Illinois Edition

Weekdays at noon, replays M-Th weeknights at 7.

Illinois Edition is WUIS’ local news magazine covering the arts and issues of central Illinois.  Illinois Edition airs weekdays during the noon hour (and is replayed at 7 p.m. M-Th).  On Fridays, State Week airs from 12:30-1 P.M.

WUIS News Director Sean Crawford hosts the program.  

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Regional
12:10 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Film Recounts The Lincoln Memorial Garden Designer's Life

Jens Jensen in the Lincoln Memorial Garden planning process
Credit Lincolnmemorialgarden.org

Jens Jensen's work continues on more than 60 years after his death.  The influential  landscape architect is remembered as a conservationist.  His vision is on display at Lincoln Memorial Garden in Springfield, which he designed.  

On Wednesday June 4, a screening of the film "Jens Jensen: The Living Green" will take place at UIS in Brookens Auditorium at 7 p.m.

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Lincoln
8:45 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Effort To Mark Historic Trees At Oak Ridge Cemetery

Credit flickr/DavidWilson

You can take a "Spirited Stroll Into The Past" this Saturday afternoon at Oak Ridge Cemetery.  The Lincoln Monument Association has an event that is designed to raise funds to mark historic trees at the site.   

From 1-4 p.m.,  you can tour and hear about some of those trees, visit the newly renovated Lincoln's Tomb and hear the Springfield Municipal Band perform.  Ice cream and cake will be sold.
 

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Business
4:54 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Business Report: Esquire Theater Future, Ross Isaac Closes And Joe Rogers' Chili To Re-Open

The Esquire Theater in Springfield
Credit CinemaTreasures.org/Norman Plant

Tim Landis, Business Editor of the State Journal-Register, joins WUIS' Sean Crawford for this week's business report.

They discuss how the clock is ticking for the former Esquire Theatre property at MacArthur Boulevard and South Grand Avenue, news involving a pair of restaurants and a court weighs in on Ameren's big project for a transmission line across central Illinois.  

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Transportation
9:13 am
Fri May 16, 2014

"Curb Your Car" Next Week

Credit Tejvan Pettinger/flickr

The Springfield-Sangamon County Regional Planning Commission wants you to leave the car at home next week.  Instead, think about biking, walking, running or using the bus.  

Curb Your Car Week begins Monday and several business are offering incentives. There is also a group ride from Washington Park on Wednesday morning, May 21.  A night ride that goes through downtown is on Saturday May 24.

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Education Desk
11:05 am
Wed May 14, 2014

WUIS Engage: Chris Farrell Discusses The Impact Of Education On The Economy

Chris Farrell
Credit Marketplace

On May 2, WUIS held an engagement event at the Hoogland Center for the Arts.  It featured Chris Farrell, Economics Editor for the Marketplace programs and Business Week. 

He touched on several education related topics and gave his views. 

"I think education and local economic development are two sides of the same coin," Farrell said. "When someone says what should we do to grow our economy, simply say education."

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Harvest Desk
10:00 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Chilli Parlor Re-Opens Serving Century Old Recipe

WUIS/Lee Strubinger

A Springfield culinary landmark has re-opened it's doors.  The Dew Chilli parlor was established in 1909, but it closed about 20 years ago.    Mark Roberts is the new owner and a longtime fan.   Lee Strubinger went to the parlor's recent grand opening and he presents this audio postcard:

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Legal
12:19 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Interview: Brian Banks, Former NFL Player & Exoneree

Brian Banks
Credit facebook.com/TheBrianBanksStory

 To date, over 300 people have been let out of prison before their sentences are up because of a group called The Innocence Project. Many of those people were exonerated because of advances in DNA evidence. In Springfield on Saturday, the Illinois Innocence Project hosts its 7th Defenders of the Innocent Awards Dinner. Brian Banks will be one of the key speakers. He knows first hand what it's like being in innocent and sent to prison anyway: 

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Arts
11:55 am
Thu May 1, 2014

There's Faith In The Arts At Springfield's Liturgical Festival

A bronze and silver kiddish cup by Joy Stember
Credit Springfield Art Association

The spiritual side of arts will be on display this weekend and early next week in Springfield.  It's the 20th year for the Liturgical Arts Festival.  It runs May 3-7 with a lineup that includes music, visual arts and more.

