Morning Edition

4-9 weekday mornings.

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. 

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Pages

Around the Nation
4:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Researchers Use Genetic History To Answer Mutation Questions

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In the American Southwest, a rare genetic disorder known as the Common Hispanic Mutation has haunted those of Spanish descent for nearly 400 years. It's been called "El Frio," or the cold. Now, to understand the disease, researchers in New Mexico are digging into the genetic history of residents. From member station KUNM in Albuquerque, Tristan Ahtone reports.

Read more
History
4:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

English Debate What To Do With Richard III's Remains

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:49 am

More than 500 years after the Wars of the Roses, the English are again fighting over Richard the Third. Archaeologists from the University of Leicester last year unearthed his remains under a parking lot in the city. Leicester Cathedral has earmarked more than a million pounds to give him a proper burial. But not so fast say the people of York.

Environment
1:57 am
Tue August 20, 2013

How Extreme Australian Rains Made Global Sea Levels Drop

Heavy rains in Australia in 2010 and 2011 flooded farmland and homes, like these in the Queensland state town of St. George, seen here on Feb. 7. 2011.
Sally Nicol Rigney AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 8:19 am

Global sea level has been rising as a result of global warming, but in 2010 and 2011, sea level actually fell by about a quarter of an inch.

Scientists now say they know why: It has to do with extreme weather in Australia.

The sea level drop coincided with some of the worst flooding in that continent's history. Dozens of people died and torrents washed away houses and cars, forcing thousands from their homes.

Read more
U.S.
1:56 am
Tue August 20, 2013

One By One, California Agents Track Down Illegally Owned Guns

Firearms seized during a sweep by the Los Angeles Police Department using the California's Armed Prohibited Persons System initiative. The program uses a database to identify gun owners who are no longer allowed to possess a firearm.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 7:57 am

In California, officials are ramping up a unique program that identifies and seizes guns from people who are prohibited from keeping them. Under state law, a legally registered gun owner loses the right to own a firearm when he or she is convicted of a crime or becomes mentally ill.

Read more
Music News
1:03 am
Tue August 20, 2013

How To Win That Music Competition? Send A Video

If someone like Lang Lang were starting out now, the energetic concert pianist could nail every piano competition without the judges ever hearing a note, according to a new study.
China Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 4:13 am

Chia-Jung Tsay was something of a piano prodigy. By age 12, she was performing Mendelssohn in concert. At 16, she made her debut at Carnegie Hall. Soon, she was on her way to some of the best music schools in the country — Juilliard and the Peabody Conservatory. And she was throwing her hat in the ring for different competitions.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:52 am
Mon August 19, 2013

What Do You Do When Your Cable TV Goes Out?

Here's one thing not to do: call 911. Police in Fairfield, Conn., had to remind residents Sunday night that a cable drop-out is not "an emergency or a police-related concern." They added that misusing the 911 system can result in arrest.

Around the Nation
5:52 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Redheads Flock To Portland For World Record Attempt

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:27 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Redheads usually stand out in a crowd, though not at the Portland Redhead Event. More than 1,300 gathered in Portland, Ore., over the weekend - which it hopes is a new world record.

To qualify, participants had to produce pictures of their younger selves and their naturally red hair. If confirmed, this would be Portland's third record this summer. The others? The largest gathering of people hugging trees and the longest floating human chain.

Business
3:52 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Consider Wedding Insurance To Get Hitched Without A Hitch

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:52 am

The average cost of an American wedding cost more than $28,000 last year. Travelers insurance is now offering wedding insurance. There's coverage for failed wedding pictures, the caterer goes out of business, gifts go missing, etc.

NPR Story
3:38 am
Mon August 19, 2013

U.S. Family Of Ill Prisoner Wants North Korea To Release Him

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
3:38 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Democrats And Republicans Push Obama To Get Tough With Egypt

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

After a weeklong vacation, President Obama is back at the White House, though not for long. He's getting ready for a bus tour later in the week to promote his policies on the economy and education. The president is also dealing with demands from both political parties that he get tougher with the Egyptian military, as violence rages in Egypt.

Read more
All Tech Considered
2:28 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Hitting The Road Without A Driver

Carnegie Mellon's autonomous car, developed with General Motors, is by all appearances a normal Cadillac SRX crossover — except for the big red button in the middle of the dashboard. In an emergency, the button allows the car to be switched immediately back to standard driving mode.
GM-Carnegie Mellon Autonomous Driving Collaborative Research Lab

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:19 pm

The cars we drive have gotten ever more sophisticated. They can just about park themselves; they tell us if we're drifting out of our lane; they can prevent skids. Some even automatically apply the brakes if they sense that a collision is imminent.

