Arts

NPR Story
4:01 am
Thu September 4, 2014

Legal Troubles Dog Famed Spanish Architect Santiago Calatrava

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 6:43 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

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Television
2:32 am
Thu September 4, 2014

CBS's Thursday Night Football: An Ambitious Alliance With A Lot At Stake

Actor Don Cheadle will narrate the opening for each broadcast of Thursday Night Football.
Neil Jacobs CBS

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 12:49 pm

How much football is too much for TV?

That's the question CBS and the NFL may face Sept. 11, when the curtain rises on their ambitious experiment to build a new broadcast television home for pro football on Thursdays.

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The Seams
2:30 am
Thu September 4, 2014

For 'Women In Clothes,' It's Not What You Wear, It's Why You Wear It

Artist Miranda July contributed a series of photos in which strangers try on one another's favorite outfits.
Michael Schmelling Courtesy of Blue Rider Press

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 4:36 pm

It can be hard to talk about clothes in an intelligent way. Fashion critic Kennedy Fraser once wrote in The New Yorker that the act of donning a garment can seem almost furtive or trivial, something beneath debate or intellectual content. The editors of Women in Clothes would agree that it's a challenge. The book collects essays, conversations, pictures and testimonials from more than 600 women talking about how clothes shape or reflect them as human beings.

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Goats and Soda
3:40 pm
Wed September 3, 2014

A $1 Microscope Folds From Paper With A Drop Of Glue

All folded up and ready to magnify: The Foldscope weighs less than two nickels, is small enough to fit in your back pocket and offers more than 2,000-fold magnification.
TED/YouTube

Originally published on Fri September 5, 2014 11:13 am

We have pocket watches, pocket cameras and now — with smartphones — pocket computers.

So why shouldn't doctors and scientists around the world have pocket microscopes?

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Book Reviews
1:27 pm
Wed September 3, 2014

'10:04': A Strange, Spectacular Novel Connecting Several Plotlines

I admired Ben Lerner's last novel a lot; in fact, I ended my review of Leaving the Atocha Station by saying that "reading it was unlike any other novel-reading experience I've had for a long time." I could say the very same thing about Lerner's brilliant new novel, 10:04, which leads me to wonder: Just how many singular reading experiences can one novelist serve up? And if every one of Lerner's novels is singular, doesn't that make them, in a way, repetitive?

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UIS Visual Arts Gallery
9:39 am
Wed September 3, 2014

UIS Gallery Full Of 'Filler'

Part of Jeff Robinson's exhibit 'Filler' at the UIS Visual Arts Gallery
Credit uis.edu

Jeff Robinson spent his summer filling the UIS Visual Arts Gallery with stuff. His exhibition is called "Filler." Robinson heads the gallery, and his exhibit is site specific, it's an installation that will only exist in the gallery on a temporary basis. He recently joined us to talk about the work and what it means to him....

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The Two-Way
6:19 am
Wed September 3, 2014

Book News: Floating Library To Open On New York's Hudson River

The Floating Library is taking place aboard the Lilac Museum Steamship at Pier 25 on the Hudson River in New York City from Sept. 6 to Oct. 3.
Courtesy of Beatrice Glow

Originally published on Wed September 3, 2014 10:18 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:32 am
Wed September 3, 2014

Brilliant, Unsparing 'Prelude' Will Leave A Bruise

Originally published on Sat September 27, 2014 5:29 pm

The difficulty in reviewing excellent poetry is to keep from responding in kind. When I've thoroughly enjoyed a collection, it isn't enough to praise the rhythm, the intensity, the clarity of the work I've just read; I find myself writing about how the book is "seamed in smoke" or observing "the supple twisting of its narrative spine." But I don't want to do that here — Saeed Jones' Prelude to Bruise is so visceral and affecting, I can't risk burying it in my own figurative language.

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All Tech Considered
4:03 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

In Tom Hanks' iPad App, Typewriters Make Triumphant Return (Ding!)

Actor and typewriter aficionado Tom Hanks says typing on a typewriter "is only a softer version of chiseling words into stone."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed September 3, 2014 4:06 pm

Tom Hanks' love affair with typewriters began in the 1970s, with his first proper typewriter — a Hermes 2000. Typewriters are "beautiful works of art," he tells NPR's Audie Cornish. "And I've ended up collecting them from every ridiculous source possible."

