Morning Edition

4-9 weekday mornings.

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. 

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Strange News
5:38 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Bland Meets Dull In Scotland

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 5:01 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Pop Culture
4:39 am
Thu August 1, 2013

'Brony' Convention Takes Off Like Magical Winged Pony

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 9:23 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

In the '80s, My Little Pony was a toy line and TV franchise aimed at little girls. Well, today an expanding group of grown men are fans of the pastel-colored ponies. They call themselves Bronies. This weekend, thousands are heading to Baltimore for BronyCon 2013. There'll be music inspired by My Little Pony, Brony Dance-offs, even some academic pony panels. BronyCon began two years ago with a hundred attendees. Like a magical flying pony, the thing's taking off,

NPR Story
3:49 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Who Will Be The Next Fed Chairman?

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 9:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:49 am
Thu August 1, 2013

For Once, Congress Plans To Go On Recess Without A Meltdown

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 9:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. This is likely the last day the Senate will be in session until mid-September. Tomorrow members of the House will lave town as well. They're heading out for their August recess with none of the frantic legislative scrambles and deal making that typically end a summer session. Instead, lawmakers seem to be saving their strength for epic battles when they get back. Here's NPR's David Welna.

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NPR Story
3:49 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Opposition Claims Fraud In Zimbabwe Election

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 5:01 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Zimbabwe, polling stations stayed opened late into the night yesterday to allow for the massive turnout of voters who've been waiting in long lines to cast ballots for a president and parliament. But today, the country's main opposition candidate, Morgan Tsvangirai, is claiming intimidation and poll rigging in the election.

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Business
2:03 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Firm Hopes 'Owning Nashville' Will Pay Off For Investors

A new fund trading on the New York Stock Exchange will allow investors to put money in companies that all call Nashville home. The manager's of the fund hope to expand the project to other cities.
Walter G. Arce CSM /Landov

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 9:23 am

There's a hot stock tip floating around Nashville, and it's a first-of-its-kind investment fund that begins trading on the New York Stock Exchange Thursday.

The fund is a collection of stocks in publicly traded companies that have one thing in common: the city they call home.

When people buy into the Nashville Area Exchange Traded Fund — which starts trading at $25 a share — they will essentially be placing a bet based on an area code.

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Animals
2:03 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Jack Longino, 'The Astonishing Ant Man,' Finds 33 New Species

A side view of the new ant species Eurhopalothrix zipacna. Mounting glue and paper appear beneath the ant, one of 33 new species discovered in Central America by Jack Longino, a biologist at the University of Utah.
John T. Longino University of Utah

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 5:01 pm

While many of us spend our working days staring into an electronic box or dozing at meetings, there are some who prefer to crawl through tropical rain forests. People like "the astonishing ant man."

That's what his students call Jack Longino. Longino started out collecting stamps in his childhood, but that got boring fast. Man-made things just didn't thrill, so Longino decided to "get small."

As in: "If you're shopping for a home entertainment system," he says, "you can't do better than a good dissecting microscope."

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Business
2:02 am
Thu August 1, 2013

As Back-To-School Shopping Begins, Consumers May Turn Frugal

Chris Viehland helps her daughter Jenna try on shoes for the new school year at a Famous Footwear store in Fenton, Mo., Aug. 9, 2012.
Christian Gooden MCT/Landov

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 5:01 pm

As August begins, retailers are stepping up sales promotions to attract back-to-school shoppers. And several states are offering tax-free shopping to encourage purchases.

But most economists say this year's sales will be slower than last summer's because consumers have been coping with more expensive gasoline and higher payroll taxes.

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The Two-Way
7:52 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Sold! First Parcels Auctioned For Future Offshore Wind Farms

The offshore wind farm in the North Sea near Borkum, Germany, is nearly complete. The Riffgat facility, seen here on June 23, includes 30 turbines, each with a generating capacity of 3.6 megawatts.
David Hecker Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 5:01 pm

A Rhode Island company was the highest bidder in the federal government's first-ever auction for the right to build an offshore wind farm.

After 11 rounds, Deepwater Wind outbid two other companies for two patches of ocean off the coasts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The winning bid was $3.8 million.

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Economy
9:41 am
Wed July 31, 2013

GDP Report Is Better Than Economists Expected

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts begins with some surprising economic growth.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The U.S. Commerce Department says the economy grew at an unexpectedly swift pace during the second quarter of the year. The Gross Domestic Product, or GDP, grew at an annual rate of 1.7 percent. That compares to the first quarter, when it grew at 1.1 percent. As NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, this might mean the economy has not been hit hard by the automatic government spending cuts known as sequestration.

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Movies
4:37 am
Wed July 31, 2013

It's Alive! 'Frankenstein' Poster Brings In Big Bucks

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. It's alive!

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's alive!

