Morning Edition

4-9 weekday mornings.

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. 

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Sports
4:36 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Major League Baseball Works To Win Fans' Trust

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:06 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

So now the challenge for Major League Baseball: Winning back the trust of fans. The suspensions themselves were a start but there is a wrinkle because, as we've heard, Alex Rodriguez is appealing his 211-game ban. It means the narrative in baseball will continue to be about suspicions rather than the play on the field.

Joining us now to talk about the league and its efforts is NPR's Mike Pesca. Good morning, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

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Sports
4:36 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Baseball Fans Divided Over Drug Suspensions

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:06 am

Major League Baseball has suspended 13 players for violating the league's drug policy. New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez was suspended for more than 200 games, until the end of next season.

Art & Design
4:02 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Art In Context: Venice Biennale Looks Past Pop Culture

The Angolan exhibit consists of tall stacks of large photographic posters by artist Edson Chagas. The country, which is exhibiting at Venice for the first time, won the Golden Lion award for best national pavilion.
Courtesy of www.beyondentrophy.com

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 10:56 am

Every two years for over a century, lovers of contemporary art convene in Venice for the oldest and largest noncommercial art exhibition in the world.

The Venice Biennale has none of the glitz and conspicuous consumption of art auctions in London and New York. Instead, it's a dizzying and eclectic array of sights by both celebrity artists and total unknowns.

This year's works are not just paintings, sculptures and installations, but also performances, videos and music.

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Business
4:02 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Study: Glass Ceiling True For Female White Collar Criminals

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:04 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Today's Last Word In Business is criminal glass ceiling. A new study suggests that female white collar crooks face the same barriers as their law-abiding counterparts in the corporate world.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A team of researchers from Penn State studied the involvement of women in recent corporate fraud cases. It found women held inferior positions in criminal conspiracies, and profited significantly less from their misdeeds.

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Business
4:02 am
Tue August 6, 2013

GM Looks To China To Boost Car Sales

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

General Motors is selling a lot of cars in China. The company set a sales record there in July.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports China is in the front line in the battle for automotive global dominance.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: In China this year, forecasters predict nearly 20 million cars will be sold. In the U.S., the bet is we'll sell about 15 and a half million.

Mike Wall is with IHS Automotive.

MILE WALL: Yeah, you really can't overstate the importance of China in the overall global automotive landscape.

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Around the Nation
2:49 am
Tue August 6, 2013

With Budgets Tight, Small Towns Go Without Courthouses

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:06 am

In the small town of Coalinga, Calif., on the corner of 6th and Elm streets, the Fresno County Superior Court's old courthouse is still. Inside, veteran police Lt. Darren Blevins gestures inside an empty courtroom.

"In the past, when we actually had court in here, over on this wall here was the seating for the inmates or the people that were held in custody," he says.

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Around the Nation
2:42 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Dredging South Carolina's Rivers For Long-Forgotten Timber

Louis Marcell and Adam Jones prepare to search for old logs, known as sinker wood, on the bottom of Ashley River near Charleston, S.C. They use sonar and a book of old train lines to find the timber, some of which has been preserved in the mud since the 1800s.
Noam Eshel

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 11:56 am

On the Ashley River, a few miles south of Charleston, S.C., the water is murky and the marsh grass high. A three-man logging crew is cruising on a 24-foot pontoon boat. It's low tide and logs are poking out everywhere.

Hewitt Emerson, owner of the Charleston-based reclaimed wood company Heartwood South, is in charge. He's going to an old saw mill site, but won't say exactly where. He's heading to Blackbeard's Creek, he says, as in pirate Blackbeard — the early 18th century scourge of the seas.

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Economy
2:30 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Ski Resorts Find Ways To Stay Busy When There's No Snow

In the summer, Snowmass ski resort in Colorado rents bikes instead of skis. It's an effort to create year-round revenue during a time when most ski resorts are closed.
Jeremy Swanson Aspen/Snowmass

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 9:50 am

With sizzling temperatures in much of the country, tourists are turning to mountain ski resorts to find relief. Resorts from Colorado to California and Oregon are on track to set a record this year for summer business.

Brandon Wilke is spending a long weekend at a resort just down the road from Aspen, Colo. He came for a wedding, but Wilke and his brother-in-law decided to bring their mountain bikes and try out some bike trails at the Snowmass ski resort. At first, Wilke says he didn't know mountain biking was an option.

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It's All Politics
2:29 am
Tue August 6, 2013

On The Road With Max And Dave: A Tax Overhaul Tour

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., (center) and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., (right) speak about overhauling the tax code at the 3M Innovation Center in Maplewood, Minn., on July 8.
Hannah Foslien AP

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 8:18 am

Ask Americans about the most pressing concerns for the nation, and overhauling the tax code probably isn't all that high on the list — that is, unless those Americans happen to be Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., and Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., the chairmen of the congressional tax-writing committees.

