been in the news a lot lately.

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Movie Reviews
10:32 am
Fri November 15, 2013

From A Superfan, A Love Letter To 'Calvin & Hobbes'

The film respects Watterson's famous desire for privacy — he's not interviewed — but it does take viewers to the library where the original Calvin artwork is housed.
Gravitas Ventures/Submarine Deluxe

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 1:27 pm

New Year's Eve 1995 fell on a Sunday, and given that it was before we all started reading our news on LCD screens, chances are pretty good you had a Sunday paper delivered. And that day's paper had something special wrapped up inside.

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Bedrock
9:25 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Cash Box Kings Bring Blues To Springfield

The Cash Box Kings bring their post WWII blues to the Hoogland Saturday night for the next Bedrock 66 Live!  CLICK HERE for tickets or call 217-523-2787.

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Monkey See
8:22 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Twitter And Subtitled Television

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

On this week's show, we are lucky enough to be visited in the absence of our buddy Glen by the lovely Audie Cornish, who, in her spare time, is one of the hosts of a little afternoon show called All Things Considered. Audie took some time away from the Actual Hard News beat to chat with us about a few things and to gracefully accept a surprising comparison to Ron Burgundy. (It's a long story.)

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TED Radio Hour
8:20 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Are We Happier When We Have More Options?

Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 2:06 pm

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Misconceptions.

About Barry Schwartz's TEDTalk

Psychologist Barry Schwartz takes aim at a central tenet of western societies: freedom of choice. In Schwartz's estimation, choice has made us not freer but more paralyzed, not happier but more dissatisfied.

About Barry Schwartz

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TED Radio Hour
8:20 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Where Does General Tso Chicken Actually Come From?

Andrew Heavens TED

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 8:38 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Misconceptions.

About Jennifer 8. Lee's Talk

Journalist Jennifer 8. Lee talks about her hunt for the origins of familiar Chinese-American dishes — exploring the hidden spots where these two cultures have combined to form a new cuisine.

About Jennifer 8. Lee

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TED Radio Hour
8:20 am
Fri November 15, 2013

What Are The Lives of Chinese Factory Workers Really Like?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 2:06 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Misconceptions.

About Leslie T. Chang's TEDTalk

Behind all our material goods, from iPhones to sneakers, is a narrative of exploited Chinese workers with bleak lives. Reporter Leslie T. Chang says that's a disrespectful narrative. She sought out workers in a Chinese megacity and tells their stories.

About Leslie T. Chang

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TED Radio Hour
8:20 am
Fri November 15, 2013

What's The Real Story Of David And Goliath?

Malcolm Gladwell explains why knowing the whole story about David and Goliath changes its meaning.
Dian Lofton Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Wed January 15, 2014 10:18 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Misconceptions.

About Malcolm Gladwell's TEDTalk

The story of David and Goliath has transcended its biblical origins to become a common shorthand for unlikely victory. But, asks author Malcolm Gladwell, is that really what the David and Goliath story is about?

About Malcolm Gladwell

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