Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday 9-11 AM

The program wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories. 

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The Howard Project
7:59 am
Sun March 29, 2015

Love Is In The Air: Howard Students Talk Romance, Relationships

Howard University students (left to right) Kevin Peterman, Taylor Davis, Leighton Watson and Ariel Alford are the subjects of NPR's Project Howard. They'll be keeping audio diaries as they finish their final semester of college and look toward their futures.
Robb Hill for NPR

Originally published on Sun March 29, 2015 9:48 am

Spring has arrived and young people's fancies might be turning (lightly or not-so-lightly) to thoughts of love.

With that in mind, NPR's Weekend Edition asked the college students of The Howard Project — who have spent the last few weeks giving us insights into their lives during their last semester of college — about how dating and romance fit into their college experience.

Click on the audio link above to hear their stories, to a soundtrack of their favorite love songs — or read some of their answers below.

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Law
7:43 am
Sun March 29, 2015

For Undercover Agents, On-The-Job Adrenaline Can Be Addictive

Retired agent Michael Vigil on a search and destroy operation in the Colombian jungle. "As an undercover, you're basically kind of an independent operator ... and it's very addictive." says Laura Brodie, a criminal and forensic psychologist.
Courtesy Michael Vigil

Originally published on Sun March 29, 2015 4:51 pm

Danger, subterfuge, adrenaline — as more agencies use undercover operatives, we take a look at what it's like to take on a false identity professionally.

A recent report out says the agency has made major improvements since Sept. 11, but still needs to boost its ability to collect intelligence.

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Sunday Puzzle
7:09 am
Sun March 29, 2015

For This Puzzle, Watch Your Words

NPR

Originally published on Sun March 29, 2015 9:33 am

On-air challenge: The challenge is a game of Categories based on the word "watch." For each category provided, name something in the category starting with each of the letters W-A-T-C-H. For example, parts of the human body would be "waist," "arm," "thigh," "chest" and "head."

Last week's challenge: Take the word "die." Think of two synonyms for this word that are themselves exact opposites of each other. What two words are these? A hint: they have the same number of letters.

Answer: Pass, fail

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Afghanistan
7:05 am
Sun March 29, 2015

Afghan Chief Executive: Leaders Set Aside Egos To Rally For Nation

Afghanistan's Chief Executive Officer Abdullah Abdullah (left) stands with President Ashraf Ghani, Vice President Joe Bidden, Defense Secretary Ash Carter and Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Buchanan at a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns on Tuesday.
Andrew Harnik AP

Originally published on Sun March 29, 2015 9:33 am

Afghanistan's leaders were in Washington last week asking for more assistance from the U.S. They got what they wanted: President Obama announced he would postpone the withdrawal of thousands of U.S. troops this year. Those forces are needed to help Afghanistan troops battle the Taliban as the spring
fighting season heats up.

President Ashraf Ghani was accompanied on this trip by Abdullah Abdullah, the chief executive of the Afghan government. They were bitter rivals in Afghanistan's presidential election last year and are now sharing power in a unity government.

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StoryCorps
6:51 am
Sun March 29, 2015

Accepting His Daughter As Gay Was Like A Weight 'Lifted Off Me'

Deidra Robinson and her father, William Watford III, were extremely close — until she told him she was gay.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sun March 29, 2015 9:33 am

StoryCorps' OutLoud initiative records stories from the LGBTQ community.

Deidra Robinson and her father, William Watford III, were extremely close — until she told him she was gay.

They came to StoryCorps in Homewood, a suburb of Birmingham, Ala., to talk about that moment.

Their story may sound familiar to many families.

"I looked at you and I said, 'Do you want to hear it?' " Robinson tells her father. "Do you remember what you told me?"

"No," Watford answers.

"You were like, 'No, I don't want to hear it,' " she recalls.

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Parallels
8:53 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Qatar Digital Library Preserves The Music Of A Vanishing Past

Ṣawt musicians during a performance in Kuwait in May 2014.
Rolf Killius Qatar Digital Library

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 12:30 pm

The songs our grandparents sang can tell us who we are. Here in the U.S., the Lomax family became famous in the 1930s, when they recorded America's folk music.

In other countries that are changing fast, people are also trying to hold onto their heritage. The tiny, super-rich state of Qatar takes pride in its modernity, with its gleaming skyscrapers and lucrative gas fields. But it is also investing in a huge history project.

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Arts & Life
7:51 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Decades Before YouTube, Video Pioneers Captured Turbulent Era

From left, Videofreex David Cort, Bart Friedman and Parry Teasdale filmed kids' programs and daily goings-on in 1973 at their Maple Tree Farm in Lanesville, N.Y.
John Dominis Courtesy of Videofreex

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 11:02 am

Back in the pre-digital era — when telephones were used for talking, not photographing and filming, and before YouTube came along to broadcast everyone's videos — capturing and disseminating moving images was expensive, time consuming and decidedly non-portable.

