Morning Edition

4-9 weekday mornings.

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. 

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Pages

NPR Story
3:58 am
Tue October 29, 2013

What's A Family Supposed To Look Like?

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 7:29 am

Steve Inskeep speaks with NPR's Gene Demby and Joanna Kakissis about the recent kidnapping allegations involving a Roma couple in Greece.

All Tech Considered
1:56 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Who Has The Right To Know Where Your Phone Has Been?

Cell towers are constantly tracking the location of mobile phones. And that data, federal courts have ruled, is not constitutionally protected.
Steve Greer iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:49 am

You probably know, or should know, that your cellphone is tracking your location everywhere you go. But whether law enforcement officials should have access to that data is at the center of a constitutional debate.

Matt Blaze, a professor of computer and information science at the University of Pennsylvania, says location tracking is key to how the cell system operates.

Read more
All Tech Considered
1:55 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Etsy's New Policy Means Some Items Are 'Handmade In Spirit'

Rae Padulo creates handmade ceramics, like these holiday ornaments, for her Etsy-based company, mudstar ceramics. She's disappointed with the site's new policy to allow outsourced manufacturing. "There's nothing wrong with factory-made," she says, but "that's not what Etsy started out to be."
Courtesy of Rae Padulo

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:49 am

Under online marketplace Etsy's new policies, vendors can now use an outside manufacturer to help make their goods.

That is not going down well with some longtime sellers, who are calling the new policies a turnaround from the site's original mission.

"Their moniker is, you know, a place to buy handmade. It doesn't say a place to buy factory-made," says Rae Padulo, a potter who began selling dishes and ornaments on Etsy in 2009.

Read more
U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work
1:55 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Reverse Commutes Now Often A Daily Slog, Too

Reverse commuters, include Kathy LeVeque (in the foreground), wait for an approaching outbound Metra commuter train at the Mayfair neighborhood stop on Chicago's northwest side.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:49 am

It is still as dark as night as Jim Rix steps out of his red brick Chicago bungalow and gets into his car, parked on the street. It's 6 a.m., and the 53-year-old engineer is getting an early start on his 35-mile commute out to Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago's southwest suburbs.

"Depending upon weather and time of day, it can take 45 minutes to two hours to get to and from work," Rix says.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:01 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Biography Doesn't Hold Back On Darkest Years Of 'The Man In Black'

ABC Television Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:49 am

In early 1968, country singer Johnny Cash gave one of the defining performances of his career when he played for inmates at California's Folsom State Prison. Robert Hilburn, a music critic early in his career at the Los Angeles Times, was the only reporter to cover that legendary concert.

Read more
Strange News
5:13 am
Mon October 28, 2013

What Employees Will Say To Get A Sick Day

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 7:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Employers do fire workers who use fake excuses to call in sick, but there are still plenty of examples of this adult version of The Dog Ate My Homework, according to a new study released by the website CareerBuilder. Nearly a third of employees reported they've called in sick when they weren't really. Among the imaginative medical excuses: losing false teeth out of the car window or extreme grumpiness from quitting smoking. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Strange News
4:11 am
Mon October 28, 2013

New Venezuelan Ministry Focuses On 'Supreme Social Happiness'

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 7:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro has not had a great year. After a winning a disputed election, he faces inflation near 50 percent. Supplies of basic goods like toilet paper have run low. But now Maduro is acting. He created a new Vice Ministry of Supreme Social Happiness. It's supposed to coordinate services for the poor. We do not know of the Happiness Ministry will work but it has given a practical benefit, causing people to laugh.

It's All Politics
4:05 am
Mon October 28, 2013

A Churchill 'Quote' That U.S. Politicians Will Never Surrender

Winston Churchill opens the new headquarters of a Royal Auxiliary Air Force squadron at Croydon in 1948.
Central Press/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:28 am

This week, Congress dedicates a new bust of Winston Churchill in the Capitol's Statuary Hall. The sculpture is meant to honor the British statesman's legacy of determination and resolve.

It's also a salute to Churchill's friendship with the United States — summed up in an oft-quoted line that Maine Sen. Angus King used during the recent congressional debt-ceiling debate.

As King put it: "Winston Churchill once famously observed that Americans will always do the right thing, only after they have tried everything else."

Read more
NPR Story
4:05 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Spying Allegations Rock U.S.-German Relations

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 7:00 am

German officials are scrambling to gather more information and U.S. officials are assessing diplomatic options in the wake of claims that the U.S. National Security Agency has been monitoring German Chancellor Angela Merkel's cellphone for more than a decade. Renee Montagne talks to Tim Naftali of the New America Foundation about America's history of spying and what this recent news means for the U.S. relationship with its European allies.

