All Things Considered

Weekdays 4 -6 PM

On May 3, 1971, at 5 PM, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40+ years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

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However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish, and Sean Crawford.  In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, 4-5 PM. Arun Rath hosts on the weekends.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world, along with reports from WUIS and Illinois Public Radio journalists. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fatsis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne with The Week in Politics.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

 

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Around the Nation
3:19 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Bostonians Mark 2nd Anniversary Of Marathon Bombing

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 6:49 pm

Bostonians marked the second anniversary of the marathon bombing Wednesday, all while awaiting the sentencing phase of convicted bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to begin. The jury must decide on death or life in prison — a fact that hung over the day's events.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
3:19 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Online Crafts Marketplace Etsy Prepares For Public Offering

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 5:52 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Book Reviews
5:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

These 'Voices In The Night' Whisper Of Wonders

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun April 19, 2015 5:40 pm

Beautifully made fantastic tales such as Steven Millhauser writes don't begin from nothing. As in the tradition of Nikolai Gogol, Italo Calvino and Gabriel Garcia Marquez (to name a few revered creators of fiction that carries us beyond the normal), most of them grow out of everyday incidents and lead us right up to the line between the ordinary and the magical. And sometimes they help us to cross over.

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History
5:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Andrew Johnson's Presidency Highlighted Issues With Vice Presidential Selection

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 6:45 pm

NPR's Robert Siegel interviews University of Virginia historian Barbara Perry about the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Andrew Johnson presidency. Perry explains how he was chosen as vice president, and how he suddenly became president after President Abraham Lincoln's assassination.

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Politics
4:26 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Presidential Campaign Logos Reach New Level Of Sophistication

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 6:45 pm

From water bottles and bumper stickers, to fundraising emails and Twitter accounts, the logos of the 2016 presidential candidates will soon be plastered across the country. Graphic designer Armin Vit tells NPR about the designs so far.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Europe
4:26 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

When Rates Turn Negative, Banks Pay Customers To Borrow

Earlier this year, the European Central Bank, headed by Mario Draghi, launched a bond-buying program to drive down interest rates and boost borrowing.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 1:13 pm

So what if the bank paid you to take out a loan? That's what's happening in some European countries, where interest rates have gone negative amid efforts by central bankers to boost economic activity.

NPR's Audie Cornish spoke with NPR's John Ydstie about this unusual turn of financial events.

Audie Cornish: What's going on?

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Politics
4:26 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Presidential Candidates Move Away From Public Financing

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 6:45 pm

You can still check the box on your 1040 federal income tax return and earmark $3 for presidential public financing. This Watergate-era reform was supposed to push big money out of presidential politics, but so far this cycle, not many people have checked it.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Law
3:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Tulsa Reserve Cop Turns Himself In After Accidentally Killing Unarmed Suspect

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 6:45 pm

In Tulsa, Okla., a volunteer sheriff's deputy turned himself in Tuesday morning for manslaughter. The man says he accidentally discharged his handgun rather than his Taser in the course of an arrest, killing an unarmed suspect.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Commentary
3:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Letters: Russian Memes, Abraham Lincoln Assassination Anniversary

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 6:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
3:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

New York Mayor Announces Plan To Reduce Rikers Island Jail Population

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 6:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Author Interviews
4:40 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Take It From David Brooks: Career Success 'Doesn't Make You Happy'

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 10:38 am

The day after Japan surrendered in 1945, and World War II ended, singer Bing Crosby appeared on the radio program Command Performance. "Well it looks like this is it," he said. "What can you say at a time like this? You can't throw your skimmer in the air — that's for a run-of-the-mill holiday. I guess all anybody can do is thank God it's over."

New York Times columnist David Brooks cites this and other aspects of that 70-year-old radio program as evidence that America once marked triumph without boasting.

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Politics
4:40 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

After Years Of GOP Support, Cuban-Americans Become More Democratic

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 6:53 pm

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Guillermo Grenier, a sociology professor at Florida International University, about the likelihood that Cuban Americans will support a Republican candidate with a hard line towards softening U.S. relations with Cuba. He is leading a multi-year survey tracking the political attitudes of Cuban Americans.

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Television
3:56 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

How The South Korean Government Made K-Pop A Thing

Sun Hi (Megan Lee), Jodi (Louriza Tronco) and Corki (Erika Tham) star in Make It Pop.
Stephen Scott Nickelodeon

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 5:57 am

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Sports
3:56 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Jordan Spieth's Masters Win Signifies Bright Future For American Golf

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 6:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Technology
3:56 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

'Overly Attached Girlfriend' Meme Star Turns Online Fame Into Comedy Career

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 6:53 pm

Laina Morris is the real person behind the Internet meme known as the "Overly Attached Girlfriend." She has deftly exploited her Internet fame, turning a spoof entry to a Justin Bieber contest into a full-time career of putting comic videos on YouTube.