But that changed in 1967, when Sony introduced the world's first portable video tape recorder. Before long, enthusiasts formed "media collectives" that captured the social and cultural upheaval of the era. Fueled by a mix of the tunes, the tokes and the times, video became part of the revolution it was documenting.

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Humans
7:09 am
Sun March 22, 2015

It's Not a Junk Drawer. It's An Archive Of An Interesting Life

The contents of Weekend Edition host Rachel Martin's junk drawer. What's in yours?
Rachel Martin NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 11:36 am

Spring is finally here, and in the coming weeks many of us may find ourselves infected with a fever to clean. It's time to weed out your wardrobe, vacuum behind the couch, and maybe even dig into the depths of your pantry and chuck those decade-old granola bars.

But there's one place that might get a pass: the junk drawer. You know you've got one.

"Everyone has a junk drawer," says Kit Yarrow, consumer psychologist at Golden Gate University.

Yarrow should know. As part of her job, she pokes around in other people's junk drawers.

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Author Interviews
7:02 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Author: Kids Need Abundant Connection With Nature

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 8:19 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Scott Sampson has a big fancy title. He's the vice president of research and collections at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. But to a whole lot of American kids, he's this guy...

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Sports
7:02 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Actual Dramatic Comebacks Are Rare In NCAA Tournament

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 8:19 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Interviews
9:25 am
Sun March 15, 2015

The Truth About Humanitarian Work: High Ideals Vs. Hard Realities

UNICEF workers assemble "school infection prevention kits" in Monrovia, Liberia, to stop the spread of Ebola back in January.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 15, 2015 10:03 am

The Syrian civil war has dragged on for four years now. Hundreds of thousands of Syrians have died and more than 3 million have been displaced.

The refugee crisis there has attracted humanitarian aid workers hoping to make a difference. Kayla Mueller was one of them. The 26-year-old Arizona native was captured by the self-proclaimed Islamic State in August of 2013. She was killed last month.

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Around the Nation
9:25 am
Sun March 15, 2015

Instead Of Tickets, N.H. Police Hand Out Good-Deed Coupons

Originally published on Sun March 15, 2015 10:03 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Police in Farmington, N.H., are issuing tickets all over town. But these are tickets you might not mind getting.

CHIEF JOHN DRURY: They're for a slice of pizza or a small French fry.

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Movies
8:29 am
Sun March 15, 2015

Gather Ye Rosebuds: 'Citizen Kane' Screened At Hearst Castle

Hearst Castle, the estate of newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, hosted its first-ever screening of Citizen Kane on Friday. Hearst hated the movie, and never allowed it to be shown there during his lifetime.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 3:47 pm

Citizen Kane has been called the best film ever made. It was also at the center of an epic battle of egos.

The main character was modeled after media titan William Randolph Hearst, who in real life tried ruthlessly to keep the movie from being released.

Almost 75 years later, the family has called a truce, of sorts: This weekend, Citizen Kane was screened for the first time inside the millionaire's legendary home, the Hearst Castle.

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Strange News
7:48 am
Sun March 15, 2015

Haunted Dolls Are A Thing, And They're Not Cheap, Either

Some dolls just don't seem quite right.
Jak Hutchcraft

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 11:56 am

Some childhood symbols straddle the line between adorable and terrifying. Like clowns. Or Furbys.

Some dolls fit the category, too, with spooky eyes that seem to move or a porcelain pallor. They're not all Chucky, but some of them just don't seem quite right.

Listener Anne McLaughlin grew up with a cabinet full of dolls — including a pretty dancer doll and a set of wooden nesting dolls. But one, she says, stood out.

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Sunday Puzzle
7:03 am
Sun March 15, 2015

Say Yes To The Puzzle

NPR

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 11:55 am

On-air challenge: "Yes" is supposed to be the most pleasing word in the English language. And if that's true, today's puzzle will be very pleasing indeed. Every answer is an anagram of "yes" plus two or three other letters.

Last week's challenge: Take a familiar phrase in the form "[blank] and [blank]." Put the second word in front of the first, and you'll name a common part of a large company. What is it?

Answer: "Room and board," boardroom

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Food
6:53 am
Sun March 15, 2015

The Elixir Du Jour: Bone Broth

Originally published on Sun March 15, 2015 10:03 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
6:53 am
Sun March 15, 2015

Portugal Beckons With Back Alleys And Boarded-Up Businesses

Originally published on Sun March 15, 2015 10:03 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
9:01 am
Sun March 8, 2015

Venezuela's Maduro Sees Only Plots As His Economy Crumbles

Between two portraits of Venezuela's hero Simon Bolivar in the background, President Nicolas Maduro speaks at a press conference in Caracas. Maduro blames the U.S. for plotting against him.
Ariana Cubillos AP

Originally published on Sun March 8, 2015 12:08 pm

As the U.S. prepares to reopen its embassy in communist Cuba, relations with another Latin American nation — oil-rich Venezuela — are crumbling.

President Nicolas Maduro accuses the U.S. of plotting a coup against him, and is expelling most U.S. diplomats from Venezuela. He is also demanding that Americans secure visas to enter the country.

