All Things Considered

Weekdays 4 -6 PM

On May 3, 1971, at 5 PM, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40+ years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

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However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish, and Sean Crawford.  In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, 4-5 PM. Arun Rath hosts on the weekends.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world, along with reports from WUIS and Illinois Public Radio journalists. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fatsis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne with The Week in Politics.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

 

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Environment
4:23 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

In California's Fourth Year Of Drought, New Regulations and $1 Billion In Relief

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 9:49 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Author Interviews
5:27 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

Thanks To Chance (And Craigslist), A Writer Becomes A Carpenter

131Pixfoto iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 2:22 pm

Nina MacLaughlin always knew she wanted to be a writer. She studied English and classics in college, and after graduation, she landed a great job with Boston's weekly alternative newspaper, the Boston Phoenix.

But after a few years of editing the newspaper's website, the drudgery began to hit her. It involved so much clicking, she says, and so many empty hours scrolling through the Internet. It didn't feel like how she wanted to spend her life.

And then came the low point: web producing a "listicle" of the world's "100 Unsexiest Men."

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World
5:27 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

After Students Went To Wage Jihad, Teacher Highlights Youth Radicalization

Lamya Kaddor teaches Islamic studies in Germany. She's written a new book, Zum Toeten Bereit (Ready To Kill), about the experience of having five former students flee to Syria to join jihadist groups.
Andre Zelck Courtesy of Piper Verlag GmbH

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 6:41 pm

Lamya Kaddor, a German-Syrian religious studies teacher and expert on Islam, was horrified to learn in 2013 that five of her former students had departed Germany to join jihadist groups in Syria.

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Music
5:27 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

'We Wanted To Entertain': Jon Spencer On 25 Years In New York

Jon Spencer Blues Explosion.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 7:21 pm

The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion's new album, Freedom Tower: No Wave Dance Party 2015, is all about New York City. As leader Jon Spencer explains, it was time to pay homage to the city the band has called home for almost 25 years, even though his love for the place is complicated.

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Code Switch
6:31 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

From Selma To Eisenhower, Trailblazing Black Reporter Was Always Probing

Ms. Payne interviewing a soldier from Chesapeake, Va., in Vietnam in 1967.
Courtesy of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center/Harper Collins

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 8:39 am

When Ethel Payne stood to ask President Dwight Eisenhower a question at a White House press conference in July 1954, women and African-Americans were rarities in the press corps. Payne was both, and wrote for The Chicago Defender, the legendary black newspaper that in the 40s and 50s, was read in black American households the way The New York Times was in white ones.

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Animals
5:47 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

Record Number Of Stranded Sea Lion Pups Strains California Resources

So far this month, more than 330 California sea lions have been admitted to the Marine Mammal Care Center at Fort MacArthur in San Pedro, Calif.
Nathan Rott NPR

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 6:58 pm

There are more than two dozen pens at the Marine Mammal Care Center in San Pedro, Calif., and no vacancy. They're filled with more than a hundred sea lion pups, grouped by health condition.

The pups in the first row of pens are swimming in small pools and sliding across the wet concrete.

"These guys on this half of the facility are actually doing pretty well," says Lauren Palmer, the chief biologist at the center. "They're eating on their own. They're playing. They're porpoising."

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Shots - Health News
4:12 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

Scientists Urge Temporary Moratorium On Human Genome Edits

Microbiologist Jennifer Doudna at the University of California, Berkeley. She's co-inventor of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology — a tool that's recently made the snipping and splicing of genes much easier.
Cailey Cotner UC Berkeley

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 6:58 pm

A new technology called CRISPR could allow scientists to alter the human genetic code for generations. That's causing some leading biologists and bioethicists to sound an alarm.

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Politics
3:55 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

Fourth-Graders Get Rough Lesson In Politics

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 6:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music
3:55 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

'Still The King': A Tribute To An Icon Of Western Swing

Ray Benson (center) and his band, the Grammy-winning country outfit Asleep at the Wheel, have long been stewards of the sound co-pioneered by Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys.
Lisa Pollard Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 7:20 pm

"The essence of the Bob Wills sound, and the reason he picked and did what he did, is that it was dance music — period."

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Sports
3:55 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

March Madness 2015: Winners And Losers

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 6:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asia
3:55 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

Renewed Fighting Creates Setback For Myanmar's Efforts To End Civil War

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 6:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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World
3:55 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

Adviser: Next 3 Months Crucial To Preventing Starvation On Vanuatu

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 5:47 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Television
3:55 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

In Move From Web To TV, 'Childrens Hospital' Could Set An Example

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 7:14 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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U.S.
7:19 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Exxon Settlement Falls Short Of Damage, N.J. Democrats Say

Bayway Refinery in Linden, N.J., is one of two refineries that are involved in the settlement. It's no longer owned by Exxon, but they are on the hook for the cleanup.
Joel Rose NPR

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 6:54 am

Lawmakers in New Jersey heard testimony today about one of the biggest environmental cases in that state's history.

ExxonMobil recently agreed to pay $225 million in damages for contamination at two oil refineries. Gov. Chris Christie called it a "good deal." But environmentalists complain the state is getting pennies on the dollar compared to the billions it was seeking in court.