It's open to the public.  You don't need to be a member of a congregation. 

"Most of art history and music comes from the church," said Sally Schaefer, President of the Festival. "Not many years has it been secular focused.  At this time, we want to celebrate that rich heritage."

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Education Desk
8:15 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Professor Says Higher Ed Spending Brings Long Term Benefits

Walter McMahon
Credit IGPA

Illinois budget cutting has targeted higher education for more than a decade.   But a professor who has studied funding for colleges says it actually leads to more state financial problems.
 

Walter McMahon is a Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Illinois.  He says more investment would serve the state well in the future.

McMahon's column below on higher education spending is part of the Institute of Government and Public Affairs' Illinois Budget Policy Toolbox.

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Harvest Desk
7:48 am
Tue April 29, 2014

Public, Private Partners Key To Local Food Success

Students at Waukon High School in Iowa grow carrots, tomatoes, lettuce and other vegetables for school lunches in an on-campus greenhouse
Credit Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

As FoodCorps service member Ashley Turk navigates her way through a brand-new greenhouse in the courtyard at Waukon High School in the northeast corner of Iowa, she points to a robust supply of red and green lettuce leaves growing neatly in rows.

“It’s huge,” she says. “We cut it off and it just keeps growing.”

The greenhouse lettuce is among the offerings in the school’s salad bar. And students will soon be growing carrots, tomatoes and other vegetables, Turks says.

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Environment
11:41 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Earth Friendly Event In Springfield This Weekend

Lake Springfield
Credit flickr/Denny Armstrong

The tradition of Earth Day Springfield continues Saturday April 26 with a festival designed to showcase what the city has done to become more "green."

"The biggest initiatives that Public Works is pushing for right now is cleaning up the city," said Abby Walden with the office.  "Whether that's making sure people are getting rid of their trash correctly, recycling...  as well as being responsible for how we use our material.  For instance, instead of just throwing it away maybe finding a consignment shop or an organization that can use it."  

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Education Desk
10:46 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Interview: John Tinker & The Landmark Case On Students' Right To Free Speech

John Tinker
Credit Rachel Otwell/WUIS

Public schools are not allowed to forbid students' right to freedom of speech, unless it disrupts education. But that wasn't necessarily true until a court case from Iowa made its way to the Supreme Court back in the 60s. John Tinker was behind the case, known as Tinker v. Des Moines. He and other students went to school wearing black arm bands to protest the Vietnam War. They were kicked out and told not to come back to class unless they removed the bands and the rest as they say, is history.

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Health Desk
6:07 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Unmet Needs: Living With Mental Illness In Central Illinois

Debra and Zach Medlyn
Credit Sean Powers

According to federal labor statistics, there are more psychiatrists working in Illinois than most states, with the bulk of that service concentrated in the Chicagoland area. But mental health providers say there are major gaps in service across Illinois, especially downstate. 

Zach Medlyn, 27, of Champaign did not start hearing the voices until about seven years ago, when he was a student at the University of Illinois.

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Statehouse
9:04 am
Wed April 16, 2014

The Vanishing Millionaire Tax

Brian Gaines
Credit IGPA

House Speaker Michael Madigan pulled his plan for a so-called "millionaire tax" last week.   The plan would have raised taxes on those earning $1 million or more a year, with the proceeds going to schools.  It would have required a constitutional change. 

Professor Brian Gaines has studied the idea.  He's with the Institute of Government and Public Affairs at the University of Illinois.  He called Madigan's change of heart a bit surprising:

Brian Gaines' essay on the "millionaire tax" -

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Health Desk
5:40 am
Mon April 14, 2014

"Making Sense Of Obamacare" Lecture At UIS

Prof. Ted Marmor
Credit Brandeis.edu

Ted Marmor has studied the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.  The author and Professor Emeritus at Yale sees both good and bad with the new law.