Animals
4:37 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Homepage Mistake May Get Kitten A Home

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Briefly on the Chicago Tribune homepage yesterday, the main story was a photo of an adorable, gray kitten. The headline read, quote, "Headline Test Here." It was, of course, a mistake, and Web managers took it down right away. But the screenshot made a lot of people grin, and the Trib says it could mean good fortune for kitty in the photo. He's Benton, a local cat up for adoption. And since his homepage stardom, he's been getting a lot of attention from potential adopters.

NPR Story
3:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Zimbabwean Author On Mugabe's Quest To Hold On To Power

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 5:59 am

Renee Montagne talks with Zimbabwean author Peter Godwin about Zimbabwe's presidential election and Robert Mugabe's quest to continue his grip on power.

NPR Story
3:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Zimbabweans To Cast Ballots In Presidential Race

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. People in Zimbabwe are voting today in a presidential election that features an incumbent who's been in office for 33 years. President Robert Mugabe is now 89 and has been in office since he led a rebellion freeing Zimbabwe from colonialism.

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NPR Story
3:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Spanish-Language Radio Star Yanked Off The Air

A week after Eddie "Piolín" Sotelo's show was canceled, allegations of sexual harassment have surfaced.
Valerie Macon Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 11:49 am

Last week, the Univision Radio network suddenly canceled its popular, nationally syndicated morning show, Piolín Por La Mañana, hosted by Eddie Sotelo. Sotelo is known as 'Piolín,' or 'Tweety Bird' in Spanish, and his irreverent program was once the top radio program in Los Angeles.

For seven hours each weekday morning, Sotelo cracked silly jokes and double entendres, played Mexican regional music and sometimes got political.

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Business
3:00 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Ford Taking America's Best-Selling Truck All 'Natural'

A version of Ford's flagship F-150 pickup truck that runs on natural gas.
Courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 5:59 am

The reigning king in the truck world is the Ford F-150, and it's been that way for a couple of decades. But staying on top is getting harder.

With new, tougher fuel standards looming there is a lot of emphasis on efficiency and innovation. On Wednesday, Ford is announcing its flagship truck is taking a step into the alternative fuel world with a vehicle that can run on natural gas.

When you look at their bottom lines and their advertising you realize that the Detroit Three make cars, but they're really truck companies, especially Ford.

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Sweetness And Light
2:33 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Why Would You Volunteer For Next Year's Super Bowl?

Super Bowl volunteer Ben Schreiber distributes fan guides to any of the thousands of people who may need them while visiting Indianapolis for Super Bowl XLVI festivities, in 2012.
Chad Ryan CSM /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:40 pm

I read the other day that 16,000 people have been recruited as volunteers for next year's Super Bowl in New Jersey, and suddenly it occurred to me: the Super Bowl is one of the great financial bonanzas of modern times. From the players to the networks to the hotels, everybody involved with it makes a killing. Why would anybody volunteer to work for free for the Super Bowl? Would you volunteer to work free for Netflix or Disneyworld?

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Sports
2:33 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Pickleball, Anyone? Senior Athletes Play New Games And Old

Hazel Trexler-Campbell throws spray-painted horseshoes during the Senior Games in Cleveland on July 23.
Benjamin Morris for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 10:23 am

A lot of what you'd see at the National Senior Games looks familiar if you've ever watched the Summer Olympics: There's track and field, basketball and swimming. At the Summer Olympics, however, you will not hear voices in the crowd cheering "Go, Grandma!"

Everyone at these games is over 50, and they play some sports that will likely never appear at the Olympics. Here's a sample:

Pickleball

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U.S.
2:12 am
Wed July 31, 2013

In Florida, A Clash Over Exhuming Bodies At Reform School

Metal crosses mark graves at the cemetery of the former Arthur Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Investigators in Florida using ground-penetrating radar and soil samples say there are nearly 100 unmarked graves on the grounds.
Michael Spooneybarger Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 11:32 am

Researchers at the University of South Florida are fighting with the state over access to the grounds of a now-closed reform school.

For decades, the Dozier School for Boys was notorious for the harsh treatment boys received there. Now, a forensic anthropologist and her team want permission to exhume dozens of bodies they found in unmarked graves, but are meeting resistance from state officials.

White House Boys

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The Salt
2:09 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Farm Laborers Get A Foothold With Their Own Organic Farms

Agricultural work, which is physically demanding, is also a risky business venture.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 1:01 pm

Northern California's Salinas Valley is often dubbed America's salad bowl. Large growers there have long relied on thousands of seasonal workers from rural Mexico to pick lettuce, spinach and celery from sunrise to sunset. Many of these workers seem destined for a life in the fields. But a program that helps field workers, like Raul Murillo, start their own farms and businesses is starting to yield a few success stories.

