Arts and Culture

The Scene
4:26 pm
Sat April 25, 2015

Interview: What's Up With The Lincoln Funeral Recreation?

1865, the train with a portrait of Abraham Lincoln carried his body from Washington, D.C. to Springfield
Credit Library of Congress

If you live in Springfield and ever pick up a newspaper, listen to the radio, or watch local TV- chances are incredibly slim that you don't already know about the Lincoln Funeral Recreation that will be done in town on  Saturday, May 2nd. But there's been a certain amount of confusion over what exactly will transpire. Will there be a train car that replicates the one which carried his body from D.C. to Springfield? (Answer: Yes, but it won't ride the rails as previously planned.) Where should you park and plan to enter at?

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Deceptive Cadence
4:06 pm
Sat April 25, 2015

The World Music Education of Philip Glass

Philip Glass photographed in New York City in 1980.
Jack Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 4:27 pm

It was 1964 when the young Philip Glass found himself in Paris. He was on a Fulbright scholarship to study with the revered pedagogue Nadia Boulanger. It was a career move carefully planned. Glass wanted to be a composer and he knew Boulanger's rigorous lessons in traditional Western harmony and counterpoint would sharpen his skills.

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Movies
4:06 pm
Sat April 25, 2015

Why Some Native Actors Quit 'Ridiculous Six'

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 4:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
9:15 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Imagining The Power Of Edouard Manet's 'Very Active Muse'

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 2:04 pm

Victorine Meurent was just 17 years old when she met the great Impressionist painter Edouard Manet on a Paris street in 1862. The young, poverty-stricken redhead became his favorite model, and Manet painted her reclining nude in Olympia — a work that scandalized the Paris art world in 1865 and now hangs in the Musée d'Orsay.

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Fresh Air Weekend
8:03 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Fresh Air Weekend: Toni Morrison, Ross Macdonald's Crime Fiction, Will Forte

Toni Morrison's novels include Beloved, The Bluest Eye and Song of Solomon. She won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1993.
Timothy Greenfield Sanders

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 10:14 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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Code Switch
8:03 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Questioning the Black Male Experience in America

Question Bridge: Black Males attempts to represent black male identity in America through a video question and answer exchange. Top center is Jesse Williams, the executive producer of Question Bridge.
Question Bridge: Black Males

How would you like to be remembered, in a word or two? That question was posed by a black man and answered by other black men in a multimedia art project called Question Bridge: Black Males. Some of the answers to that query included: warrior, sincere, motivated, dedicated, family-oriented, and father.

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Author Interviews
6:59 am
Sat April 25, 2015

'Save Us, Save Us': A Poem For The Migrants Lost At Sea

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 11:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Tiny Pages Reveal Big, Rodent-Related Worries In 'Devotion'

Courtesy of Riverhead Books

When it came in the mail, I thought it was a joke, this tiny little book. It was hardcover, the size of a pack of cigarettes and about as heavy in my palm as a bird. There was no jacket, just the name — Devotion: A Rat Story — and a rat, embossed in gold.

I read it in an hour, maybe a little less— it's just a hundred pages or so. An appetizer, I thought. A snack.

But two days later, I was still thinking about it. And I'm sure that it'll still be scratching around inside of my skull a week from now, like cold little rat claws scraping inside the walls.

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Author Interviews
4:27 am
Sat April 25, 2015

It's The Fuzz! Cat Detective Swipes A Claw At Crime In 'William'

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 11:36 am

By Gouda — the Mona Cheesa is missing! And when that most famous work of art is discovered to have been taken from its frame in a Paris art museum, the world's foremost International Cat of Mystery, William, is called in on the case.

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Monkey See
4:21 am
Sat April 25, 2015

The Hard Work And Close Bonds Of Competitive College A Cappella

Voices In Your Head, from the University of Chicago, performs their competition set. In the front, you can see Kari Wei — she's the one with the pitch pipe around her neck.
Joe Martinez Photography

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 11:36 am

It's been many years since I did my three semesters of college a cappella, but it remains a genre of performance for which I have enormous affection. In 2012, the arrival of Pitch Perfect meant that suddenly, I knew a lot more people who even knew what a college a cappella was.

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The Two-Way
8:44 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Jenner: 'For All Intents And Purposes, I Am A Woman'

From left, Bruce Jenner, Kanye West and Kim Kardashian attend FOX's "The X Factor" Season 2 Top 10 Live Performance Show on Nov. 21, 2012 in Hollywood, California.
Frank Micelotta AP

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 10:49 pm

Bruce Jenner, a former world-renowned track and field athlete better known in recent years from the reality TV shows of his step-daughters, the Kardashian sisters, described a lifelong struggle with gender identity in an interview with ABC's Diane Sawyer on Friday night.

"For all intents and purposes, I am a woman," Jenner said. "I was not genetically born that way ... as of now I have all the male parts. As of now we're different, but we still identify as female."

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Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
4:07 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of April 23, 2015

Originally published on

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
4:07 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of April 23, 2015

Originally published on

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Movie Interviews
4:02 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Marfa's Mexican-Americans Remember 'Giant' And Southwest Segregation

The 1956 film Giant was nominated for 10 Academy Awards and won a Best Director Oscar for George Stevens. Above, James Dean sits on set with Robert Marquez, left, and Joe Vasquez of Marfa, Texas.
Richard C. Miller, 1955

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 1:15 am

In 1956, the film Giant (based on the 1952 novel by Edna Ferber) took a piercing look at the Texas myth. It traced the rise of power from cattle ranchers to oil barons and examined the tensions between whites and Latinos. The film was nominated for 10 Academy Awards and won a best director Oscar for George Stevens.

