Morning Edition

Weekdays 4-9 AM

Every weekday for over three decades, Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

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A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep and David Greene in Washington, D.C.; Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA; and Bill Wheelhouse in Springfield, IL. These hosts often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel to report on the news firsthand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.  The WUIS/SJ-R Business Report with Tim Landis brings it home.

Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, WUIS and Illinois Public Radio journalists, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member Station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Around the Nation
6:07 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Napster Billionaire Spends Big On Upcoming Wedding

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 1:46 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with good luck to Sean Parker and his bride-to-be. She's a singer; he's a Facebook billionaire and founder of Napster. Mr. Parker committed $10 million to their wedding. He paid for waterfalls, bridges and ancient ruins created for the occasion. Guests will wear outfits created by the costume designer from "Lord of the Rings."

Europe
6:02 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Resignation Letter Is Good Enough To Eat

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 1:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Chris Holmes worked at a London airport, but his true love was always making cakes. So Holmes decided to quit his job to run his own bake shop, which brings us to his resignation letter. He wrote it on a cake with icing. He said he wanted more time with his family. He wished his colleagues well. It took two hours, more time than he had ever spent on a birthday message or anniversary wish. A photo of his work went viral, publicity that he really felt was icing on the cake.

Code Switch
3:42 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Seeking Oakland's Soul In The 'New Oakland'

A DJ plays for a crowded street at Oakland's Art Murmur celebration in February.
David Kashevaroff

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 7:17 pm

Oakland, Calif., was once a hub of African-American culture on the West Coast.

In the 1940s and '50s, Oakland was home to an entertainment corridor nicknamed The Harlem of the West. In the '60s, the city gave birth to the Black Panther Party. By the '80s, black folks made up nearly half of Oakland's population.

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National Security
3:42 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Adding Security Along Marathons Would Be Herculean Task

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 1:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, the twin bombings at the Boston Marathon struck at a very special type of sporting event. Marathons have been called the most democratic of sports, with the fewest physical barriers between athlete and spectator.

NPR's Mike Pesca examines whether the attack could permanently damage that accessibility.

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National Security
3:42 am
Wed April 17, 2013

FBI Encourages Public To Turn Over What They May Know

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 1:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

The special agent in charge of the FBI Boston office hopes someone somewhere heard something that will point to a suspect in the Boston Marathon attack.

(SOUNDBITE OF STATEMENT)

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Animals
1:56 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Lionfish Attacking Atlantic Ocean Like A Living Oil Spill

Lionfish, like this one spotted in the Bahamas, are a nonnative predatory fish that can decimate native fish populations.
Cammy Clark MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 12:45 pm

A gluttonous predator is power-eating its way through reefs from New York to Venezuela. It's the lionfish.

And although researchers are coming up with new ways to protect some reefs from the flamboyant maroon-striped fish, they have no hope of stopping its unparalleled invasion.

Lad Akins has scuba dived in the vibrant reefs of the Bahamas for many years. But when he returned a couple years ago, he saw almost no fish smaller than his hand.

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Sweetness And Light
1:55 am
Wed April 17, 2013

The Pitch For More No. 42s

Jackie Robinson during spring training at Vero Beach, Fla., in March 1956. It would be Robinson's 10th and last year with the Brooklyn Dodgers.
AP

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 1:46 pm

Yet another movie about Jackie Robinson arrived as baseball held its annual commemorative celebration of No. 42, but officials of the game are fretting over the fact that only 8 1/2 percent of current major leaguers are black.

Given that African-Americans only constitute about 13 percent of the U.S. population, and that rarely do we have any industry or school system or community population that correlates exactly to the whole country's racial or ethnic makeup, baseball's somewhat smaller black cohort hardly seems like an issue to agonize over.

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Around the Nation
4:46 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Changes Help San Diego Homeless, But Long Road Remains Ahead

Wanda Rayborn, 63, was homeless for nine years and was living under a tree in downtown San Diego two years ago. She now lives in a newly renovated efficiency apartment — part of an initiative to help get homeless people off the streets.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 2:05 pm

Two years ago, we reported on an ambitious campaign to end homelessness in downtown San Diego, a city with one of the largest homeless populations in the nation. The effort involved an unprecedented coalition of business leaders, community groups and government agencies.