NPR Story
4:05 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Saudi Women Get In Driver's Seat To Protest Ban

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 7:00 am

Dozens of women in Saudi Arabia drove cars Saturday in open protest against the kingdom's ban on women driving. NPR's Deborah Amos, who has been covering the story, speaks with Steve Inskeep about the outcome and implications of the protest.

Music Interviews
2:43 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Arcade Fire On Its Brand-New Beat

Arcade Fire's new album, Reflektor, comes out Tuesday.
JF Lalonde Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 4:22 pm

Fans of Arcade Fire might be feeling a bit of culture shock. The group has been called the world's most successful indie rock band — but its new album, Reflektor, explores the Haitian roots of band member Regine Chassagne.

Read more
Business
2:42 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Moving In With Manufacturers, Amazon Delivers A New Approach

Faster delivery is the new frontier of Internet competition.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 10:58 am

Amazon's business is built on three basic concepts: faster delivery, greater selection, and cheaper prices.

In service of that, it has built enormous warehouses staffed largely by robots that shuttle around, pulling goods out of bins at remarkable speed. It can take just a matter of minutes to go from order to shipment.

And lately it's pursuing a program where Amazon goes directly into manufacturers and manages their logistics and online retailing.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:41 am
Mon October 28, 2013

The Slow, Uneven Rebuilding After Superstorm Sandy

Samantha Langello and her daughter Alanna, 2, stand in front of their flood-damaged house in Fox Beach on Staten Island, N.Y.
Joel Rose NPR

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 10:33 am

After Hurricane Sandy, the south shore of Staten Island looked like it had been hit by a tsunami. The storm surge devastated whole neighborhoods suddenly, in a matter of hours. In the year since the storm, some families have been rebuilding their homes and their lives. Others are ready to sell their flood-damaged properties and move on.

Joe Salluzzo lives in a neighborhood called New Dorp Beach, a few blocks from the ocean. He rode out the storm on the second story of his brick bungalow, which he's been repairing himself ever since.

Read more
Strange News
4:50 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Row Over Stilton Could Cause A Stink

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 5:43 am

The British government has told a pub in the village of Stilton that it can't call its cheese Stilton. The name is protected by a law that says true Stilton cheese can come from three specific regions — not Cambridgeshire, where Stilton is located. The pub's landlord is weighing his legal options.

Around the Nation
4:44 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Scottsdale, Ariz., Warms Up To Ice Cream Trucks

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 5:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with the triumph of the ice cream truck. Last week, we told you a Swedish businessman so hated the noise, he drilled holes in the tires of an ice cream truck. Maybe Scottsdale, Arizona will be more receptive. The city lifted a decades-old ice cream truck ban. Dismissing fears of accidents or strangers on the streets, officials gave a license to Sydney Kirsch. She tells The Arizona Republic she will sell ice cream when not studying in high school.

NPR Story
4:37 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Soulless 'Counselor' Is Terminally Bleak

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 5:43 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. The writer Cormac McCarthy has won a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. He has never written an original screenplay produced until now. That film, "The Counselor," opens this weekend. Kenneth Turan has our review.

Read more
NPR Story
4:37 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Before Sherlock: An Ancient Chinese Sleuth's Enduring Appeal

Hong Kong director Tsui Hark's latest film, Young Detective Dee: Rise of the Sea Dragon, just hit cinemas in Asia.
Sam Yeh AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 11:19 am

The sleuthing exploits of Judge Dee, a character based on a 7th-century Chinese official, are gripping new audiences as new generations of writers, movie directors and storytellers tell his tale and build on his legend.

Judge Dee was cracking tough cases for centuries in China before Sherlock Holmes even got a clue. But perhaps more importantly, his stories continue to inform ordinary Chinese people's understanding of justice and law.

Read more
NPR Story
4:37 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Why We Care More About Losses Than Gains

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 5:43 am

People care more about losing a dollar than gaining a dollar. This ideal, known as loss aversion, has national consequences, too, according to new research. David Greene discusses the phenomenon with NPR's Shankar Vedantam.

Planet Money
2:29 am
Fri October 25, 2013

What Happens When You Just Give Money To Poor People?

Bernard Omondi got $1,000 from GiveDirectly.
Jacob Goldstein NPR

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 9:34 am

For more of our reporting on this story, please see our work in The New York Times Magazine and on This American Life.

Read more
StoryCorps
2:28 am
Fri October 25, 2013

'Never Say Goodbye': A Love And Life Kept Vivid

Danny and Annie Perasa on their wedding day on April 22, 1978.
Courtesy of Annie Perasa

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 10:08 am

When we first met Danny and Annie Perasa in 2004, we heard about how their first date unfolded into an on-the-spot marriage proposal. We got a sense of Danny's big personality and his deep love for his wife. And we heard about his daily love notes to her.