The visa requirement is still so new that upon my arrival in Caracas this week without one, the immigration official doesn't even notice. She stamps my U.S. passport and says, "Welcome."

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The Howard Project
8:41 am
Sun March 8, 2015

Education May Be Priceless, But A College Degree Isn't

"The Howard Project" participants Kevin Peterman (top left), Leighton Watson, Ariel Alford (bottom left) and Taylor Davis, shown in the Howard University library, are offering insights into their thoughts and fears as they approach the end of the senior year.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun March 8, 2015 12:08 pm

Paying for college gets more expensive every year.

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Americans owe more than a trillion dollars in outstanding student loan payments.

The result can be a lot of pressure for college grads. The four seniors participating in our Howard Project — Ariel Alford, Taylor Davis, Leighton Watson and Kevin Peterman — talk to us about finances.

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Around the Nation
7:53 am
Sun March 8, 2015

Learning The Hard Truth About Lying

Marilee Jones, former MIT dean of admissions and now a college admissions consultant.
Courtesy Marilee Jones

Originally published on Sun March 8, 2015 12:08 pm

We all lie sometimes. But if you're in the public eye, the lie can take on a life of its own.

NBC's Brian Williams became the victim of his own story last month, exaggerating the danger he faced while reporting in Iraq in 2003. It lead to an on-air mea culpa and a temporary suspension from the anchor desk.

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Animals
7:10 am
Sun March 8, 2015

Elephants Will Retire From Barnum And Bailey Circus

Originally published on Sun March 8, 2015 12:08 pm

Copyright 2015 The Nation. To see more, visit http://www.thenation.com/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
7:10 am
Sun March 8, 2015

Broken Family Needs To Have A 'Man At The Helm'

Originally published on Sun March 8, 2015 12:08 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
7:18 am
Sun March 1, 2015

In Israel, Jewish Divorce Is Granted Only By Husband's Permission

In Gett, the character Viviane Ansalem wants a divorce but her husband will not give permission. In Israel, if you're Jewish, even if you're not religious, you have to be divorced by Jewish law.
Courtesy Music Box Films

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 2:07 pm

In Israel, religious law governs family matters.

For a Jewish divorce, an Orthodox rabbi oversees a ritual that begins with the husband placing a folded decree, called a get or gett, into the wife's cupped hands. But that paper can be hard to obtain, because the husband can refuse to grant the divorce.

A new Israeli film playing in the U.S. shows how patriarchal Jewish divorce laws can trap even secular women for years.

The film is a drama called Gett: The Trial of Viviane Ansalem. Viviane wants a divorce but needs her husband's permission.

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Europe
7:18 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Thousands March In Moscow In Memory Of Murdered Putin Critic

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 2:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Strange News
7:18 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Watermelon Wedge Issue Ripens In Oklahoma

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 2:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
7:29 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Imagining The Future: 'Howard Project' Students Look Forward

"Howard Project" participants (left to right) Kevin Peterman, Taylor Davis, Ariel Alford and Leighton Watson in the Howard University library.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 11:36 am

In some ways, the questions young people grapple with are universal: Who are you? What's important to you? What kind of life do you want?

But at the same time, those questions are profoundly shaped by each person's experience.

As part of an ongoing conversation on Weekend Edition, four college seniors at a historically black university in Washington, D.C., are sharing insight into their experiences — both shared and individual.

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Sunday Puzzle
7:03 am
Sun February 22, 2015

And The Oscar Goes To ...

NPR

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 8:04 am

On-air challenge: Every answer today is the name of an Academy Award winner or nominee for best picture. Using the given anagram, decipher the title of the film. The films will go from oldest to newest. Example: OUTWORN (1940) (2 words). Answer: OUR TOWN

Last week's challenge: Name a major U.S. city in two syllables. Reverse the syllables phonetically to get the cost of attending a certain NBA game. What is it?

Answer: Phoenix, Knicks fee

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Middle East
7:01 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Turkey Launches Operation Across Syria's Border

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 11:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
7:01 am
Sun February 22, 2015

The Week In Sports: 76ers On A Rebuilding Spree

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 11:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Africa
11:49 am
Sun February 15, 2015

With Oil Fields Under Attack, Libya's Economic Future Looks Bleak

Libya's oil terminals — like the Brega refinery and oil terminal, pictured in March 11, 2014 — are being fought over by militias and by the nation's two rival governments. The conflict is drying up production, and may have a devastating impact on the nation's battered economy.
Abdullah Doma AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 8:57 am

The headquarters of the National Oil Corporation in Tripoli are gleaming, the floors marble, the offices decked out with black leather chairs and fake flowers. It seems far from the fighting going on over oil terminals around the country.

But the man in charge looks at production and knows the future is bleak.

"We cannot produce. We are losing 80 percent of our production," says Mustapha Sanallah, the chairman of Libya's National Oil Corporation.

He looks like a typical executive, decked out in a suit and glasses. But beneath his calm veneer, he's worried.

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