Here and Now

M-F 11 AM-Noon, 1-3 PM
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Showtime Vs. HBO: A Fair Fight?

Jul 8, 2015

Showtime brings back two hit shows this Sunday: “Masters of Sex,” about a pair of sexuality researchers working in the ’50s and ’60s, and “Ray Donovan,” centered on a clean-up guy for Los Angeles’ rich and famous.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to talk about the premieres and how Showtime might set itself apart from HBO.

Imagine it’s the final game of the season. The stakes are high and suddenly, a quarter of your team is subbed out and replaced with – rookies.

That’s how some people in medicine describe what happens each July when senior residents move on, and a wave of 30,000 or so newly minted doctors begin their residencies at hospitals across the country.

Update 3:15 p.m.: Trading on the New York Stock Exchange has resumed.

The New York Stock Exchange says a technical problem that has suspended trading since late morning is an internal technical issue and not the result of a security breach.

The exchange made the statement in a tweet on its official Twitter account. The trading halt is ongoing.

NYSE-listed stocks are still trading on other exchanges. The Nasdaq and other exchanges are unaffected by the outage.

More allegations against Bill Cosby have emerged, this time from the comedian himself. In sworn court testimony from a 2005 sexual abuse lawsuit that was unsealed yesterday, Cosby admitted to having obtained prescription sedatives with the intention of giving them to women he wanted to have sex with. The documents were unsealed Monday, after the Associated Press went to court to compel their release.

When 32-year-old Kathryn Steinle was shot to death on a pier in San Francisco last week, attention immediately turned to her accused killer. That’s because the 45-year-old immigrant had a long felony rap sheet and a history of deportations.

It has also been reported that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) had turned over the suspect, Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, to city authorities on March 26 on an outstanding drug warrant and asked the city to notify them when he got out – something San Francisco officials apparently did not do.

Starbucks Is Raising Its Drink Prices

Jul 7, 2015

Starbucks will be charging more for its coffee drinks, despite a decline in the price of raw coffee. The company says it’s due to rising rents and wages. Jason Bellini of The Wall Street Journal joins Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd to talk about how it might affect sales and whether the competition will follow suit.

A Canadian podcast series features grown-ups reading things they wrote as kids.

All this week, we’ll hear excerpts from the series and today Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with the podcast’s creator and producer Dan Misener, as they listen to a bit of Caleb Beyers giving advice to the Prime Minister on nuclear disarmament.

Interview Highlights: Dan Misener

On how the podcast was born

While most of the attention on the impacts of fracking has focused on things like drinking water, air pollution and earthquakes, state regulators in Pennsylvania are working on another less-discussed, but no less serious, side effect of oil and gas development: forest fragmentation.

The recent Supreme Court decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act was a relief to the six and a half million Americans who receive subsidies to purchase health insurance. It was also a relief for the health insurance industry.

As the Founding Fathers established the United States of America, they had their eyes on the future and they knew they were making history. But not everyone had the same opinion of the timeline of that history.

Most thought the big day was July 4, when then Continental Congress approved the text of the Declaration of Independence and sent it to the printer. But John Adams believed July 2, 1776, was the really the big day.

Recent attacks in North Carolina have heightened the negative public perception of sharks. But for 21-year-old Australian Madison Stewart, sharks are almost family.

Since she was in her early teens, Stewart has made it her mission to preserve and educate the world about the creatures she feels so passionate about.

Confederate flags are coming down across the South as governments and institutions respond to calls to remove symbols of a racist past. At the University of Texas at Austin, thousands of students have petitioned the school to remove a statue of Jefferson Davis, who was president of the Confederate States of America during the Civil War.

DJ Session: Sounds For The Holiday Weekend

Jul 2, 2015

For the upcoming holiday weekend, this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions features KCRW’s Anthony Valadez, with new music from the artist Bilal, a trained opera singer who has now gone in a very different direction. He also shares songs from U.K. artist LA Priest, Canadian singer and musician Mocky and Argentine DJ/producer Chancha Via Circuito.

Last Friday the Supreme Court made a landmark decision for gay rights. But another institution has also played a significant role in changing American public opinion about this issue: Hollywood.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans talks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about the “Modern Family effect” and how television has changed the way Americans think about gay relationships.

Facebook is millennials’ No. 1 source for political news, according to a recent study by Pew Research Center. Now, other social media outlets are trying to get on board.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with media analyst John Carroll about social networks’ stampede to become news outlets and get journalists on staff.