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Asia
3:56 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Chinese Women's Rights Activists Released From Jail

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 6:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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World
5:43 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

Murky Saudi Relationship Leaves Pakistan Conflicted On Yemen Conflict

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Author Interviews
4:52 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

From Harpies To Heroines: How Shakespeare's Women Evolved

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 5:43 pm

Tina Packer has spent a lifetime researching Shakespeare and his plays, both as an actress and as a director. And as she focused on the role that women play in his works, she noticed a progression.

Consider Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, one of his earliest plays, which centers on a man breaking a defiant woman's spirit. Strong-willed Kate is a harridan; her compliant sister, meanwhile, says things like, "Sir, to your pleasure humbly I subscribe."

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Music
4:52 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

Karen Haglof, No-Wave Guitarist Turned Doctor, Relaunches Music Career

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 5:43 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Science
4:52 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

No, Yes, Definitely: On The Rise Of 'No, Totally' As Linguistic Quirk

NPR

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 4:32 am

"Yep. Nope. Very definitely."

Kathryn Schulz, a writer for The New Yorker, heard that seemingly-contradictory response to a question recently. And once she started listening for it, she heard it everywhere: people agreeing by saying "No, totally," or "No, definitely," or "No, for sure."

In a recent article, Schulz digs into what's behind this linguistic quirk. She found out that the English language used to have more options than just "yes" and "no."

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Movies
5:19 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

Know That THX 'Sound' Before Movies? That's Actually 20,000 Lines Of Code

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 8:04 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

(SOUNDBITE OF ORIGINAL THX SOUND LOGO)

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Latin America
5:09 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

At Summit, All Eyes On Meeting Between Obama And Castro

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 8:04 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

Presidents Obama and Raul Castro of Cuba shook hands last night before opening ceremonies of the Summit of the Americas in Panama. But the informal meeting between the two men today was the most anticipated moment of the conference.

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Around the Nation
5:09 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

As Scott Family Reels From Police Shooting, Hundreds Turn Out For Funeral

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 8:04 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Law
5:23 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Police-Involved Shootings Highlight Problem With Law Enforcement 'Culture'

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 6:30 pm

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Seth Stoughton, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law, about his view that there needs to be a paradigm shift in policing away from the "warrior mindset" to a "guardian" role.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Shots - Health News
4:38 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Clam Cancer Spreads Along Eastern Seaboard

The blood cancer in soft-shell clams poses no risk to humans, but it does kill the shellfish.
Pat Wellenbach AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 7:50 am

Not every clam is, as the expression goes, happy as a clam. Even shellfish, it turns out, can get cancer. And it just might be that this cancer is spread from clam to clam by rogue cells bobbing through the ocean, scientists reported Thursday in the journal Cell.

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All Tech Considered
4:38 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Magic Mirror, At The Store, Should This Top Go In My Drawer?

Neiman Marcus is testing a digital "Memory Mirror" that lets shoppers see how an outfit looks in back as well as displaying items they've tried on side by side.
Courtesy of Neiman Marcus

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 6:30 pm

Spring: the time of year many people find themselves twirling in front of mirrors, trying on prom dresses, tuxedos or wedding gowns. Wouldn't it be nice to know how an outfit really looks from the back, instead of craning your neck, hoping to see what others see?

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World
4:38 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Removing Cuba From U.S. Terrorism List Would Be Mostly 'Symbolic'

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 6:30 pm

NPR's Audie Cornish talks about the history of how Cuba ended up on the state-sponsored terrorism list with William LeoGrande, professor of government at American University and co-author of the book Back Channel to Cuba: The Hidden History of Negotiations between Washington and Havana.

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Code Switch
9:16 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Civilians Can Record Police Encounters, But When Is It Interference?

Cellphones were used to record a 2012 confrontation between protesters and police in Springfield, Ill.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 1:50 pm

The arrest of South Carolina police Officer Michael Slager, who shot and killed Walter Scott in North Charleston this week, came shortly after the release of a cellphone video recorded by an eyewitness.

The filming of police by civilians has also sparked controversy, and it often causes confusion about what is legal.

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Code Switch
7:51 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Who Gets To Dance In 'Swan Lake'? The Answer Is Changing

Misty Copeland (left) and Brooklyn Mack play Odette/Odile and Prince Siegfried in this year's Washington Ballet production of Swan Lake. It is the first time that two black dancers star in Swan Lake in a major American production.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 10:47 am

Something rare is happening in the world of ballet: At the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., two African-American dancers will be the leads in The Washington Ballet's production of Swan Lake. Misty Copeland, soloist with American Ballet Theatre, will dance the dual role of Odette and Odile, while Brooklyn Mack of The Washington Ballet will dance Prince Siegfried.

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Around the Nation
4:58 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

On Welfare? Don't Use The Money For Movies, Say Kansas Lawmakers

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:09 pm

Welfare recipients in Kansas may soon be barred from spending their benefits on activities like going to the movies or swimming, or from withdrawing more than $25 per day from bank machines.

If Gov. Sam Brownback signs the bill, it will become one of the strictest welfare laws in the country. It's one of a number of such measures popping up in states that say they're trying to reduce fraud and get people off the welfare rolls. But opponents say the laws are mean-spirited and hurt the poor.

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