Morning Edition

4-9 weekday mornings.

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. 

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Pages

Business
3:02 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Commissions From Managed-Futures Market Can Wipe Out Profits

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 10:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's hear, next, about investors who try to diversify their portfolios but may have only enriched their advisers. Some brokers and firms have been encouraging customers to invest in managed futures. Those are basically investments in futures contracts, such as gold, or global currencies or pork bellies. They are sold as a way to minimize risk.

David Evans of Bloomberg says, in reality, they've been a bad deal.

Read more
StoryCorps
1:59 am
Fri October 11, 2013

A Grandmother, Her Grandson And Fitting In — Together

Barbara Handelsman, 80, and her grandson Aaron Handelsman, 20 — birds of a feather.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 10:52 am

Growing up, Barbara Handelsman often felt out of step with her family.

"When I was really little, I thought my sister always had all the power because she was pudgy and cute, where I had all elbows and knees," Barbara says. "I was so shy. I had no idea how to be the popular kid, and so I felt incompetent when it came to trying to be an A+ anything."

Read more
Around the Nation
1:58 am
Fri October 11, 2013

The Shutdown News Isn't All Bad For A Few American Indian Tribes

Mariluisa and Andrea Caricchia traveled 6,000 miles from Italy to spend their honeymoon at the Grand Canyon. Instead, they are exploring tribal land.
Laurel Morales KJZZ

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 10:16 am

Grand Canyon National Park is closed for the government shutdown, but tourists determined to see it can take in views from reservation land. The Hualapai Tribe owns Grand Canyon West, where visitors can venture onto a Plexiglas horseshoe walkway that stretches out over the chasm below.

On the east side of the Grand Canyon, visitors are flocking to the Navajo Nation, where Nita Rodriguez gives a tour.

Read more
All Tech Considered
1:57 am
Fri October 11, 2013

3-D Printing A Masterwork For Your Living Room

Cosmo Wenman generated this 3-D model of the Ares Borghese, based on hundreds of photos, from the Basel Sculpture Hall. Wenman publishes the scans online, so that anyone can use them to 3-D print a replica of the masterpiece.
Courtesy of Cosmo Wenman

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:22 am

You may never be able to get to Italy to see Michelangelo's David — but advances in 3-D printing technology are making it possible for you to create an almost perfect replica.

It's an idea that Cosmo Wenman is hoping will catch on. He's pushing the edges of how 3-D printing can be used to make classic works accessible.

I followed Wenman on an excursion to the Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University. These days, a lot of museums let people take photos of art, and Wenman takes a lot of them.

Read more
The Government Shutdown
10:12 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Boehner Proposes 6-Week Increase In Debt Limit

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

Seven days from now - according to the U.S. Treasury Department - the U.S. approaches the point where it can no longer pay its bills. The federal budget deficit has been dropping dramatically. But in the wake of the Great Recession, it is still very high.

Read more
Books News & Features
6:39 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Canadian Alice Munro Wins Nobel's Literature Prize

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Swedish Academy, which gives Nobel Prizes out this time of year, calls for master of the contemporary short story. Canadian writer Alice Munro is the winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature. The announcement was made earlier this morning in Stockholm. And joining us to talk about the selection is NPR's Lynn Neary. Lynn, good morning

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Good morning. Good to be here.

GREENE: So we have an editor at MORNING EDITION from Canada, and he literally jumped out of his seat when he heard this news.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:18 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Colorado Ethics Watch To Get To The Bottom of Free Pot

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:13 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Hawaiian Company Adds Spam Flavored Macadamia Nuts

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Spam brings two things to mind: unwanted email or that gelatinous pre-cooked meat product you find at the store. Well, some people would rather see both in the trash. But many people like eating Spam and now there's a new way to do it. The Hamakua Macadamia Nut Company has a new flavor: Spam. The flavoring is meat free. Good news for any Spam-loving vegetarians who might be out there. The president of the Hawaii company, Richard Schnitzler, said Spam has a cult following in his state.

