Here & Now

M-Th 1-3 PM
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is a daily midday news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."  Hosted by Robin Young and central Illinois native Jeremy Hobson.

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled to extend the right to marry to same-sex couples in all 50 states. Among those who oppose the ruling is Jim Campbell, senior counsel for the Alliance Defending Freedom. He speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

On his final day broadcasting from Texas, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson sits down with San Antonio Mayor Ivy Taylor, who took the oath of office this week.

He asks her about San Antonio’s rapid growth, housing prices, a controversy over an anti-discrimination ordinance that protects members of the LGBT community, and the recent departure of the ride-sharing services Uber and Lyft from San Antonio.

The California State Assembly has passed a bill that would require all children – except for those with medical wavers – to receive vaccinations before attending school. Current law allows for personal belief exemptions.

Many California parents choose not to vaccinate their children out of fear that it will cause autism or other medical problems, but medical professionals assert that there is no risk of such side effects.

More and more people are putting themselves and wild animals in danger, all in the name of a cool selfie. The trend of taking exciting selfies and videos has resulted in injured animals and animal harassment charges for the humans involved.

Vicki Croke, host of WBUR’s The Wild Life blog joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about the abuse of animals in pursuit of a good selfie.

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Julia Turner, editor-in-chief of Slate, about what’s trending on social media.

Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev apologized for the deadly attack for the first time Wednesday just before a judge was set to formally sentence him to death.

“I am sorry for the lives that I’ve taken, for the suffering that I’ve caused you, for the damage that I’ve done – irreparable damage,” the 21-year-old college student said, breaking more than two years of public silence.

To the victims, he said: “I pray for your relief, for your healing.”

The Supreme Court is scheduled to rule on two landmark cases in the next few days – same-sex marriage and the Affordable Care Act. Advocates and critics of the death penalty are also watching for a ruling on the constitutionality of some lethal injection drugs.

But why do all these big cases come at the same time? What goes on behind the scenes of the Supreme Court as a session winds down? Here & Now’s Robin Young asks NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg.

As politicians across the South are stepping in to call for the removal of the Confederate battle flag and other symbols of the Confederacy, big businesses are also joining the fray. Wal-Mart, eBay, Amazon and others have promised to pull merchandise tied to the flag, in some cases adding strong arguments against the products.

Of all the ingredients she uses in her dishes, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst prizes garlic above all. “Garlic is the spine of all my cooking. I cannot imagine cooking without it,” she told host Robin Young.

Kathy gave us this primer on garlic scapes, green garlic and roasted garlic. She also brought us these four recipes:

As NATO defense ministers gather for a meeting in Brussels tomorrow, they face a central question: Just how serious is the threat from Russia? Some say they have much bigger problems than Vladimir Putin, but others fear the Kremlin is growing dangerously hostile.

Any day now, the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to decide whether or not states have the constitutional right to ban same-sex marriage. Whichever way the court goes, this ruling could create a murky legal situation for several states that allow same sex marriage, as well as several states that prohibit it.

It has been six days since nine people were shot and killed at Emanual AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina. The shooting has ignited a debate about the Confederate flag, which still flies at the statehouse in South Carolina, while the state and American flags are at half-mast.

Remembering Composer Gunther Schuller

Jun 22, 2015

Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Gunther Schuller died on Sunday at the age of 89. He was known for his versatility: as a horn player he performed with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and recorded with Miles Davis. As the head of the New England Conservatory in Boston, he introduced jazz into the curriculum. His works “Where the Word Ends” and “Dreamscape” were also performed by the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Golf has a new star – 21-year-old Jordan Spieth. He won the U.S. Open trophy yesterday with a one-stroke victory. He also won the Master’s in April, and is the youngest to win two majors in one year since 1922. Sports reporter Dave Sheinin of The Washington Post joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced that chimpanzees in captivity are now considered endangered and ineligible for certain biomedical research.

Chimps are the closely related to humans and are the preferred animal for testing. Some research will continue, but only if it’s beneficial to the chimps.

Music Legend Glen Campbell's Long Goodbye

Jun 19, 2015

Legendary performer Glen Campbell has been struggling with Alzheimer’s disease for several years. In 2011, he embarked on a farewell tour that saw him play to sold out crowds. But now he’s no longer performing. He’s living in a memory support community in Nashville.

The Obama administration is proposing new regulations aimed at cutting carbon pollution from medium and heavy-duty trucks.