"My overall view is simple. That it's a very confusing piece of legislation, not very well explained," he said.

"It perpetuates the cost and complexity of American medical care. But it makes some improvement in the availability of health insurance and the protection of some Americans from being devastated by expensive hospital stays and expensive pharmaceutical treatment."

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Education Desk
6:57 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Charter Schools: What Does The Future Hold?

Teacher Mr. Gilbert at Roberston Charter School in Decatur
Rachel Otwell/WUIS

Charter schools have long been a divisive issue. Supporters say they allow schools to teach kids free of burdensome regulations.  Opponents say they take money away from traditional schools.  In Illinois this year, those views are colliding.  In the final installment of our series, we find out about the fight at the statehouse and what it might mean for charters:

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Harvest Desk
10:00 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Vertical Farming: Lofty Vision, Uncertain Future

Flourescent or LED lamps provide the spectrum of light to sustain plant growth in vertical farms.
Peter Gray/WUIS

Farmers are making inroads supplying local food to hungry city "foodies", but many producers are trying to grow more food in urban centers. City real estate is at a premium, so some producers are finding more space by using what’s called “vertical farming,” and going up rather than spreading out.

Growers across the country are heading indoors, using greenhouses and hydroponics – growing plants in a water and nutrient solution instead of soil and using lamps to replace sunlight. Vertical farming takes that to a new level.

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Science
5:56 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Author Explains The Demise Of The Passenger Pigeon

It's hard to believe that in the early 1800's, roughly 40 percent of the birds in North America were passenger pigeons.  Yet, a century later, the species was hunted to extinction.  The last one died in captivity in 1914.

Naturalist Joel Greenberg has written about this cautionary tale.  He will give the Illinois State Museum's Science Series lecture Wednesday in Springfield. His book is titled "A Feathered River Across The Sky: The Passenger Pigeon's Flight To Extinction."

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State Government
8:41 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Is Cap And Trade A Financial And Environmental Solution For Illinois?

Prof. Don Fullerton
Credit University of Illinois

An Illinois professor says state government could improve it's financial predicament and lower greenhouse gas emissions at the same time.  

Don Fullerton is proposing what's known as a "cap and trade" program where a limit is placed on emissions. 

Going above the level would cost money for operations like coal fired power plants.  But even he admits it's unlikely to happen anytime soon. 

Read Fullerton's proposal in the article below:

Taxing Waste, not Work: Cap-and-Trade as a Revenue Source

By Don Fullerton

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DEMO Project
1:39 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Local Professor Combines Art, Lincoln & Drones

Erica Holst, curator of collections at SAA and artist Mike Miller
Credit Rachel Otwell/WUIS

This weekend two openings will take place on the campus of the Springfield Art Association. One will combine the artworks of University of Illinois Springfield faculty in an exhibit called, Trigger: New Work by UIS Art Faculty. That will be in the new M.G. Nelson Family Gallery. The reception is on Friday, 5:30-7:30pm. The exhibit will run through April 25.  

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Lincoln
9:47 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Lincoln Tomb Set To Re-Open

Credit wikipedia

Oak Ridge Cemetery is the 2nd most visited cemetery in the U.S.  The main reason is Abraham Lincoln.   The 16th President, his wife Mary and three of their four sons are interred there.

Since last fall, visitors could go see the tomb and stand outside.  But the interior was closed off for maintenance work.  It re-opens on Tuesday April 1.

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Regional
8:26 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Annual Figure Skating Event In Springfield This Weekend

You don't need to leave the Springfield area for a great ice show this weekend.  The Springfield Figure Skating Club puts on the annual Spotlight On Ice performance at the Nelson Center.   This year's program is titled "Give Our Regards To Broadway" with music from Broadway shows.  Kids and adults will perform.

