Morning Edition

4-9 weekday mornings.

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. 

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Business
4:42 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Why Modern Latinas Are A Challenge To Marketers

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Hispanic American are an increasingly important consumer demographic to woo. That's according to a new study from the market research firm Nielsen. The report says that most of today's Latinas are the primary decision makers when it comes to household spending.

But marketing to them is a real challenge, as NPR's Shereen Marisol Meraji reports.

SHEREEN MARISOL MERAJI, BYLINE: Welcome to the home of the contemporary Latina consumer.

PAMELA MARIA WRIGHT: Hi.

MERAJI: Hi. How are you?

Good. How are you?

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Law
4:42 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Holder Unveils New Approach To Criminal Justice

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And the Obama administration is trying to reduce prison time for some people convicted of less serious crimes. Attorney General Eric Holder outlined a new approach to criminal justice yesterday in a speech to the American Bar Association in San Francisco. He's targeting what he says is expensive and racially biased overcrowding in American prisons.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

ATTORNEY GENERAL ERIC HOLDER: Too many Americans go to too many prisons, for far too long, and for no truly good law enforcement reason.

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Shots - Health News
3:07 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Obamacare: People With Disabilities Face Complex Choices

Speech-language pathologists Jill Tullman (left) and Mendi Carroll (right) work with Bryce Vernon at Talking with Technology Camp in Empire, Colo., on July 25.
Kristen Kidd KCFR News

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

The Affordable Care Act has set new standards — called essential health benefits — outlining what health insurance companies must now cover. But there's a catch: Insurance firms can still pick and choose, to some degree, which specific therapies they'll cover within some categories of benefit.

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All Tech Considered
2:03 am
Tue August 13, 2013

A Closer Look At Elon Musk's Much-Hyped Hyperloop

A rendering of a Hyperloop pod.
Courtesy of Elon Musk

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

You can thank brainy billionaire Elon Musk's Hyperloop proposal for bringing electro-magnetic-powered transportation and the linear induction motor back into the public consciousness.

The Hyperloop is a system for really-really rapid transit. If built, Musk claims it can carry people about 800 miles per hour, which could get you from Los Angeles to San Francisco in about 30 minutes.

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The Salt
2:02 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Colorado Vault Is Fort Knox For The World's Seeds

Dave Dierig, research leader at the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation, stands among the ceiling-high shelves that hold the 600,000 seed packets in this cold storage vault.
Grace Hood KUNC

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

When unapproved genetically modified wheat was found growing in Oregon earlier this year, it didn't take long for accusations to start flying. A flurry of initial finger-pointing cast potential blame on a federal seed vault in Fort Collins, Colo., which housed the same strain of wheat, developed by Monsanto Corp., for about seven years up until late 2011.

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U.S.
2:01 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Of Bison, Birth Control And An Island Off Southern Calif.

Bison have been roaming the Santa Catalina Island since the 1920s. At one time they numbered more than 600.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

In an open-aired Jeep, it's a bone-jarring ride into Santa Catalina Island's vast interior. The dirt road winds and climbs, twists and turns, climbing 2,000 feet up.

From there, the deep blue of the Pacific Ocean comes back into view, and if you squint, you can see downtown Los Angeles 30 miles off on the horizon.

Some days, you can also see wild bison.

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The Record
11:03 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

The White Mandingos: Music That Defies Definition

The White Mandingos are, from left, Sacha Jenkins, Murs and Darryl Jenifer.
Courtesy of Biz 3 Publicity

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

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Europe
5:48 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Taxi Riders In Oslo Surprised By Who's Driving Them Around

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. It's a truism that people say what they really mean, talking politics with a cabby. This summer, some taxi riders in Oslo got a surprise when they discovered Norway's prime minister behind the wheel. It was part of his reelection campaign, recorded on a video just released. Besides politics, he got an earful on his not so great driving, prompting him to concede the country is better off with him in high office than driving a cab. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Games & Humor
5:45 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Artists Hope Aliens Have A Sense Of Humor

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:53 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

You know that feeling of relief when someone let's you borrow their phone charger? Well, a couple artists think that sense of emotion could save us. They helped design a new satellite to look like a giant gadget charger. There's an inscription: Greetings Beleaguered Space Traveler. Welcome to the Universe's First Celestial Charging Station. One designer said he hopes this will make invaders stop and say: These guys are nice - we're not going to destroy their planet.