Politics
3:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

10 Days Into Shutdown, 'We've Got To Do Better Than This'

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the partial shutdown prompted angry debate across the country. But at the center of that debate, we found quiet yesterday. We dropped by a Senate office building where the halls were empty. Papers taped on doors read: We regret that due to the government shutdown our office is closed. *

Read more
Around the Nation
3:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Texas Couple Props Up Head Start While Government Is Closed

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And a similar offer of money has propped up some Head Start programs. Laura and John Arnold, of Houston, Texas, pledged up to $10 million to keep the program running in six states.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Head Start is a preschool program for kids from low-income families. And on Friday, it closed down in many places when the government partially stopped. This is how the parent of a Head Start child, Laura Bastion, heard the news.

Read more
National Security
3:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Foundation To Pay Military Death Benefits During Shutdown

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Thursday, this is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The remains of four American service members were returned yesterday to Dover Air Force Base. They were killed in Afghanistan.

Read more
Planet Money
2:00 am
Thu October 10, 2013

What A U.S. Default Would Mean For Pensions, China And Social Security

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:38 am

What would happen if Congress doesn't raise the debt ceiling and the U.S. defaults on its debt later this month? The broad economic implications are unpredictable, but a default could cause huge trouble for the global economy.

But whatever happens to the global economy, one thing is clear: People all over the world who have loaned the U.S. government money won't get paid on time.

Read more
Arts & Life
1:58 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: On Heroism

Daily Beast Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown
Victoria Will The Daily Beast

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Tina Brown, editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast, joins NPR's Steve Inskeep again for a recurring feature Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth. This month her suggestions are all about heroes — whether being heroic means doing something, or not doing something.

Revisiting Black Hawk Down

Read more
Environment
1:56 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Whatever Happened To The Deal To Save The Everglades?

Mechanical harvesters cut sugar cane on U.S. Sugar Corp. land in Clewiston, Fla., in 2008, the same year the state struck a deal to buy most of the company's Everglades holdings.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 10:49 am

South of Florida's Lake Okeechobee, hundreds of thousands of acres of sugar cane thrive in the heart of one of the world's largest wetlands. The Everglades stretches from the tip of the peninsula to central Florida, north of Lake Okeechobee.

"The Everglades actually begins at Shingle Creek, outside of Orlando," says Jonathan Ullman of the Sierra Club.

That's nearly 200 miles north of the agricultural land that Ullman and other environmentalists say is crucial to state and federal efforts to restore the wetlands area to a healthy ecosystem.

Read more
The Record
11:03 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Mala Rodriguez And The Women Of Latin Hip-Hop

Mala Rodriguez on stage at the Mulafest Festival in Madrid in June.
Pedro Armestre AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:52 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Why Scientists Held Back Details On A Unique Botulinum Toxin

The botulism toxin comes from Clostridium botulinum bacteria, seen here in a colorized micrograph.
James Cavallini Science Source

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:51 pm

Scientists have discovered the first new form of botulinum toxin in over 40 years, but they're taking the unusual step of keeping key details about it secret.

That's because botulinum toxin is one of the most poisonous substances known. It causes botulism, and the newly identified form of it can't be neutralized by any available treatment.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:28 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Chicago Company Aims To Popularize Electric Unicycle

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:17 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Starbucks Offers A Free Cup Of Coffee With A Condition

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with shutdown beverage news. New breweries cannot open. The partial government shutdown prevents the Treasury Department from approving them. You can still get coffee at Starbucks. CEO Howard Shultz, who spoke up for gun rights - then had to ask people to stop bringing guns to his stores - waded into politics again. He's urging people to talk to one another, offering free coffee if you buy someone a coffee - subsidized Starbucks conversation.

Research News
3:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

3 Scientists Share 2013 Nobel Prize For Chemistry

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry will be shared by three scientists who took chemistry inside the world of computing. This powerful technology is now used to develop drugs and perform all sorts of vital tasks in chemistry. The three winners were all born overseas but collaborated in the United States and elsewhere in the 1970s, where they started their work.

Read more
Politics
3:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Federal Prison Workers Dismayed By Government Shutdown

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:38 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
Politics
3:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Rep. Labrador Of Idaho Weighs In On Government Shutdown

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
Parallels
2:00 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Bound By Blood, Divided By Politics: Three Egyptian Sisters

Egyptian women queue outside a polling station during voting on a disputed constitution drafted by Islamist supporters of then-President Mohammed Morsi, in Giza, Egypt, last December. In a country divided by a political crisis, families are not spared.
Nasser Nasser AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 7:44 pm

Nagwa, Dina and May are sisters. All three are married, all three have children. All three had always been close — until now.