"You usually have to go to bigger, metropolitan type areas to see ice shows," Club board member Monica Polistina  said.  "So we're really excited that this is a hidden jewel in the capitol city to have Spotlight on Ice."

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Arts
9:15 am
Thu March 27, 2014

New Sangamon Valley Youth Symphony Exec. Director

Elle Pressly
Credit WUIS

The Sangamon Valley Youth Symphony has a new Executive Director. 

Elle Pressly is a clarinetist who majored in music at the University of Illinois.  She now teaches music education in the Jacksonville School District.

Her new role will become full time when the school year ends.  It will involve marketing, fundraising and handling the day to day operations of the SVYS.  

The organization provides orchestral instruction to area youth,  as young as 3rd grade.  

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ALPLM
8:00 am
Tue March 25, 2014

"Women & The Right To Vote: Does It Matter?" - Event Thursday

Angela Winand (left) & Eileen Mackevich

It's been nearly a century since women gained the right to vote through a federal amendment. But there are still lessons to be learned from the suffrage movement, and many women still face inequality. Female lawmakers, historians, and political scientists will convene at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum's Union Theatre in Springfield on Thursday night to discuss the lasting impact of women's suffrage. Issues discussed will include the fight for equal pay and representation in government.

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Statehouse
6:00 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Reducing The Number Of State Laws Not So Simple

Credit dnr.illinois.gov

The name “lawmaker” implies someone who helps pass laws.  But some who serve in the role are critical of that part of the job description.  Lee Strubinger looks at why they say there are too many laws on the books. 

Every year when the Illinois General Assembly goes in to session, a regular drumbeat of new proposals are debated.  They deal with topics from crime, to regulation and even seemingly innocuous measures to honor someone or something.    

More than 600 new laws were signed in the last year alone.

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Sports
12:23 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

A Chat With UIS Athletic Director Kim Pate

Kim Pate
Credit UIS Athletics

The University of Illinois Springfield has come a long way with athletics in the past decade.  Now a Division II school, UIS has added 6 programs in that time.   That brings the total of teams to 11. 

Yet, the expansion has also brought criticism from those who question if sports are part of the school's mission.

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Science
10:54 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Science Lecture Looks At Early Spanish Exploration Of Interior U.S.

Credit Ill. State Museum

This month's Illinois State Museum Science Lecture Series will focus on early Spanish exploration of what would become the United States.   Dr. Kathryn Sampeck is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Illinois State University.

She has been doing archaeological research in the southeast to get a better idea of those expeditions and how they changed history.    

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Election 2014
8:43 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Interview With U.S. Senate Candidate Jim Oberweis

Jim Oberweis
Credit Oberweis for US Senate

Voters this month will decide the Republican nominee for U.S. Senate.  It's a race between two suburban businessmen, Doug Truax and Jim Oberweis.

The Oberweis name is recognizable for the Illinois based dairy business the candidate started and still owns along with an investment firm.

Oberweis,  67, is also known for his previous five failed campaigns.  That included unsuccessful attempts to run for U.S. Senate. He won a state Senate seat in 2012. 
 

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Health Desk
11:52 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Student Food Allergies Change Classroom Policies

Credit flickr/stevendepolo

About one-third of teachers are keeping food out of their classrooms to avoid problems with students who suffer from allergies and other health issues.  

Horace Mann, a Springfield based insurance company,  conducted a nationwide survey of educators that includes questions about food policies. 

The survey shows in an average elementary school classroom with about 24 students, teachers say they have 1 to 2 students with food allergies.

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Election 2014
11:54 am
Tue March 4, 2014

U.S. Senate Candidate: Republican Doug Truax

Doug Truax
Credit Truax for Senate

At the top of the ticket this year in Illinois is a race for the U-S Senate. 

Republican Doug Truax is running against a state Senator, Jim Oberweis in the G-O-P primary.  The winner will take on Democrat Dick Durbin in the fall.  

Truax is making his first bid for political office.   Oberweis lost five previous elections, including two unsuccessful bids for U-S Senate, before being elected to the Illinois General Assembly.  

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