Around the Nation
4:21 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Heavy Rotation: Lluvia Con Sol Is A Hit At WEXT

Each month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities at member stations across the country to tell us about a song they can't get enough of. At member station WEXT, Ernesto Lechner is the co-host of the weekly music program, The Latin Alternative. His choice for August's installment of "Heavy Rotation" is "Lluvia Con Sol" by Orquesta el Macabeo.

NPR Story
4:09 am
Mon August 12, 2013

'One Night In Miami', More Than Clay Beats Liston

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:53 am

Transcript

RENE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We're going to hear now about a play on stage here in Los Angeles, though it's set in another hot city, it's called "One Night In Miami," and it's based on a real event. On February 25th, 1964, the young Cassius Clay defeated world heavyweight champion Sonny Liston. Clay, who would soon change his name to Muhammad Ali, celebrated his victory in a small hotel room with three of the most prominent African-Americans of the time.

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NPR Story
4:09 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Wildfires Destroyed 'Big Chunks Of My Childhood'

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:53 am

Wildfires are raging across the West. Colorado resident and Morning Edition commentator Craig Childs, a veteran of many fires, describes the long-term damage to the landscape. Child's latest book is Apocalypse Planet: Field Guide to the Future of the Earth.

NPR Story
4:09 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Dufner Wins PGA Championship Over Furyk

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:53 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Jason Dufner has won this year's PGA championship. The 36-year-old is known for, shall we say, his nonchalance, but he managed a double fist pump after clenching the victory. There are a few more tournaments left this year but this was the last major. And NPR's Mike Pesca is with us to talk about the year in golf. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

GREENE: So let's start with this weekend's tournament. How did Jason Dufner pull this off?

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The Salt
2:09 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Food Delivery Hits The Web, But Restaurants Pay The Price

A Seamless sticker is displayed next to the menu in the window of a restaurant in New York's Times Square on Saturday. Rivals Seamless and GrubHub said Friday that they have completed their combination, creating an online takeout company covering about 25,000 restaurants in 500 cities.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:56 am

Two big restaurant delivery websites — Grubhub and Seamless — have announced a merger. Together, they'll allow diners in 500 cities the convenience of ordering from thousands of restaurants with just a few clicks on their computer. For restaurants, the costs of being on these websites can be hard to swallow.

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Parallels
2:08 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Too Much, Too Fast: China Sees Backlash From Massive Growth

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 10:25 am

At a time when much of the world is mired in economic torpor, China still enjoys enviable growth rates. Yet there's no question that its economy is growing more slowly these days.

Just ask Yan Liwei, a salesman for a construction materials company, who was visiting a park in Shanghai this weekend.

"The number of new construction projects is declining somewhat. It's taking longer for many of our clients to pay us what they owe," Liwei says. "Many small and midsized developers are feeling a cash crunch."

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Shots - Health News
2:07 am
Mon August 12, 2013

New Muscle Drugs Could Be The Next Big Thing In Sports Doping

Belgian Blue bulls look like they are made of muscle because they have a mutation in the gene that codes for the protein myostatin. In humans, as in other types of cattle, myostatin normally limits the number of muscle fibers that form before birth and then limits the growth of those fibers later on.
Courtesy of Se-Jin Lee and Alexandra McPherron PNAS

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 10:03 am

Research intended to help people with muscle-wasting diseases could be about to launch a new era in performance-enhancing drugs.