At the time, some advocates for the homeless — after years of seeing other, failed efforts to get people off city streets — were skeptical that the campaign would amount to much.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
1:04 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Update On The Boston Marathon Bombings

President Obama makes a statement about Monday's explosions at the Boston Marathon. Morning Edition co-hosts David Greene and Steve Inskeep speak to NPR reporters covering the story in Washington and Boston.

Explosions At Boston Marathon
11:44 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Obama Calls Boston Bombings 'An Act Of Terrorism'

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

President Obama said the FBI is investigating Monday's twin bombings at the Boston Marathon "as an act of terrorism." Meanwhile, law enforcement officials are asking the public to submit photos and videos from the scene. And Boston Mayor Tom Menino said that as the city grieves the victims it is also proud of those who helped in the explosions' aftermath.

Explosions At Boston Marathon
9:47 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Investigating The Boston Marathon Bombings

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Morning Edition co-hosts Steve Inskeep and David Greene discuss the investigation of Monday's Boston Marathon explosions with Roger Cressey, a former counterterrorism investigator and member of the National Security Council, and NPR's Dina Temple-Raston.

Around the Nation
7:01 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Violating His Own Rule, Judge Fines Himself

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:01 am
Tue April 16, 2013

'Boston Globe' Reporter Was Near Blast At Marathon

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Witnesses to yesterday's Boston Marathon explosions include David Abel. He's a reporter for the Boston Globe. He was at the finish line yesterday afternoon around 3 o'clock, and Mr. Abel, what did you see and feel?

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Around the Nation
7:01 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Blasts Don't Stop 78-Year-Old Marathoner In Boston

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Authorities Comb Evidence For Clues In Boston Blasts

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Steve Inskeep talks to Juan Zarate, former deputy national security adviser for combating terrorism, about what investigators are looking for the day after the explosions at the Boston Marathon.

Around the Nation
4:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Store Manager Was Close To Blasts In Boston

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I'm David Greene.

Let's work through what we know about yesterday's explosions at the Boston Marathon.

INSKEEP: Hours of struggle and accomplishment changed in an instant. Mirabelle Garcia had just finished running her ninth Boston Marathon.

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Around the Nation
4:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Deadly Blasts Punctuate Boston Marathon's Finish Line

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

The lead agency in yesterday's Boston Marathon explosions is the FBI. Federal investigators say this morning they are doing all they can to get answers, but there is still much they do not know.

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Planet Money
2:55 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Most People Are Supposed To Pay This Tax. Almost Nobody Actually Pays It.

Amazon doesn't charge sales tax in most states — but you may still be on the hook to pay the tax.
Scott Sady AP

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:17 pm

The majority of Americans have now filed their taxes. And the majority of Americans have done so incorrectly.

There is one mistake, in particular, that lots of people made: They bought tax-free things online or in another state — and they failed to pay tax on their purchase in their home state.

It's called a use tax. As far as I can tell, accountants and tax lawyers are some of the only people who pay it.

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Author Interviews
2:53 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Is The United States A 'Dispensable Nation'?

Michael Krinke iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

In The Dispensable Nation: American Foreign Policy In Retreat, former State Department adviser Vali Nasr describes veteran diplomat Richard Holbrooke being all but frozen out by President Obama's inner circle, for whom Nasr believes diplomacy was a "lost art."

Instead of engaging civilians to find political solutions in Afghanistan and beyond, they would look first to the military and intelligence agencies for solutions that were politically popular — that includes getting U.S. troops out of Afghanistan.

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Law
2:52 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Adoption Case Brings Rare Family Law Dispute To High Court

This October 2011 photo provided by Melanie Capobianco shows her adoptive daughter, Veronica, trick-or-treating in Charleston, S.C. The child has been the focus of a custody battle between her adoptive parents and her birth father.
Courtesy of Melanie Capobianco AP

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Take the usual agony of an adoption dispute. Add in the disgraceful U.S. history of ripping Indian children from their Native American families. Mix in a dose of initial fatherly abandonment. And there you have it — a poisonous and painful legal cocktail that goes before the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday.