Hanks admits he started his collection when he had a "little excess cash" but, he points out, it's "better to spend it on $50 typewriters than some of the other things you can blow show-business money on."

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Arts
2:48 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Decatur's Kirkland - From Beethoven To The Beatles

Kirkland Fine Arts Center
Credit millikin.edu/kirkland

The Kirkland Fine Arts Center in Decatur's season kicks off this weekend with a Beatles tribute band. Theres quite a variety of shows, we recently spoke with Jan Traughber who heads Kirkland about the season: 

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Education
1:49 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

A Lesson In How Teachers Became 'Resented And Idealized'

Dana Goldstein has reported on education for several years, including in The Atlantic and The Daily Beast.
Michael Lionstar Courtesy of Doubleday

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 3:16 pm

As students return to school, the national dialogue on controversies surrounding teacher tenure, salaries, the core curriculum, testing and teacher competence will get more fervent.

In her new book, The Teacher Wars, Dana Goldstein writes about how teaching became "the most controversial profession in America," and how teachers have become both "resented and idealized."

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The Salt
10:48 am
Tue September 2, 2014

There's Much More To Apples Than Meets The Eye

Surprise! This is what it looks like when you cut into a Redfield apple.
Clare Borboza Bloomsbury

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 6:11 pm

One of my favorite Far Side cartoons shows four triumphant cavemen with a giant carrot hoisted onto their shoulders, with the caption, "Early vegetarians returning from the kill."

That's kind of what it looks like every autumn weekend when my better half, Dan, comes home from the farmers market with a half-bushel of apples balanced on his shoulder.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Book News: New Haruki Murakami Book Coming Out In December

Publicity-shy Japanese author Haruki Murakami arrives to give a public lecture in Kyoto in May 2013.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 9:58 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Accepting The Strange Brilliance Of 'Acceptance'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 12:04 pm

We have to backtrack a little here, right at the start.

Acceptance, book three in Jeff VanderMeer's Southern Reach trilogy, is hitting the shelves soon, and I want very badly to talk about it. But before I can do that, I have to talk about the first two books. To set the scene, as it were. To make any of this make any kind of sense, because Southern Reach is not the kind of series where you can just drop in at book two or three and have any idea what's happening. VanderMeer doesn't coddle dilettantes. He rewards the dedicated.

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Photography
5:49 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Depression-Era Photos Make A Mark In American Photography

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 11:19 am

A Yale University project has organized and mapped photographs taken for the Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information from 1935 to 1946. Now there's an online tool to explore them.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Business
4:13 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Summer Box Office Receipts Are The Worst In 8 Years

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 6:24 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
3:20 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Guns Boom In 2014 Campaign Ads

Image from Montana congressional hopeful Matt Rosendale's campaign ad, in which he shoots what he calls a government drone out of the sky.
YouTube

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 9:53 am

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Men In America
3:20 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Doing The Hard Work Of Becoming A 'Real Man'

cover detail

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 7:08 pm

Here is something I wish I'd been taught when I was still a limp-wristed little boy: Any man who says that the performance of red-blooded masculinity comes naturally and is easy to pull off is either lying to you, or worse, himself. Being a man, or, constructing manhood is damn hard work.

Some of us just give up and eventually settle into an easier, more breathable version of ourselves. Others resort to all sorts of desperate shows of sexism, violence and general havoc in an attempt to convince ourselves and our culture that we are up to measure.

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The Two-Way
9:42 am
Mon September 1, 2014

For Anniversary, A New Chapter Of 'Charlie And The Chocolate Factory'

The first edition of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and the original hero Golden Egg from the film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory on display at Profiles In History in Calabasas, northwest of downtown Los Angeles, on July 19, 2012.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

The fan who suddenly got everything he wanted, the writer Roald Dahl never said in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, lived happily ever after. Fans of the beloved children's classic may not get everything they want, but they are getting a previously unpublished chapter from the book that turns 50 this month.

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Movies
8:26 am
Mon September 1, 2014

After A Ho-Hum Summer, Hollywood Ramps Up For Fall

Michael Keaton stars as a washed-up film star trying to make a stage comeback in Alejandro Inarritu's Birdman.
Alison Rosa

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 1:59 pm

Note: There are 26 films in the on-air version of this story — but here are three favorites.