The two lawmakers are on a mission to simplify the tax code.

When they're out on the road selling that tax overhaul, they don't wear ties and they skip much of the formality of Washington — like last names even. Just call them Max and Dave.

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The Two-Way
1:38 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Court-Martial To Begin Tuesday In Fort Hood Shooting Rampage

Maj. Nidal Hasan faces 13 charges of murder and 32 of attempted murder for the November 2009 shootings at Fort Hood, Texas.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 9:59 am

Former Army psychiatrist Maj. Nidal Hasan is charged with opening fire in a troop processing center at Fort Hood, Texas, and killing 13 people and wounding more than 30 others in 2009.

Hasan is representing himself in the death penalty case.

NPR's Wade Goodwyn tells Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne that means Hasan will be questioning witnesses he is accused of shooting.

Hassan is paralyzed from the waist down after being shot by a military police officer during the rampage.

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Around the Nation
6:09 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Sideburns Contest To Honor Commodore Perry

Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry won a major victory over the British 200 years ago at the Battle of Lake Erie. On Wednesday the citizens of Erie, Pa., will honor him the best way they know how — with a sideburns contest. Judges are looking for sideburns that resemble Commodore Perry's famous mutton chops.

Around the Nation
6:05 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Preschooler To Serve Second Term As Mayor Of Minn. Town

The mayor of Dorset, Minn., is now four years old. Bobby Tufts' named was pulled out of a hat last year, making him mayor of the town of 20 people. Dorset doesn't have a formal government. On Sunday, his name was drawn again.

Books News & Features
5:59 am
Mon August 5, 2013

E-Books Strain Relations Between Libraries, Publishing Houses

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 1:23 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

E-books have strained the relations between libraries and the major publishing houses. Libraries say they're being cut out of the market because publishers are afraid they could lose money selling e-books to libraries. After much negotiation, the publishers are experimenting with new ways of doing business. But some libraries are already looking to bypass the high prices and restrictions that publishers place on e-books.

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Africa
5:23 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Why Gay Pride Celebrations In Uganda Were Discreet

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:44 pm

Gay pride celebrations are held loudly each summer in New York, Paris and Berlin. But when Uganda held its version of the event this weekend, it was done very privately. It came as the Ugandan parliament considers a piece of extremely anti-gay legislation, and as discrimination against gays is widespread

Around the Nation
5:07 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Donations Help Detroit Bury Unclaimed Bodies

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 9:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Sports
4:52 am
Mon August 5, 2013

A-Rod Said To Be Facing Long Suspension From Baseball

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Major League Baseball appears set to hand down suspensions to several players implicated in performance enhancing drug use. New York Yankees All-Star Alex Rodriguez is the biggest name by far on that list and he also faces the longest suspension. NPR's Mike Pesca joins us now for an update. Good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

MONTAGNE: So what length of penalty does Alex Rodriguez face?

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Television
4:10 am
Mon August 5, 2013

BBC Announces Peter Capaldi Is The Next Dr. Who

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:40 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

From space travel to travel through space and time...

(SOUNDBITE OF SOUND EFFECTS)

WERTHEIMER: Any fan of "Dr. Who" recognizes that sound. It's a whirling blue police call box, a tardis, transporting the main character on the long running BBC program. The plot line has the Doctor regenerating ever so often. Which means a new actor comes in to play the title role, and now the 50-year-old science fiction show has just named its 12th Doctor.

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Politics
4:10 am
Mon August 5, 2013

McConnell Squares Off With Rivals At Ky. Political Picnic

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:44 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Over the weekend the tiny town of Fancy Farm, Kentucky was the scene of a political brawl worthy of the Hatfields and McCoys. No one was run out of town, but Mitch O'Connell, the Senate Republican leader, who is asking Kentuckians for a sixth term, did get pretty roughed up - verbally. You'd hardly guess it all began as a church picnic.

NPR's David Welna was there.

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Analysis
4:10 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Washington Stresses Seriousness Of Terrorist Threat

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:29 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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Harvest Desk
2:27 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Ecologists Turn To Planned Grazing To Revive Grassland Soil

Fox Ranch, outside Yuma County, Colo., is a 14,000-acre nature preserve and working commercial cattle ranch. The ranch is used by the Nature Conservancy to put into practice its panned grazing technique.
Luke Runyon Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 3:24 pm

The world's soil is in trouble. Ecologists say without dramatic changes to how we manage land, vast swathes of grassland are at risk of turning into hard-packed desert. To make sure that doesn't happen, researchers are testing out innovative ways to keep moisture in the soil.

