Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday 9-11 AM

The program wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories. 

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Middle East
11:55 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Unity Is A Difficult Mission For Christians In Israel

Arab-Israeli children ride in a float during an annual march for Virgin Mary in the northern Israeli city of Haifa on May 11. Arab Christians don't mix much with migrant or Russian Christians.
Ahmad Gharibli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:58 pm

Pope Francis visits the Mideast next week, including Israel, where Christians make up just 2 percent of the population.

But since the last papal visit to the Holy Land five years ago, the number of Christians in Israel has increased, and the makeup of the Christian population has continued to shift.

The vast majority of Israeli Christians have always been Arab and they still make up three-quarters of the 160,000 Christians living in Israel. But tens of thousands of Christians have come to Israel from Asia and Africa — both legal workers and undocumented migrants.

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Code Switch
11:24 am
Sun May 18, 2014

The American Story, As It Was Reported To The Rest Of The Nation

A display of America's first ethnic newspapers at the Newseum's new exhibit, "One Nation With News For All." The exhibit opened on May 16 and runs through Jan. 5, 2015.
Jonathan Thompson/Newseum

The first draft of American history has many authors.

And they include journalists from ethnic media: newspapers, websites, radio and TV stations dedicated to reporting news for immigrant and ethnic communities.

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Interviews
9:30 am
Sun May 18, 2014

A First Black Professor Remembers Her Segregated Education

Hortense McClinton graduated from Howard University in Washington, D.C., in the 1930s and became the first black professor at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.
Courtesy of Howard University

Originally published on Sat May 24, 2014 3:25 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Hortense McClinton has lived with a remarkable sense of determination — for 95 years.

Her father's parents were slaves, and McClinton grew up in a completely segregated society, the all-black town of Boley, Okla.

"I didn't realize how segregated everything was," she tells NPR's Lynn Neary. That changed after a visit with her uncle in Guthrie, Okla.

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Author Interviews
6:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Novel Humanizes The 'Hyena Of The Gestapo'

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 8:47 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Francine Prose's new novel "Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932" was inspired by a picture taken by the famous Hungarian photographer Brassai. It shows a lesbian couple at a club in Paris before World War II. One of the women in the photo is dressed in a tuxedo. Her hair is short and slicked back like a man. She was Violette Morris, an athlete and racecar driver whose career was cut short because she was a cross-dresser.

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Author Interviews
6:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Putting A Face Behind The 'Sting Of The Drone'

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 10:24 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Few people know the ins and outs of power politics in the nation's capital better than Richard A. Clarke. He served three presidents and as national coordinator for security and counterterrorism, he was instrumental in developing the nation's armed drone program.

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Politics
6:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

McConnell Faces Challenge From The Right In Tuesday Midterms

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 10:24 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. Primary races are picking up ahead of the midterm elections this fall. On Tuesday, voters in six states will go to the polls, making it one of the most important primary election days of the year.

Among the races to watch is a Tea Party challenge to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. To give us a lay of the land is NPR political editor Charlie Mahtesian. Charlie, welcome to the program.

CHARLES MAHTESIAN, BYLINE: Hi, Lynn.

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Sports
6:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

NBA Refs See Mistakes, But Can't Fix Them, With Instant Replay

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 10:24 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

And it's time now for sports. There are only four basketball teams left competing for this year's NBA title. Later today, the Miami Heat will play the Indiana Pacers, and tomorrow the San Antonio Spurs will take on the Oklahoma City Thunder.

But the road here has been long and bumpy, marred by some controversial calls. And that's brought attention to instant replay, a system that allows referees to look back at what happened but not call fouls retroactively. To tell us more about this, slate.com's Mike Pesca. Good morning, Mike.

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Asia
10:48 am
Sun May 11, 2014

As India Votes, Muslims Keep A Wary Eye On The Hindu Frontrunner

A group of Muslim men stand aside, waiting for a car convoy carrying candidate Narendra Modi to pass in the streets of Varanasi last week.
Roberto Schmidt AFP/Getty Images

Monday is the final day of voting in India's election, the biggest democratic exercise in the world.