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Around the Nation
5:40 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Giant KFC Bucket Not Your Typical Yard Decoration

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. In Waynesboro, Georgia, Aleena Headrick thought she was hallucinating when she saw a huge Kentucky Fried Chicken bucket in her front yard. Turns out her landlord collects vintage signs and put it there. It quickly became a big draw for gawkers, which Headrick finds amusing.

Around the Nation
4:51 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Missing Class Ring Turns Up 65 Years Later

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:46 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Richard Diedrich of Illinois lost his high school class ring in 1948. His girlfriend had been wearing it, but removed it to dissect a frog in biology class. It disappeared. Sixty-five years later, a guy name Mike Geiger was using a metal detector on a Wisconsin lake. He found the ring and contacted the school, looking for an alum with the initials RD. He says the first RD he reached wasn't friendly. The second can't believe he's got his ring again at age 82.

NPR Story
4:25 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Survey Shows Regional Divide On Abortion

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

American attitudes towards abortion reflects strong regional differences in opinion, and a new poll shows that divide seems to be growing. For more on what Americans have to say about abortion, we're joined now by Michael Dimock. He's the director of the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, which conducted the survey. Good morning.

MICHAEL DIMOCK: Good morning.

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NPR Story
4:25 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Yellen Emerges As A Top Choice To Lead Federal Reserve

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:46 am

Janet Yellen is on President Obama's short list to replace Ben Bernanke at the Federal Reserve.

NPR Story
4:25 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Police: Jailbreak In Pakistan Frees More Than 250

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Pakistan, militants armed with heavy weapons have attacked a prison not far from the border with Afghanistan. According to police, around 250 prisoners were freed. The Pakistani Taliban is taking responsibility for the violent attack, which included mortars and rocket-propelled grenades. The hours-long middle-of-the-night battle left at least a dozen people dead, guards and civilians. With us now from the capital Islamabad is Sebastian Abbot. He's the bureau chief for the Associated Press there, and thank you for joining us.

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Health Care
2:52 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Montana's State-Run Free Clinic Sees Early Success

Montana opened the first government-run medical clinic for state employees last fall. A year later, the state says the clinic is already saving money.
Dan Boyce for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:46 am

A year ago, Montana opened the nation's first clinic for free primary healthcare services to its state government employees. The Helena, Mont., clinic was pitched as a way to improve overall employee health, but the idea has faced its fair share of political opposition.

A year later, the state says the clinic is already saving money.

Pamela Weitz, a 61-year-old state library technician, was skeptical about the place at first.

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Movie Interviews
2:51 am
Tue July 30, 2013

'Smash & Grab': How Pink Panthers Stole Millions In Jewels

Havana Marking's documentary Smash and Grab depicts members of the Pink Panthers, an international ring of jewel thieves.
Goldcrest Films

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 11:21 am

In this age of cyber-crime and online espionage, here's a good old-fashioned story about cops and robbers: Smash & Grab, a new documentary film opening in New York on Wednesday, details the exploits of the "Pink Panthers" — a group of international jewel thieves that, for the past decade, has targeted high-end jewelry shops across Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

According to the international police agency, Interpol, the Pink Panthers have stolen nearly a half a billion dollars worth of jewels over roughly 500 robberies.

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The Salt
2:51 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Fast-Food Strikers Demand A 'Living Wage'

People gathered outside a Wendy's restaurant in New York City on Monday as part of a one-day strike calling for higher wages for fast-food workers.
Justin Lane EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 7:22 am

At a Wendy's restaurant in Lower Manhattan on Monday, protesters urged the lunchtime crowd to skip the Value Menu for one day. They blocked the sidewalk and half of the street.

Shanell Young held a red strike sign over her head. Young earns the minimum wage, $7.25 an hour, at another Wendy's in New York. She says that's not enough to support her and her 5-year-old son.

"It's horrible," says Young. "Everything goes up. It's unfair. You can't find an apartment. You can't pay for children's school uniforms. Everything is unfair. We can't live off this."

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Research News
2:15 am
Tue July 30, 2013

For Some Mammals It's One Love, But Reasons Still Unclear

Golden lion tamarins are one species that are largely monogamous.
Felipe Dana AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 10:11 am

Fewer than 10 percent of all mammal species are monogamous. In fact, biologists have long disagreed over why monogamy exists at all. That's the subject of two studies published this week — and they come to different conclusions.

Animals that leave the most offspring win the race to spread their genes and to perpetuate their lineage. So for most mammals, males have a simple strategy: Mate with as many females as possible.

"Monogamy is a problem," says Dieter Lukas, a biologist at Cambridge University. "Why should a male keep to one female?"

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Animals
4:31 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Putin Puckers Up For 46-Pound Pike In Video

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 6:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Russian President Vladimir Putin is known for getting out and experiencing the great outdoors. All of his pursuits are meticulously documented by the media. He's ridden horseback shirtless, tranquilized a tiger, plunged into a lake in a submarine, and led migrating birds in a motorized glider.

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