The Supreme Court’s recent ruling on same-sex marriage is a striking reminder of the strides LGBT Americans have made toward acceptance in recent years.

But it wasn’t very long ago that the broader society treated them with scorn. That’s clear from a 1961 television documentary called “The Rejected.” It was one of the first to openly address sexual orientation, and was considered progressive at the time.

After the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage, couples in states around the country rushed to courthouses to get marriage licenses. Many states that had been hold-outs, including Michigan, shifted policies very quickly.

But in some places in the South, including counties in Alabama, clerks are pushing back. One clerk in Arkansas has reportedly quit in opposition. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR reporter Debbie Elliott about the trend.

Hobson & Young midshot with Here & Now logo
Kalman Zabarsky / Boston University Photography

Recent program cuts necessitate the movement of some programs to replace what was broadcast.  Additionally, the listener survey indicates some programs may benefit from new time slots. 

On July 15, NASA’s unmanned spacecraft New Horizons is expected to encounter its primary target of Pluto. It’s a project nine years in the making, and with 3 billion miles recorded, it is the longest, farthest and fastest-ever space mission.

“Time flies when you’re having fun,” Alan Stern, who leads the mission, told Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson. “We’ve crossed the entirety of the solar system and now we’re on Pluto’s doorstep.”

Obama To Expand Overtime Pay For Millions

Jun 30, 2015

President Obama announced this week that the Labor Department will expand overtime pay, in a move the administration estimates would impact 5 million U.S. workers. That would double the income threshold at which employers can avoid paying overtime.

Right now, only salaried employees earning less $23,660 a year are eligible for overtime. This rule would raise that threshold so that employees making up to $50,660 a year would get paid overtime.

Its been a busy week for the Supreme Court. Not surprisingly, that means it has been a busy week for linguists. Consider that in the last few days we’ve heard Justice Antonin Scalia use both jiggery-pokery and mummeries.

A new chorus in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is helping transgender men and women find their voices – and community. The Butterfly Music Transgender Chorus was founded by Sandi Hammond, a singer and vocal teacher, who wanted to help trans men and women learn to use their changing voices in a safe space.

Google may offer the benefit of filtering a world of data into a digestible stream of links, but new research says those results are subject to manipulation.

The study, authored by top legal and economic scholars from Columbia and Harvard University, but paid for by Google rival Yelp, says the search engine giant knowingly buries its competitors. Google refutes the findings.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has launched a 2016 campaign for president.

The Republican governor formally announced his plans in a Tuesday morning event in the gymnasium of his old high school.

He says both political parties “have failed our country” in an announcement speech calling for more compromise in politics.

Christie was once thought to be a leading White House contender, but his star has faded over the last year. He’s been hurt by a traffic scandal involving senior aides and a lagging state economy.

Our electricity system is changing rapidly around us. New sources of renewable power are meeting technologies that can crunch unprecedented amounts of data. It’s all leading to a major shakeup for how utilities do business. Dan Boyce from Here & Now’s contributor Inside Energy takes us to Fort Collins, Colorado, for a peek into our utility’s possible future.

President Obama won a series of huge victories in the Supreme Court last week, including health care and same sex marriage. And officials in South Carolina called for the removal of the Confederate flag from the state capitol grounds after nine African Americans were gunned down in a Charleston church. Here & Now’s Robin Young asks historian Julian Zelizer to put the week into historical context.

There are a number of dramatic economic stories in the news today. In Greece, banks and markets are closed, as the country edges towards a default and or exit from the eurozone.

Meanwhile, Puerto Rico’s governor now says that the commonwealth cannot pay its $72 billion in debts. And in China, stocks have tumbled into a bear market, despite a move by the central bank there to cut interest rates to a record low.

President Barack Obama has delivered a rousing eulogy for Rev. Clementa Pinckney, who was among nine who were slain at an African-American church in South Carolina last week.

“The nation shares in your grief,” Obama said Friday at the funeral for Pinckney, 41, who was shot and killed during a Bible study at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Eight others also died.

“What a good man,” Obama said. “What an example he set.”

On his final day broadcasting from Texas, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson sits down with San Antonio Mayor Ivy Taylor, who took the oath of office this week.

He asks her about San Antonio’s rapid growth, housing prices, a controversy over an anti-discrimination ordinance that protects members of the LGBT community, and the recent departure of the ride-sharing services Uber and Lyft from San Antonio.

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