India is home to more than 1 billion people, 13 percent of them Muslims. Their mistrust of Narendra Modi, the Hindu nationalist leader running for prime minister, can tell us a great deal about India, a democratic country with a long history of religious violence between the Muslim minority and the Hindu majority.

Muslims Wary Of A Modi-Run India

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The Sunday Conversation
9:51 am
Sun May 11, 2014

A Voice For Abuse Survivors Within The Catholic Church

Marie Collins (left) and Vatican spokesman father Federico Lombardi leave at the end of a press conference at the Vatican on May 3, 2014. Collins, a clergy abuse survivor, was chosen as a member of Pope Francis' abuse advisory board.
Riccardo De Luca AP

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 10:47 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

For decades Marie Collins has advocated on behalf of sex abuse victims and spoken out against the way the Catholic Church has handled the crisis.

Collins was selected by Pope Francis to sit on the new commission he set up to try to right past wrongs and to make recommendations for dealing with pedophile priests in the future.

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Television
6:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

The Pains Of Parenting, And Other Life Lessons From Louis C.K.

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 7:49 am

Louis C.K. has made a career in comedy by going places others won't. He can be shockingly crude and deeply insightful in the same sentence.

In his Emmy-award winning TV show called Louie, the comedian basically plays himself — a divorced standup comic in New York with two kids. Season 4 of the show kicked off last week.

Louie is "right where I started him, really," he tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "Some stuff happened, but he ended up back where he was, which sort of is the way things work. It's a zero-sum game, at times."

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Movie Interviews
6:34 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Director Richard Ayoade Holds Up A Dark Looking Glass In 'The Double'

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 10:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The new film "The Double" is a comedy and a love story, but a very dark one. It's based off an 1846 Dostoyevsky novella. "The Double" focuses on a guy named Simon James. He is, by all accounts, rather nondescript - the kind of guy who fades, mostly intentionally, into the background. He stammers halfway through sentences, his boss can't remember his name and he can't seem to make any impression on the girl of his dreams. Then one day at work, things get worse when Simon James' boss makes an announcement.

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Music Interviews
6:34 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Tori Amos On Where Art And Aging Intersect

Tori Amos, new album, her 14th, is called Unrepentant Geraldines.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 10:47 am

Tori Amos has been looking at a lot of artwork lately, and on a new album, she's found ways to turn the visual into the musical. Unrepentant Geraldines is a return to a familiar pop form for Amos, who has been crisscrossing the boundaries of style in recent years — as well as an artistic self-evaluation from a performer who turned 50 last year. She recently spoke with NPR's Rachel Martin about "standing by the creations" that make up her identity at midlife. Hear their conversation at the audio link.

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Sports
6:34 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Stress-Free Golf, With Holes The Size Of A Pizza

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 10:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If you're a golfer not named Tiger Woods you have surely experienced days out on the course where it felt like the hole was the size of a penny. Rather than hurl your clubs, now you can try big-hole golf. It's a new twist on a very traditional sport where the hole is the size of an extra-large pizza. Intrigued?

To hear more, we are joined by John Paul Newport. He's the gold columnist at The Wall Street Journal and recently played a round of golf with the bigger bull's-eye. Hey, John Paul. Thanks for being with us.

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Politics
10:33 am
Sun May 4, 2014

Boehner Plays It Loose With His Speakership At Stake

While House Speaker John Boehner is almost certain to win re-election in his suburban Cincinnati district, his prospects of being re-elected as speaker are far less clear.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 12:32 pm

House Speaker John Boehner is almost certain to win re-election in his suburban Cincinnati district, but that will only get him back to Congress.

To get another term as speaker, he'll need to win a floor vote that doesn't happen until January — and Boehner's prospects in that contest are far less clear.