Citing climate change concerns, the rule from the Environmental Protection Agency and the Transportation Department would raise fuel efficiency for rigs hauling goods like steel, oil and timber, as well as delivery vehicles and dump trucks.

The proposal will be open for public comment, and the administration is expected to have a final version next year.

Social media may always be “on fire,” but this week was especially big. There were jokes about Donald Trump’s presidential bid and deeper discussions about Rachel Dolezal’s claims of identifying as black.

Any day now, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide on King v. Burwell, the challenge to the Affordable Care Act’s provision of subsidies to health care consumers in states that did not set up their own exchanges.

If the court sides with the plaintiffs, millions of people will lose tax credits that allow them to buy health insurance, unless a stopgap measure is passed. There have been many proposals but no actual plan is in place for what happens if those subsidies in President Obama’s health law are struck down.

Here & Now Celebrates The Graduates Of 2015

Jun 19, 2015

It’s time for our annual graduation send-off tradition. A few years back, Here & Now’s Robin Young sat down with Tom Rush to talk about his iconic “Child’s Song,” written by Canadian Murray McLauchlan in the turbulent ’60s. If you are graduating, or someone you love is, grab a tissue. We’ll also give a shout-out to graduates at our home station WBUR.

Police say they’ve captured a man they suspect opened fire and killed nine people at a historic black church in Charleston, South Carolina, last night. Authorities released stills from a security video they say shows 21-year-old Dylann Roof entering the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal church about an hour before the shooting.

Today is the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, which brought down Napoleon Bonaparte for good.

But even with 200 years perspective, historians disagree about Napoleon’s legacy. Some see him as a tyrant determined to build an empire at all costs. Others give him credit for introducing ideals such as public education and meritocracy that form the basis of modern society.

The San Francisco Bay Area has always been a draw for Irish students working for the summer. They come on a special work/travel visa program that brings thousands of international college students to California each year.

But after a tragedy this week in Berkeley that took the lives of five college students from Ireland, young adults drawn to this area for school or work are feeling unsettled, as Youth Radio’s Olivia Cueva reports.

For this week’s edition of Here & Now‘s DJ Sessions, host Jeremy Hobson sits down with Travis Holcombe of KCRW, for his latest picks.

We hear artist Tish Hyman, who Holcombe says sounds a lot like Lauryn Hill, and a summer pop song from a group called Miami Horror. We also hear Jamie xx’s song “Gosh,” which Holcombe calls “my favorite track on my favorite album of the year so far.”

Jeb Bush Slow Jams The News

Jun 17, 2015


We listen to Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush “slow jam the news” with Jimmy Fallon last night on “The Tonight Show.”

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

A ferocious wildfire in Alaska is threatening homes and forest, but also one very special type of resident.

More than 500 sled dogs have been evacuated from Willow, Alaska – the traditional starting place for the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. The fire began on Sunday and spread quickly in the unusually hot, dry conditions.

Among the residents of Willow is Dallas Seavey, who has won the Iditarod three times and became its youngest-ever winner in 2013 when he took first place at age 25. He lives with almost 100 sled dogs of his own.

There are only three rules for the 10,000-mile Mongol Rally car rally from London to Mongolia: you can take any car you want, as long as it has an engine of one liter or less; you can’t have a support team or road back-up; and you have to help save the world (or, to be more specific, you have to raise at least £1,000 – about $1,500 – for the rally’s environmental charity, Cool Earth).

At the Trump Tower in New York City, real estate magnate and TV celebrity Donald Trump declared he would be “the greatest jobs president that God ever created.” He becomes the 12th candidate for the Republican nomination. We listen to excerpts of his speech.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

Will Three-Year Colleges Make The Grade?

Jun 16, 2015

With college costs rising and many students struggling with loan debt, some colleges are offering three-year bachelor’s degree programs to reduce costs and send graduates out into the world a year sooner.

The three-year degree program is common in Europe but is only beginning in the United States. Professor Paul Weinstein, who directs the M.A. in Public Management program at Johns Hopkins University, tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson why he’s a big proponent of three-year degree programs.

The number of Chinese millionaires great by a million in 2014. A report out today by the Boston Consulting Group says a strong Chinese stock market helped make the rich even richer. As Chinese wealth grows, so too does the country’s demand from travel. About a decade ago, fewer than 200,000 Chinese tourists visited the U.S. Last year, that number reached about 2 million. The rise of the Chinese middle class and new U.S.