Hollywood hauled out Apes, Transformers, and X-Men and still had a humdrum summer at the box office. For the first time in years, no summer blockbuster has managed to crack the $300 million barrier at the North American box office. In fact, until Guardians of the Galaxy came along, the film industry was looking at its lowest attendance figures in more than a decade.

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Book News & Features
6:03 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Author Charles Cumming Ponders The Seductions — And The Sins — Of Spying

Charles Cumming's latest book is A Colder War.
Jonathan Ring

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 11:50 am

If you were making a movie about the world of British espionage, you'd want to cast someone like Charles Cumming as your undercover agent. He's tall and handsome and self-assured and utterly charming in that self-deprecating British way. You can imagine him effortlessly gliding through the small talk of embassy parties or sweeping a gullible female officer off her feet — in service of queen and country, of course. In other words, it's easy to be seduced by him.

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Arts & Life
4:29 am
Mon September 1, 2014

MK Asante's Poem 'In Summer' Honors Paul Laurence Dunbar

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 6:55 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All this summer on MORNING EDITION, we've been asking poets to read work that evokes this season.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:58 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Deborah Rutter Becomes Kennedy Center's First Female President

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 6:55 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Crime In The City
2:16 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Ghanaian Mystery Writer Says 'It's Easy To Get Murdered In Accra'

Kwei Quartey sets one of the crime scenes in his second D.I. Dawson book in Agbogbloshie, an Accra slum.
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton NPR

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 8:41 am

White egrets swoop down on the Agbogbloshie Canal and stoop to pick at mounds of filth and trash in search of food. The clogged and stinky waterway dominates Agbogbloshie, the main shantytown in Accra, Ghana's capital city. You wonder how the birds manage to maintain white feathers as they wade in the putrid, muddy water.

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Author Interviews
5:01 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

'A Thousand Mirrors' Shows Two Views Of One Long, Brutal War

Lakruwan Wanniarachchi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 6:19 pm

It's hard to comprehend the toll Sri Lanka's civil war took on the South Asian country. The United Nations estimates that between 80,000 and 100,000 people lost their lives in the conflict — all on an island just slightly larger than West Virginia.

Ethnic tensions between two main ethnic groups in Sri Lanka — the majority Sinhalese and minority Tamils — simmered through the '60s and '70s. The civil war officially began in 1983 and continued until 2009.

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My Big Break
4:40 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

Fast-Talking 21-Year-Old Makes A Winning Bid For Auctioneer Glory

Blaine Lotz of Edna, Kan., is this year's winner of the prestigious World Livestock Auctioneer Championship, hosted by the Livestock Marketing Association.
Morgan Leigh Meisenheimer Livestock Marketing Association

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 6:17 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

When Blaine Lotz fires off prices from the auction block, the first thing you might notice is the lightning-fast speed of his words. But Lotz, wearing a suit and black cowboy hat as he rattles off numbers to a crowd of cattle-buyers, says there's much more to the art of auctioneering than speed.

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Movies
4:40 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

Bostonians: Success Of Whitey Bulger Movie Hangs On The Accent

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 5:45 pm

Boston has become the set for a new film about mobster Whitey Bulger. Locals believe getting the Boston accent right will make or break the movie.

(This piece originally aired on Morning Edition on Wed., Aug. 27)

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Television
4:40 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

X Prize Competition Could Make 'Tricorder' A Reality

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 6:17 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Code Switch
11:00 am
Sun August 31, 2014

Native American Artists Reclaim Images That Represent Them

Jason Lujan "re-contextualizes" the word 'Apache' in his art.
Jason Lujan

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 3:59 pm

There's been a lot of discussion about the name of a certain Washington football team — with lawsuits arguing that it is disparaging, and media outlets choosing not to use it in their content.

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Sunday Puzzle
7:03 am
Sun August 31, 2014

The Same Until You Shuffle

NPR

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 12:31 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer this week is a made-up two-word phrase, in which both words start with 'S' and they're anagrams of each other.

Example: Identical line where two pieces of fabric are sewn together = SAME SEAM

Last week's challenge: Name a world leader of the 1960s (two words). Change the last letter of the second word. Then switch the order of the words, putting the second word in front. The result will name a hit song of the 1990s. Who is the leader, and what is the song?

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