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Asia
10:28 am
Sun May 4, 2014

Marathoning In Pyongyang: A Unique Way To See The City

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 12:06 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This past month in North Korea, Will Phillipps was one of a group of foreign amateur runners who were allowed to participate for the first time in the Pyongyang marathon. Phillipps is a British expat living in Beijing. And he wrote about his experience for the Roads and Kingdoms online travel magazine. We reached them via Skype, and he told us that, as you can imagine, there were a few restrictions for participants.

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Alt.Latino: Show
8:41 am
Sun May 4, 2014

Knock Your Wool Socks Off With New Latin Music

Brazilian rapper Karol Conka.
Mariana Zarpellon Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 12:55 pm

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Author Interviews
6:38 am
Sun May 4, 2014

A Quest For Higher Power In 'The Snow Queen'

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 12:06 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The writer Michael Cunningham is probably best known for his book "The Hours," which won him a Pulitzer Prize and was made into a film. Like "The Hours," Cunningham's new novel, "The Snow Queen," explores inner lives and family dynamics. But the characters in this new book also plunge into the metaphysical world. When I spoke with Michael Cunningham this past week, I asked him to read from a section of his new novel. It's a scene where one of the main characters, a man named Barrett, sees an ethereal light in the skies above N.Y.

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Sports
6:38 am
Sun May 4, 2014

Football Team Helps Make One High School Out Of Two

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 12:06 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

At Martin Luther King High School in Philadelphia, football is more than a sport. It's an escape.

(SOUNDBITE OF DOCUMENTARY, "WE COULD BE KING")

UNIDENTIFIED STUDENT #1: I plan to move out of Philly 'cause it's not getting any better.

UNIDENTIFIED STUDENT #2: Hearing gunshots on a daily basis was nothing new. If you live in Philadelphia, I'm sure you agree, life is rough. Times are hard and sometimes you want to give up. I do, too.

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Music Reviews
6:38 am
Sun May 4, 2014

Alt Latino Spring Cleaning: Cover Songs From The Mailbox

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 11:32 am

NPR's Rachel Martin chats with Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd of NPR Music's AltLatino. This week they tackle cover songs.

Politics
6:38 am
Sun May 4, 2014

The Story Of The Parties' Crucial Appeals To Women In 'She Votes'

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 12:06 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. We are six months away from this year's midterm elections, and Democrats and Republicans are ramping up campaign messaging. Both parties agree women could hold the key to victory in November. And many of the most endangered incumbents and high-profile challengers are also women.

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Shots - Health News
11:00 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Giving Up On Its Obamacare Exchange No Cure For Oregon's Ills

Oregon was an early adopter of the Affordable Care Act, and ran a series of ads encouraging all Oregonians to sign up for health insurance. But their website never became fully functional.
Cover Oregon

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Oregon has been "all in" on health reform. Its embrace of the Affordable Care Act includes a very successful Medicaid expansion, a $2 billion federal experiment to show the state can save money by managing patients' care better, and, of course, the state's own online marketplace to sell Obamacare insurance.

But that last point has been a huge problem.

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Science
9:45 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Fossil Fans Get Their Dino-Fix Before Smithsonian Renovates

A cast of a Tyrannosaurus rex skull greets visitors as they enter the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Huge lines of people, kids in tow, are waiting to get into the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, the world's second-most visited museum.

Right inside the lobby, a cast of the skull of the new Tyrannosaurus rex the museum just acquired is stopping visitors dead in their tracks.

"We wanted to get up here before the exhibit for the dinosaurs closed," says Crystal Epley, who took a three-hour trip from Broadway, Va., to bring her son, John.

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Interviews
9:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

The Risk And Reward Of Monitoring Elections In The Middle East

Election officials count ballots under the scrutiny of monitors in Iraq in 2005. Les Campbell from the National Democratic Institute worked as an election monitor during Iraq's 2005 elections, a job that came with a flak jacket and security detail.
Sasa Kralj AP

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Iraq is suffering the worst spate of violence in many years — some say the worst since the height of the U.S. war in 2008. On Friday, dozens of people were killed at an election rally in Baghdad. This Wednesday, Iraqis will go to the polls in the first parliamentary election since the U.S. pulled combat troops out in 2011.