In eastern Colorado, one way could be in the plodding hooves of cattle.

Conventional wisdom tells you that if ranchland ground has less grass, the problem is too many cows. But that's not always the case. It depends on how you manage them, if you make sure they keep moving.

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Shots - Health News
2:25 am
Mon August 5, 2013

When Treating Abnormal Breast Cells, Sometimes Less Is More

Sally O'Neill decided to have a double mastectomy rather than "do a wait-and-see."
Richard Knox NPR

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 10:39 am

When Sally O'Neill's doctor told her she had an early form of cancer in one of her breasts, she didn't agonize about what she wanted to.

The 42-year-old mother of two young girls wanted a double mastectomy.

"I decided at that moment that I wanted them both taken off," says O'Neill, who lives in a suburb of Boston. "There wasn't a real lot of thought process to it. I always thought, 'If this happens to me, this is what I'm going to do.' Because I'm not taking any chances. I want the best possible outcome. I don't want to do a wait-and-see."

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:24 am
Mon August 5, 2013

To Join '63 March On Washington: 'Like Climbing A Mountain'

A newspaper clipping from The Cincinnati Herald on Sept. 14, 1963, included a picture of Jack Hansan and other members of the Cincinnati delegation.
Courtesy of Jack Hansan

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 8:49 am

For the Month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream Speech" on Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capitol from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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Economy
9:18 am
Fri August 2, 2013

162,000 Jobs Added In July; Unemployment Drops To 7.4 Percent

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 10:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the jobs report.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: The Labor Department says the U.S. economy added 162,000 new jobs last month. That's lower than many economists expected. Still the unemployment rate dropped to 7.4 percent. Workers did have fewer hours on the job and hourly earnings fell in July, for the first time since last fall. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:46 am
Fri August 2, 2013

D.C. Subway Baby Born At 'The Child' Station

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 10:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. As Shavonnte Taylor was riding the metro in D.C. yesterday, headed to a prenatal doctor's appointment. Her baby was due in a few weeks, but as she was changing trains her contractions began. Fellow metro riders, including luckily an EMT, sprang into action. And in a few minutes, right there on the platform, a healthy boy was born. Appropriately, that station is called L'Enfant Plaza. As in l'baby. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
4:35 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Colorado Restaurant Has A Furry New Regular

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 10:08 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

NPR Story
3:42 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Spoiler Alert: Spoilers May Not Be That Bad

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 12:09 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When you check social media and you're not caught up on your favorite TV show, say, you never know when you might encounter a spoiler. Somebody on Twitter, some blog says too much about what happened in a plot line. My big spoiler moment came when I saw a post about a death on "Downton Abbey" and I thought that everything was just ruined. But is it really that bad when this happens? NPR's Neda Ulaby has this encore story about how spoilers might actually make you enjoy something more.

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NPR Story
3:42 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Spanish Prime Minister Gets Grilled Over Bribery Claims

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 10:08 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In Spain, efforts at economic recovery are being overshadowed by a bribery scandal. Top politicians have been accused of taking under-the-table cash from construction companies. The ruling party's former treasurer is in jail. And yesterday, the prime minister had to explain himself in parliament. Lauren Frayer reports from Madrid.

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NPR Story
3:42 am
Fri August 2, 2013

How Do Young Zimbabweans Feel About Their Future?

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 10:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Zimbabweans remember well that 2008 presidential election, when many in the opposition were rounded up, tortured, and scores were killed. Ultimately Robert Mugabe stayed in power - 33 years now and counting. Fungai Machirori, who's 29 years old, is part of a generation that grew up under Mugabe. She's a poet and the founder of Her Zimbabwe, a not-very-political platform for women to share their stories.

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StoryCorps
2:18 am
Fri August 2, 2013

A Mother And Son Live, And Cope, With Mental Illness

Liza Long's son, 13, struggles with rage and violent outbursts. After the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., Long wrote a blog post advocating for better care for mentally ill youth.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 10:08 am

One day after the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., last December, Liza Long wrote a blog post urging the country to focus on treatment for the nation's mentally ill youth. In it, she shared the story of her own son, "Michael" (not his real name). "I live with a son who is mentally ill," she wrote for The Blue Review.

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The Salt
2:18 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Massachusetts Revives The Lost Art Of Making Sea Salt

The Martha's Vineyard beach where Heidi Feldman collects saltwater to make sea salt.
Courtesy of Heidi Feldman

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 10:08 am

"Look for a house, barn, paddock, barking dogs and screeching peacocks."

Those were Heidi Feldman's instructions to me to find Down Island Farm in Vineyard Haven on Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

She forgot to mention the ram, free roaming chickens and miniature horse. But I managed to find it anyway.

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