At issue is the reach of the Indian Child Welfare Act, known as ICWA. The law was enacted in 1978 to protect Native American tribes from having their children almost literally stolen away and given to non-Indian adoptive or foster parents.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:57 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Remembering Colin Davis, A Conductor Beloved Late In Life

The late Colin Davis conducting the last night of Proms at London's Royal Albert Hall in September 1968.
George Freston Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:59 am

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Around the Nation
6:37 am
Mon April 15, 2013

6 Year Old Takes Car Out To Get Chinese

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 12:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. People in Lapeer, Michigan called to report a car moving erratically. Callers said it looked like a six-year-old was driving. Police discovered a six-year-old was driving. He'd taken the keys off the counter at home and taught himself what to do. Asked what he thought he was doing, the boy explained that he was going out for Chinese food, of course.

Around the Nation
6:30 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Happy Birthday: Federal Income Tax Turns 100

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 12:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

If you weren't finished with your taxes, you may have been buried in paperwork over the weekend. Not true for last-minute filers a century ago. While this year's 1040 tax form has 214 pages of instructions, in 1913 it was just one page. There was a section for how farmers should claim livestock including animal wool and hides. There was a line for losses sustained in firestorm or shipwreck. But sorry, the family account at the country store was not deductible.

Europe
3:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Retaliating Against U.S., Russia Bars 18 Americans

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 12:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Tensions have been increasing between the United States and Russia, and things unraveled even more over the weekend. Russia named 18 Americans who will be barred from entering Russia because of an alleged involvement in human rights violations. Here's NPR's Corey Flintoff.

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Asia
3:39 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Examining North Korea

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:48 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

North Korea is celebrating the birthday of its founder, Kim Il Sung. The North's leader has been dead nearly 20 years but is treated like a god. And of course, his son; now, his grandson; have both succeeded him. As part of this year's festivities, North Korea sponsored a marathon in the capital, Pyongyang, that drew athletes from around the world; an event that came even though the North has been threatening a nuclear strike against the United States.

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Business
3:39 am
Mon April 15, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: The Cicada Index.

Every 17 years, these nasty, loud, little insects known as Brood 2 cicadas emerge in staggering numbers - as many as on billion per square mile from the Carolinas to Connecticut.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

They have a grinding song. They have an endless appetite for vegetation, and most people along the East Coast dread their arrival. But savvy investors know better.

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Latin America
3:39 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Chavez Successor Wins Presidential Election

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 12:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene. And Steve Inskeep, it's good to have you back from Venezuela. Sounds like a great trip.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
2:05 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Inside The Brains Of People Over 80 With Exceptional Memory

Lou Ann Schachner, 84, and Jay Schachner, 81, are volunteers with the Northwestern University SuperAging Project. They keep track of all their plans in a shared calendar. She loves to cook and study French and he is a part-time tax lawyer.
Samantha Murphy for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 7:45 am

Most research on memory loss in the elderly focuses on dementia, Alzheimer's disease or other brain diseases.

But neuroscientist Emily Rogalski from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine knew there is great variation in how good memory is in older people. Most have memory loss to varying degrees, but some have strong memories, even well into old age.

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Shots - Health News
2:04 am
Mon April 15, 2013

How Exercise And Other Activities Beat Back Dementia

An older man performs exercises in Mumbai, India. Research suggests that moderate physical exercise may be the best way to keep our brains healthy as we age.
Rajesh Kumar Singh AP

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 7:45 am

The numbers are pretty grim: More than half of all 85-year-olds suffer some form of dementia.

But here's the good news: Brain researchers say there are ways to boost brain power and stave off problems in memory and thinking.

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Author Interviews
2:03 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Friedkin, Who Pushed Film Forward, Looks Back

HarperCollins Publishers

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:08 pm

As a kid in Chicago, director William Friedkin liked to frighten little girls with scary stories. When he grew up, he scared the rest of us with a little girl — Regan MacNeil, who is possessed by the devil in his horror classic The Exorcist.

And in The French Connection, he put knots in our stomachs with one of the great movie chases in American cinema.

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