Morning Edition

Every weekday for over three decades, Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

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A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep and David Greene in Washington, D.C.; Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA; and Bill Wheelhouse in Springfield, IL. These hosts often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel to report on the news firsthand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.  The WUIS/SJ-R Business Report with Tim Landis brings it home.

Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, WUIS and Illinois Public Radio journalists, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member Station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Obama Weighs In: No Peas In Guacamole

Jul 2, 2015
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Having clinched the long-sought prize of same-sex marriage in all 50 states, some long-time advocates are now waking up to the realization that they need to find a new job. At least one major same-sex marriage advocacy group is preparing to close down and other LGBT organizations are retooling.

They have grown from a ragtag group with a radical idea into a massive multi-million dollar industry of slick and sophisticated sellers of a dream. Today, their very success has made their old jobs obsolete.

The 66th floor of Panama City's Trump Tower is a fine spot to experience Panama's booming economy. Beyond the building's windows, hundreds of skyscrapers stretch the length of the capital's skyline. Inside, a hand of blackjack will set you back $200, but all-you-can-drink champagne costs just $10.

On average, economic growth in Panama has topped 8 percent in the last five years, making the country the envy of its struggling Latin American neighbors.

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Tuesday would have been the last day of operation for 10 clinics in Texas that provide abortion services. But on Monday the U.S. Supreme Court, in one of its final actions of this session, said the clinics can remain open while clinic lawyers ask the court for a full review of a strict abortion law.

Two dozen states have passed regulations similar to the ones being fought over in Texas.

An agency of the federal government will have to stop doing business today. That's because members of Congress went home last week for the July Fourth recess without reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank.

The bank helps American companies sell their goods overseas. The bank's critics say they're stopping corporate welfare.

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Tunisia was in shock after at least 38 foreign tourists were killed Friday at a beachside hotel, apparently by one man: Saifeddine Rezgui, who was in turn killed by police.

Amid the horror, there was defiance in the air in the seaside town of Sousse. Hundreds of foreign tourists decided to stay, and were out on the beaches. And local residents held a patriotic demonstration, waving the red national flag and chanting about unity in a palm-fringed square.

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