To my princess, the weather out today is extremely rainy, I'll call you at 11:20 in the morning. And I love you, I love you, I love you.

Read more
Health
2:27 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Clinics Close As Texas Abortion Fight Continues

In July, abortion rights advocates marched in Austin, Texas, to protest legislation that could shut down all but five abortion clinics and restrict abortion rights throughout the state.
Tamir Kalifa AP

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 9:52 am

The fight over abortion in Texas is being played out in federal court, where abortion rights activists are challenging a new state law.

The measure bans abortions at 20 weeks, adds building requirements for clinics and places more rules on doctors who perform abortions. Some clinics have shut down, saying they can't comply with the law set to go into effect Oct. 29.

Read more
All Tech Considered
4:14 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

A Diagram Of HealthCare.gov, Based On The People Who Built It

An attempt to draw out the various parts of HealthCare.gov's tech system, based on the testimony of its contractors.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 11:52 am

One of the major issues that's emerged since the failed rollout of HealthCare.gov is that there was no lead contractor on the project. (CGI Federal was the biggest contractor — awarded the most expensive contract — but says it did not have oversight over the other parts of the system.) Instead, the quarterbacking was left to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, a subagency of the Department of Health and Human Services.

Read more
Religion
5:32 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Vatican Challenges Church Of England ... To A Cricket Match

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 7:07 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The Vatican has announced it will be engaging in sporting diplomacy with a new team. St. Peter's Cricket Club will be made up of priests and seminarians in cricket-loving countries like India. Still, the Vatican couldn't resist throwing down this challenge to longtime rival the Church of England: Form a team and make it the Anglicans versus the Catholics at Lord's Cricket Ground in London - what you could call the Mecca of that sport. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Strange News
4:17 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Norwegian Town Uses Mirrors To Try To Come Into The Light

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 7:07 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

A town in Norway has spent all 100 of its winters in the shade. The town is in the mountains, and when the winter sun sinks low, its rays never reach the people in town. That may change. A local artist campaigned to have mirrors placed on a mountainside. When unveiled on October 31st, they should drop a patch of sunlight in the town square. The artist says it will be good for, quote, "the pale little children in town."

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
4:10 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Red Sox Take One-Game Lead In World Series

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 7:07 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Boston Red Sox have taken a one game to none lead over St. Louis in the World Series, beating the Cardinals eight to one last night at Fenway Park. The evening started off badly for the visitors and didn't improve from there. NPR's Mike Pesca was there and has this report.

Read more
NPR Story
4:10 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Teacher Killed By 12-Year-Old Student Remembered

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 7:07 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Two students are in the hospital after a shooting at a middle school in Nevada. A 12-year-old boy killed a popular teacher and then himself. Last night, people in Sparks, Nevada remembered teacher Michael Landsberry. Will Stone reports from KUNR.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Read more
Author Interviews
2:17 am
Thu October 24, 2013

'Blockbusters': Go Big Or Go Home, Says Harvard Professor

Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 10:54 am

Movies like The Dark Knight or the Harry Potter series are touted as blockbusters — big-budget spectacles sure to make box office bank.

And though wannabe blockbusters can — and do — flop, like the $120 million disappointment Speed Racer, big budget is still the way to go, according to Harvard Business School professor Anita Elberse.

Read more
Books News & Features
2:17 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Pen Pal Of Young 'Jerry' Salinger May Have Been First To Meet Holden

J.D. Salinger wrote nine letters and postcards to aspiring Canadian writer Marjorie Sheard.
Graham Haber The Morgan Library & Museum

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 8:47 am

Fans of the reclusive J.D. Salinger are in their element these days.

Read more
StoryCorps
2:16 am
Thu October 24, 2013

A 'Not Normal' Family That Knows How To Laugh At Itself

Rebecca Greenberg made her first visit to StoryCorps with her mother. This time her father, Carl, joined them for some laughter and reminiscing.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 10:27 am

When we first heard from Laura Greenberg and her daughter, Rebecca, in 2011, Laura recounted what it was like to grow up in a family that was, as she explained it, "not normal."

"We're yelling, and we're pinching, and we're hugging, and we're cursing, and we peed with the door open," she said about her childhood in Queens, N.Y., in the 1950s. "I didn't know this was not normal behavior. I didn't know people had secrets; you didn't tell your mother everything."

Read more
Around the Nation
4:47 am
Wed October 23, 2013

After Four Decades, Cuomo Finally Watches 'The Godfather'

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 5:47 am

When the movie The Godfather came out in 1972, a young New York lawyer and future governor named Mario Cuomo didn't see it. He objected to stereotyping Italian-Americans as mobsters. But as first reported by The New York Times, Cuomo has finally ended his 41-year boycott and had a look.

Pages