Engineers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh are developing a car that can do all of those things and more — it can actually drive itself. Imagine that commute to work.

Read more
Books
2:07 am
Mon August 19, 2013

For You To Borrow, Some Libraries Have To Go Begging

The Tyson Library in Ludlow, Vt., is required to support itself independently; public libraries in Vermont receive no state funding.
Neda Ulaby NPR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:14 pm

More than 90 percent of Americans say public libraries are important to their communities, according to the Pew Research Center. But the way that love translates into actual financial support varies hugely from state to state.

Vermont, for instance, brags that it has more libraries per capita than any other U.S. state. Some of them are remarkably quaint. In Ludlow, one library is a white clapboard Victorian, slightly frayed, ringed by lilies and sitting by the side of a brook.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:06 am
Mon August 19, 2013

You Ask, We Answer: More Of Your Questions About The Affordable Care Act

From left, Garrett Berntsen, Jennifer Majer and William Shields compare notes at The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. Twenty-somethings have new choices under Obamacare.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 10:06 am

The Oct. 1 launch of the new health insurance exchanges is now less than two months away, and people are starting to pay attention to the changes these new marketplaces may bring to the nation's health care system.

Read more
Code Switch
2:05 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Not Just A 'Black Thing': An Asian-American's Bond With Malcolm X

Kochiyama looks at a memorial for World War II Japanese-American internees at the Rohwer Relocation Center in Rohwer, Ark., in 2004.
Mike Wintroath AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 11:55 am

The brief friendship of Malcolm X and Yuri Kochiyama began close to 50 years ago with a handshake.

Diane Fujino, chairwoman of the Asian-American studies department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, details the moment in her biography Heartbeat of Struggle: The Revolutionary Life of Yuri Kochiyama.

Kochiyama and her eldest son, 16-year-old Billy, were arrested along with hundreds of other people, mainly African-Americans, during a protest in Brooklyn, N.Y., in October 1963.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:29 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Has Voyager 1 Left The Solar System?

This artist rendering provided by NASA shows Voyager 1 at the edge of the solar system.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:52 pm

The Voyager 1 spacecraft launched in 1977 on a mission to Jupiter and Saturn. It kept on going. Today it's billions of miles from Earth, and scientists have been predicting it will soon leave the solar system.

NPR has been on Voyager watch since at least 2003, when longtime science correspondent Richard Harris provided this warning of Voyager's impending departure.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:22 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Not So Unusual: Bat Found At Atlanta's Turner Field

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. When I go to the ballgame I expect to see a lot of bats, and usually a couple of bat boys and even those bat boys carrying bats. Well, at Atlanta's Turner Field this week there was a strange bat next to the pitcher's mound. It was moving and flapping its wings.

Animals
6:18 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Chinese Zoo Substitutes Dog For Lion

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Zoos are great for teaching kids about the different sounds that animals make. Monkeys go ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh-oh-ah, horses go nay, and lions go woof. Wait. What? A mother, taking her son around a zoo in China, thought her boy was mistaken when he pointed out the barking lion. He was right. The zoo had taken their African lion away for breeding, and subbed in an employee's large, hairy dog. The mom felt cheated.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Race
4:29 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Chinatown's 'White Devil John' Sentenced To 20 Years

John Willis, also known as "White Devil John" in Cantonese, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for money laundering and drug charges.
Jane Collins for NPR

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:29 pm

The conviction this week of mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger put an end to one of Boston's highest-profile crime sagas.

Less well-known, though, is the case of John Willis, a white man from Dorchester, Mass., who was sentenced in federal court on Thursday to 20 years in prison for drug trafficking and money laundering.

Read more
Business
4:27 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Ford Lowers Mileage Rating On C-Max Hybrid

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an EPA crackdown.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Ford Motor Company will reduce the fuel economy sticker on its new C-Max hybrid to 43 miles per gallon, down from its earlier estimate of 47.

As Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports, the change has generated a new review of fuel economy testing standards.

Read more
Africa
4:27 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Doctors Without Borders To Pull Out Of Somalia

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Somalia is a country that has long been plagued by horrific violence, where even humanitarian groups are targeted. Just a month ago, two workers from Doctors Without Borders were released after 21 months in captivity. The group has had 16 staff killed in their 22 years operating in Somalia. Well, now Doctors Without Borders says it has had enough. For just the second time in its history, the group is completely pulling out of a country because of safety concerns.