The research has produced several muscle-building drugs now being tested in people with medical problems, including muscular dystrophy, cancer and kidney disease. The drugs all work by blocking a substance called myostatin that the body normally produces to keep muscles from getting too big.

Read more
Business
9:28 am
Fri August 9, 2013

UBS To Pay $120 Million In Lehman Brothers Dispute

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with more fallout from the financial crisis.

Swiss banking giant UBS has agreed to pay $120 million to settle a lawsuit by investors. The case goes back to 2007. Investors say they were misled about the health of the financial firm Lehmann Brothers when UBS was selling them investments linked to Lehmann's debt. Lehmann collapsed into bankruptcy in September 2008. The settlement resolves claims of about $1 billion. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:47 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Kansas City Sandwich Is A 'Hit' With Baseball Teams

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Oklahoma Joe's barbecue is a popular spot in Kansas City - especially known for its Z-Man sandwich - smoked brisket with provolone topped with onion rings. The Minnesota Twins must've gotten the memo. They ordered 50 Z-Mans on Tuesday, and went on to beat the hometown Royals in a blowout.

Around the Nation
5:38 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Michigan Family Welcomes 12th Child

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer, with an announcement. Michiganders Jay and Teri Schwandt just had their 12th child, and it's a boy, just like his 11 brothers. Little Tucker was nine days late, so they thought he might be a girl - not happening.

Must be a family thing. Teri's sister has 10 children, and they are all boys. Will they try again for lucky 13? We will never close that door, says Teri.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Digital Life
4:22 am
Fri August 9, 2013

New Digital Amber Alerts Could Create A Backlash

Amber Alerts were issued as cellphone text messages in California this week.
NPR

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:20 pm

A couple of nights ago I had just closed my book, turned off my light, and was drifting off to sleep when my cellphone started to shriek. I shot awake and groped for the phone. My sleep-befuddled brain was greeted with this message: "Boulevard, CA Amber Alert update." Then there was a license plate number, and a make and model of the car.

Groggily, I Google this town — Boulevard, Calif. — and discovered it was 541 miles away from my house. That's more than the distance between Washington, D.C., and Detroit. I was mystified. Why was I getting this?

Read more
NPR Story
3:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Astronaut Among Presidential Medal Of Freedom Winners

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Astronaut Sally Ride has served as a role model for many young women as the first American woman in space. That's one of the reasons why she's one of the 16 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Ride is being honored posthumously - she died last year at the age of 61. The White House in a statement said: Sally Ride stood up for racial and gender equality in the classroom and taught students that there are no limits to what they can accomplish.

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NPR Story
3:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Feds Probe If Student Athletes Were Biogenesis Clients

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Major League baseball, this week, sanctioned a number of players, including New York Yankee Alex Rodriguez. They're accused of receiving performance enhancing drugs from a Miami clinic called Biogenesis.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And according to ESPN and other organizations, that clinic also saw high school athletes. Parents have told the sports network they don't know why their children were listed in the clinics records. The lawyer for the owner of Biogenesis declined to comment to ESPN and has not returned calls from NPR.

Read more
NPR Story
3:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Lawlessness Increases In Libya

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And just preserving some semblance of order is the big challenge in neighboring Libya. That country's long-time dictator, Muammar Gaddafi was toppled from power two years ago and now the future of Libya as even a functioning state is in question. There has been increased lawlessness in that country. The militias that ousted Muammar Gaddafi are fighting with each other. A thousand inmates escaped in a prison break and there are assassinations of activists and police.

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Parallels
2:08 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Unease In Sprawling Rio Slum Ahead Of Police 'Pacification'

A police officer patrols the rooftop of a school at the Rocinha slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sept. 20, 2012, where a "pacification" anti-crime effort was underway. Rio police are now going to attempt a similar pacification in another huge slum, Mare.
Silvia Izquierdo AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Brazilian police are preparing to occupy one of the deadliest shantytown complexes in Rio de Janeiro, hoping to drive out drug gangs ahead of next year's World Cup and the 2016 Olympics.