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Movies
8:31 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Artist Ralph Steadman: A Nice Man, For A Pictorial Assassin

Steadman's drawing of Hunter S. Thompson's car beset by huge bats illustrated Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas in 1971.
Courtesy of Ralph Steadman/Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Ralph Steadman is known to most Americans for the surreal illustrations he drew to accompany Hunter S. Thompson's articles and books, including Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

But Steadman has drawn everything from extinct birds to savage political caricatures to wine and beer labels. He's even written an opera libretto.

The British artist is also the subject of a documentary, titled For No Good Reason, narrated by Johnny Depp.

Such A Nice Man, Such Dangerous Drawings

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Afghanistan
7:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Ancient Form Of Poetry Captures Afghan Women's Lives

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Eliza Griswold has reported from Afghanistan for more than a decade, writing news features for the New York Times magazine and other publications. She thought she had a pretty good grip on the country's politics and culture, but it wasn't until she started exploring Afghan women's poetry that she discovered a different side of women's lives there. What she found was a complex world of rage, empowerment, sorrow and sex.

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Arts & Life
7:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Like So Many Magazines, 'Ladies' Home Journal' Cuts Back

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Ladies' Home Journal, the magazine that was once so popular with housewives and homemakers, is ending its 130-year run as a monthly magazine. The print magazine business has of course changed dramatically in the last few decades.

And Ladies' Home Journal saw its own advertising revenues drop by more than 50 percent over the last 10 years. But this story isn't just about business as you might expect. NPR's Zoe Chace explains women have changed too.

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Music Interviews
7:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Brian Blade Finds A 'Landmark' In His Shreveport Roots

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Drummer Brian Blade's rhythm has propelled the music of everyone from Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell to Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock. But he's also a composer with his own group. "Landmarks" is the new album from Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band.

(SOUNDBITE OF ALBUM, "LANDMARKS")

MARTIN: Blade records in his brother Brady's studio in Shreveport, Louisiana. And he joins us from there today. Welcome to the program, Brian.

BRIAN BLADE: Thank you, Rachel.

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The Sunday Conversation
10:53 am
Sun April 20, 2014

A Witness To The Bombing, A Nurse Returns To Boston As A Runner

Amelia Nelson (right) and her friend Kristy were volunteers at the 2013 Boston Marathon when the bombings happened.
Courtesy of Amelia Nelson

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

As a volunteer for the 2013 Boston Marathon, nurse Amelia Nelson thought should would be there to help runners as they came across the finish line.

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Religion
10:28 am
Sun April 20, 2014

This May Be Rogue Parishioners' Last Easter In Closed Church

Since 2004, members of the Saint Frances Cabrini Catholic Church have continuously occupied the building to keep it from shutting down.
Maryellen Rogers

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 10:53 am

Nearly a decade has passed since the doors of the Saint Frances Cabrini Catholic Church were shut and its holy water dried up.

With the Archdiocese of Boston strapped for cash, it was one of dozens of churches in the area to be closed and sold off. At the time, the archdiocese was in the throes of the clergy sex abuse crisis. It had agreed to pay nearly $85 million to more than 500 people who said they were abused by priests.

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Theater
9:49 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Daniel Radcliffe's 'Crippled' Role Reaches Out To The Remote

Daniel Radcliffe (right) plays Billy, in a scene with Pat Shortt as Johnnypateenmike, in the Broadway production of Martin McDonagh's The Cripple of Inishmaan.
Johan Persson Michael Grandage Company

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 10:53 am

Even before he finished his eight-film run as Harry Potter, actor Daniel Radcliffe spent a considerable time devoted to the stage, both in London and New York. He appeared on Broadway in Equus and spent a year playing J. Pierrepont Finch, the lead role in the musical How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.

On Sunday night, the 24-year-old actor opens at Broadway's Cort Theatre in a production of Martin McDonagh's dark Irish comedy, The Cripple of Inishmaan.

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