Read more
Food
1:57 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Demystifying Saffron: Mark Bittman Explains The Pricey Spice

Marilyn Barbone iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 3:25 pm

In the latest installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, New York Times columnist and cookbook author Mark Bittman sheds a little light on saffron — a spice that has been stumping Lennet Radke in Wisconsin. Radke, who received a little jar in a contest, says she's never really used it. The stuff isn't cheap. And that knowledge alone can stifle experimentation.

Read more
StoryCorps
1:56 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Riding Choppers And Harleys To Protect Kids In Need

Happy Dodson (left) and Taz Roman are president and treasurer, respectively, of the Connecticut chapter of Bikers Against Child Abuse.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:36 am

Happy Dodson and Taz Roman are bikers. Not cyclists, but the leather jacket and chained wallet kind of bikers. They're also members of a group called Bikers Against Child Abuse.

The nonprofit, with chapters across the U.S. and in some parts of Europe, accepts referrals from parents, guardians, police, social workers and other agencies. Whenever those kids don't feel safe, they can call Happy, Taz and their other biker friends, who come straight to the child's house.

Read more
All Tech Considered
1:55 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Herzog Plumbs Guilt And Loss Wrought By Texting And Driving

Reggie Shaw killed two men while he was texting on a Utah highway. He now speaks to groups about the dangers of texting and driving.
ShareATT YouTube

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 3:31 pm

Read more
Animals
1:53 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Wild Horses Run Free As Adoption Centers Fill Up

Katrina Boydon and her mustang Spirit. She adopted the horse as an orphaned foal with a rattlesnake bite on his hoof.
Will Stone KUNR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:52 am

Drive about 20 miles north of Reno, Nev., into the barren scrubland and you're sure to see "wild" horses — more than 1,000, in fact. Just not in the wild.

Laura Leigh calls several mares to the edge of the dusty corral. She's a regular at Palomino Valley National Adoption Center. The horses eagerly rub their muzzles against her, their coats hot from the midday sun.

"We got to get you a home, don't we?" she says to one of the horses. "This one will let you scratch her withers and put your hands on her legs. You're adorable, aren't you?"

Read more
The Salt
1:52 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Why This Year's Blueberry Bounty Has Growers Feeling Blue

Picker Erika Nicolas Garcia, 18, fills her pail at a blueberry farm near Hillsboro, Ore.
Anna King Northwest Public Radio

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 9:52 am

The blueberries on your morning cereal are less expensive this year. That's because farmers are harvesting a bumper crop this summer. It's good news for berry lovers, but the bounty might wreck some blueberry growers.

In Richland, Wash., Genoa Blankenship pops open the lid on a box of blueberries. Her three young children struggle to stop wiggling. Blankenship loves the idea of healthy snacks that are easy to take along to soccer practice.

Read more
Middle East
10:40 am
Thu August 15, 2013

U.S. Cancels Military Exercise With Egypt Amid Crackdown

President Obama announced the cancellation of a joint military exercise with Egypt in the wake of that country's military government crackdown on protesters. At least 500 were killed in those skirmishes, including 40 police. For more, David Greene speaks with NPR's Scott Horsley.

Around the Nation
5:58 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Word Usage Heats Up Internet, 'Literally'

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. The Internet is literally on fire this morning over the usage of a word. Traditionally literally means something that is strictly true. Google's dictionary, bloggers just noticed, says you can also use that word for emphasis. Like I would literally give my right arm to own a pickup truck. That's true. Grammar sticklers claim Google has sided with language traitors and broken the English language. In other words, the sky is literally falling. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:50 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Ohio University Houses Students At Waterpark Resort

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Capital University, just outside Columbus, Ohio, was gearing up for the new school year when the administration found itself in a slippery situation. There weren't enough dorm rooms on campus. But a local business quickly dove in with a solution: Fort Rapids Resort, an indoor water park. Thirty students will, you might say, tread water there until space frees-up on campus. It's all included in their tuition - yes, including access to the water park itself.

Business
4:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Auto Industry's Pent-Up Demand Expected To Ease Slowly

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

If economists looking at the housing sector are generally optimistic, those who follow the auto industry are practically brimming with glee. Right now, the average age of cars on the road is the oldest ever recorded, at 11-and-a-half years, which means at some time, people will have to buy newer ones. As NPR's Sonari Glinton reports, that time may be now.

Read more
Business
4:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

2 Ex-Traders Accused Of Covering Up JPMorgan Losses

Federal prosecutors in the U.S. have charged two former traders in JPMorgan Chase's London office with securities fraud. The two men were part of the so-called "London Whale" case, which ended up costing the company more than $6 billion. U.S. officials say the men lied about the value of some derivatives trades to cover up mounting losses.

Pages