Egypt's political crisis is changing those relationships. Nagwa and May sympathize with the Muslim Brotherhood. Dina, on the other hand, supports the military, arguing that the generals are just keeping extremists at bay.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:00 am
Wed October 9, 2013

High-End Extras Aren't A Sure Bet For Tribal Casinos

Yvonne Smith is the director of La Rive Spa at Northern Quest Resort and Casino in Washington state. Across the country, Native American tribes are hoping high-end extras will draw visitors to casinos.
Jessica Robinson Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 8:53 am

What used to be no-frills slot parlors off the highway are turning into resort-style destinations with spas, golf courses and luxury hotels. Native American tribes are hoping these added amenities will give them an edge in an increasingly competitive gaming market.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:58 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Booker Gets A Run For His Money In N.J. Senate Race

Democrat Cory Booker (left) and Republican Steve Lonegan stand together after their first debate in the race for U.S. Senate on Oct. 4 in Trenton, N.J.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 8:22 am

Cory Booker, the celebrity mayor of Newark, N.J., was expected to cruise to victory in the special election to fill the U.S. Senate seat of the late Frank Lautenberg. But just a week before voters go to the polls, he's facing a surprisingly strong challenge from Tea Party favorite Steve Lonegan.

The race was supposed to be a mismatch: Booker, the Democrat, and his 1.4 million Twitter followers versus the Republican former mayor of Bogota, N.J. — population 8,000.

But no one told Lonegan.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:27 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Shutdown Forces Antarctic Research Into 'Caretaker Status'

The Chalet (right) is the U.S. Antarctic Program's administrations and operations center at McMurdo Station.
Reed Scherer National Science Foundation

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:44 am

Earlier this week we told you that scientists who do research in Antarctica have been on pins and needles, worried that the government shutdown would effectively cancel all of their planned field work this year.

Well, those scientists just got the news they didn't want to hear.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

NFL Jaguars, Broncos Have Interesting Point Spread

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:26 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. If you bet on the Jacksonville Jaguars this weekend, your team could be crushed and you could still win. The Jaguars are 0-5. They play Peyton Manning's undefeated Denver Broncos. The Broncos are 28-point favorites, the biggest point spread in NFL history. The Jaguars could lose by 27, you'd still win your bet. But gamble with care. In their big win against Dallas last weekend, Denver did not cover the spread. It is MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:26 am
Tue October 8, 2013

No Bones About It, Shutdown Traps T. Rex In Storage Facility

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:26 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

It may have been a fearsome predator in its day, but even Tyrannosaurus rex could not escape the government shutdown. A T. rex skeleton, one of the most complete in existence, was headed to the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum this week to star in the National Fossil Day festivities. But with the museum closed, the tyrant lizard will continue to reign supreme at a storage facility in Montana, coming to Washington next spring

Law
3:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Jury Selection To Begin For Trial Of Madoff Employees

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:26 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Nearly five years after Bernie Madoff was arrested for fraud, some of his former employees are about to go on trial in New York. The trial is expected to focus on how much the employees knew about Madoff's multibillion dollar Ponzi scheme. Jury selections gets under way today.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

Read more
Sports
3:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

WNBA's All-Time Top Scorer Tina Thompson Retires

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We're going to hear next from a woman who has finished one of the most extraordinary careers in recent sports history. Tina Thompson, of pro basketball Seattle Storm, has retired. She played in every one of the WNBA's 17 seasons. The all-time top scorer, she won four championships, two Olympic gold medals. But she never dreamed of becoming a pro basketball player. That option once hardly existed for women.

Read more
Animals
3:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

The Truth About Lemmings, The Rodent, Not The Political Animal

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now we have this note as we continue America's most comprehensive coverage of the government shutdown. We have this morning, a scientific clarification about lemmings. Last week, you may recall a Republican lawmaker called his colleagues lemmings. He meant his fellow Republicans were following Senator Ted Cruz on a disastrous mission that led to the government shutdown.

Lemmings supposedly follow each other over a cliff. But we have learned - NPR has learned - that lemming mass suicide is a myth.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more

Pages