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Author Interviews
4:02 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Don't Take His Stapler: 'Paper Clip' Author's Passion For Office Supplies

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 5:55 pm

The percussive snap of a stapler. The crisp peeling of a Post-it note. The ruffling flip of an old Rolodex chock-full of cards. James Ward loves office supplies beyond reason — and he's written about the history of everything from the pencil to the glue stick in his new book, The Perfection of the Paper Clip.

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Movies
4:02 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Native American Actors Walk Off Set of Adam Sandler Movie

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 8:11 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Bestseller List
3:03 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of April 23, 2015

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
3:03 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of April 23, 2015

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
3:03 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of April 23, 2015

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Monkey See
1:30 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Food In Pop Culture And Going Back To College

NPR

Just a very quick post this week while I work my way through my emotions about the International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella.

On the show this week, we're joined by our pals Gene Demby and Kat Chow to tackle the issue of food in culture, including cooking shows that feature great cooks, cooking shows that feature lousy cooks, and cooking shows that actually make us better at cooking. We talk about food for the soul and food for the glutton, and we learn a fascinating biographical tidbit about Kat.

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Author Interviews
12:58 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

'Pope And Mussolini' Tells The 'Secret History' Of Fascism And The Church

It's commonly thought that the Catholic Church fought heroically against the fascists in Italy. But historian David Kertzer says the church actually lent organizational strength and moral legitimacy to Mussolini's regime. Kertzer recently won a Pulitzer Prize for his book The Pope and Mussolini: The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in Europe.

Originally broadcast Jan. 25, 2014.

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Movie Reviews
12:58 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Deception And Suspense By The Sea In The Iranian Mystery 'About Elly'

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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The Two-Way
10:40 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Richard Corliss, 'Time' Film Critic, Dies At 71

Richard Corliss
Stefanie Keenan WireImage

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 11:42 am

Richard Corliss, the longtime film critic for Time, has died in New York, the magazine announced on its website. He was 71.

Corliss died Thursday night following a stroke he suffered a week ago, Time said. He is survived by his wife, Mary Corliss, and his brother Paul Corliss of New Jersey.

Time said Corliss, who reviewed films for the magazine for 35 years, "conveyed nothing so much as the sheer joy of watching movies — and writing about them.

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The Salt
10:36 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Sexy, Simple, Satirical: 300 Years Of Picnics In Art

An illustration of noblemen enjoying a feast outdoors, from a French edition of The Hunting Book of Gaston Phebus, 15th century.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 3:32 pm

As the weather warms up, you might find yourself staring out an office window, daydreaming about what you'd rather be doing: lazing outdoors, perhaps, on a large blanket with a picnic bounty spread before you.

In fact, people have been fantasizing about picnics as a return to a simpler life pretty much since the dawn of urban living, says Walter Levy, author of The Picnic: A History.

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Native American Actors Walk Off The Set Of Adam Sandler Comedy

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 11:11 am

Native American actors have walked off the set of an Adam Sandler movie that they say insults their culture.

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Book News & Features
5:33 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Rejected Decades Ago, Publisher Can't Keep 'Pioneer Girl' In Stock

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 11:27 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Code Switch
5:09 am
Fri April 24, 2015

A Look At 'Blackbird,' The First Film On The New 'Black Netflix'

Blackbird is about a gay interracial romance set in the deep South.
courtesy of blackbirdthemovie.com

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 11:27 am

A tiny independent movie has been picked by one of Hollywood's biggest moguls to promote his latest venture. Robert L. Johnson created BET and now, the Urban Movie Channel — an online channel that's being called the black Netflix.

The first original film it has acquired is a gay interracial romance set in the Deep South. In Blackbird, the main character Randy is in high school. Everyone thinks he's gay, and they're totally fine with it.

Randy, 18, is fervently religious. Even though his best friend is gay, Randy's in denial about his own sexuality.

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Art & Design
2:23 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Slow Fashion Shows Consumers What It's Made Of

The Zady clothing line sources cotton from the Texas Organic Cotton Cooperative in Lubbock, Texas.
Zady

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 12:15 pm

If you're into "slow food" — the ethical response to "fast food" — you probably want to know how the animals were treated or whether pesticides were used on your vegetables. Now, the "slow fashion" movement is in the same spirit.

"It's about understanding the process or the origins of how things are made," says Soraya Darabi, co-founder of the clothing line Zady. "Where our products come from, how they're constructed and by whom. Slow fashion is really indicative of a movement of people who want to literally slow down."

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

'24 Days' Retells A Brutal Crime With Little Explanation

Zabou Breitman plays Ruth Halimi in 24 Days.
Menemsha Films

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 11:58 am

24 Days recounts the grisly fate of Ilan Halimi, the young Jewish Parisian who in 2006 was kidnapped, held for ransom and tortured beyond what his body could endure. But it's not Ilan who addresses the camera at the beginning of the film. It's his mother, Ruth Halimi (Zabou Breitman).

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The Scene
4:31 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

The Scene: Punk, Psycho-Billy & Gypsy Jazz

The Scene is Rachel Otwell & Scott Faingold telling you their picks for what to do this coming weekend and beyond. There will be no show next week, so this installment includes a few picks from the first weekend in May as well. Tune in:

Events discussed include:

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