It's the latest "pacification" effort in a Rio slum, and the city's new chief of police says he'll need some 1,500 cops to secure this one, called Mare.

Police in the past would typically stage raids, but then withdraw from the dangerous shantytowns, known here as favelas. But under the pacification program, they now set up shop inside the favelas.

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Planet Money
2:07 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Tourre Juror: 'We Saw Goldman As The Bigger Problem'

Fabrice Tourre, outside the courtroom. "We didn't feel any malice toward him," one of the jurors said.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Beth Glover was a juror on the trial of former Goldman Sachs trader Fabrice Tourre. When the lawyers were discussing the mortgages tied to the securities at the center of the case, Glover realized that, for all intents and purposes, they were talking about her mortgage.

"When they were looking at the subprime mortgage groupings, I think I would have been in one of those," Glover told me. "I didn't have as great as FICO score at that time."

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The Salt
2:05 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Old Hawaiian Menus Tell Story Of Local Fish And Their Demise

Colorful covers of menus from the Royal Hawaiian Hotel (left) and the Monarch Room Royal Hawaiian Hotel.
New York Public Library

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 2:53 pm

In the early to mid-1900s, the islands of Hawaii were a far-away, exotic destination. People who managed to get there often kept mementos of that journey including kitschy menus from Hawaiian fine dining restaurants and hotels like like Trader Vic's and Prince Kuhio's.

Now these old menus are serving a purpose beyond colorful relics from the past. Kyle Van Houtan, an ecologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, says he's found a scientific purpose for the menus.

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StoryCorps
12:17 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Surviving Tragedy: 'It Brought Us Closer'

Ondelee at home before his prom. In Chicago, prom night is a big deal. Fifty percent of African-American Chicago high school students end up dropping out of high school before senior year. Ondelee graduated from Wendell Phillips Academy High School in Chicago on June 15, and is planning to attend college.
Carlos Javier Ortiz Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

One night in 2009, Ondelee Perteet and a friend went to a party in his hometown of Chicago.

"A lot of people, they started throwing gang signs. And, you know, I got into an argument with somebody in the party, and that's when I got shot in the face," Ondelee said during a recent visit to StoryCorps with his mother, Detreena.

He was 14.

"I got to the hospital, and the doctor came back, and he said, 'We're sorry, but he's never going to move his arms and legs again,' " said Detreena, 47. "It just tore me apart."

Read more
Around the Nation
5:54 am
Thu August 8, 2013

Republicans And Democrats Get Behind 'Voices For Yes'

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Republicans and Democrats agree. Strategists who worked on opposing campaigns are urging the Twitterverse to just say yes to the candidacy of the progressive rock band, Yes. Plus, a Facebook page, a website, a documentary, all to get the Rock 'n' roll Hall of Fame to say yes to Yes. Is our national polarization at an end? Or perhaps "The Gates of Delirium" have opened.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Europe
5:53 am
Thu August 8, 2013

'Magic Flute' Singers End Up In Lake Constance

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. In Mozart's opera "The Magic Flute," Tamino and Pamina can't get married unless brave Tamino passes three tests or trials. At a performance on Lake Constance in Austria this week, the trials by silence and fire were no sweat but water turned out to be a bit trickier. As a gondola carrying three characters approached the floating stage it capsized, tossing the three into the lake's shallow waters. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
3:27 am
Thu August 8, 2013

Former Soviet Republic's Democratic Transition Questioned

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:45 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It was five years ago that the U.S. was chastising Russia over its invasion of the former Soviet Republic of Georgia. Russian tanks had moved across the border after Georgian forces tried to re-take a separatist region, a region which Russia backed. There is still tensions between the countries, but last year Georgian voters elected a new prime minister who pledged to improve ties with Moscow.

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