The proposed settlement still requires approval by a state judge, and the public will have a chance to comment once the details are released — probably in the next few weeks.

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Parallels
6:50 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

In Tikrit Offensive, Local Sunnis, Shiite Militias Are Unlikely Allies

Shiite fighters and Sunni fighters, who have joined Shiite militia groups known collectively as Hashid Shaabi ("Popular Mobilization") to fight the Islamic State, gesture Tuesday next to former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's palaces in the Iraqi town of Ouja, near Tikrit.
Thaier Al-Sudani Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 11:53 am

The graying city mayor agrees to meet a few hours before he heads to the battlefront. He is haggard after living in exile since June, when the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, swept into his city — al-Sharqat, Iraq, a hour's drive north of Tikrit.

Ali Dodah al-Jabouri has a reason to fight: Islamic State militants killed his brother and 18 other relatives. But as part of a prominent Sunni Arab tribe, he is joining an unusual alliance with Iraqi Shiite militias backed and armed by Iran.

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Politics
4:01 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Analysis Reveals Record Number Of FOIA Requests Filed Last Year

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 7:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Parallels
4:00 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Why Russia's Economic Slump Has Been Good For London

The view west from London's newest skyscraper looks over the River Thames and St. Paul's Cathedral. Russians have flocked to the English property and banking sectors as the economy crumbles back home.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 2:29 am

One year ago, the U.S. and Europe started imposing sanctions against Russia to punish it for seizing part of Ukraine. At the time, many British analysts feared the sanctions would hurt London, because of England's close economic ties to Russia.

A year later, with Russia's economy in recession, London is thriving. And this may not be despite the crisis in Russia; London may be doing well partly because of Moscow's economic turmoil.

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Technology
4:00 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Apple Planning To Offer 'Skinny' TV Service, Reports Say

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 7:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It's All Politics
5:12 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Bad Blood Gets Worse Between Barack, Bibi And Israel

President Obama with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House in 2013. The two have never had a warm and fuzzy relationship.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 6:22 pm

The U.S.-Israeli relationship was one of the issues in the Israeli elections — in particular Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's poisonous personal relationship with President Obama.

Now, with Netanyahu's return to power, that relationship doesn't look like it will be improving anytime soon.

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Goats and Soda
5:07 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

How Malaria In The Brain Kills: Doctors Solve A Medical Mystery

The effects of malaria in the brain are clear: A healthy brain, right, has many grooves and crevices. But when the brain swells up, left, these crevices smooth out.
Courtesy of Michigan State University

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 11:16 am

Malaria is one of the oldest scourges of mankind. Yet it's been a mystery how the deadliest form of the disease kills children.

One doctor in Michigan has dedicated her life to figuring that out. Now she and her team report their findings in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The key to solving the mystery was looking inside the brain.

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U.S.
5:07 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Record Number Of Inmate Deaths Has Florida Prisons On The Defensive

Latandra Ellington, 36, was serving time for tax fraud at Lowell Correctional Institution when she died.
Florida Department of Corrections

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:27 pm

A record number of inmates – 346 people — died behind bars in Florida last year.

Most were from natural causes, but a series of suspicious deaths have raised questions about safety in the prisons. Federal and state law enforcement agencies are now investigating why so many inmates have been dying.

Latandra Ellington, 36, was serving time for tax fraud at Lowell Correctional Institution in central Florida when she died. Algarene Jennings, Ellington's aunt, believes she was murdered.

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Code Switch
7:18 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Old Land Battle Resurfaces In Georgia Between The Gullah And The Government

Hundreds of adult wood storks gather on the tops of trees at the Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge.
Stephen B. Morton AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 3:19 pm

More than 70 years ago, the federal government took land from descendants of West African slaves, known as the Gullah, living in Georgia. Now they're fighting to get it back.

In 1942, they were given just weeks to leave marsh property on the Georgia coast so that the U.S. military could construct an air base for training pilots and conducting anti-submarine flights. Twenty years later, the former base and the land around it were converted into the 2,762-acre Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge.

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Politics
5:53 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Secret Service Director Grilled About Agency Scandals In House Hearing

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 7:18 pm

Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy told the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security Tuesday that it took five days before he was informed that a car carrying two agents struck a security barrier outside the White House.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Code Switch
5:04 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Can New York Police Build Trust Among Public Housing Residents?

Reginald Britt first moved into the Taft Houses, a public housing complex in East Harlem, in 1976
Alexandra Starr

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 2:42 pm

In New York City, the police department has been re-examining the way it patrols public housing since the shooting of Akai Gurley late last year. Gurley, who was African-American, was unarmed when he was fatally shot by a rookie officer in a Brooklyn housing complex. His death highlighted tensions between police and the people who live in public housing.

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Books
5:04 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

The Long Road To 'Single, Carefree, Mellow'

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 7:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DON GONYEA, HOST:

We're going to spend some time now with writer Katherine Heiny. That profession is not something her family expected and, she says, in some ways, neither did she.

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Around the Nation
5:04 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Lost Camera Survives Two Years Submerged In Wyoming's Salt River

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 7:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now a story of lost and found. It was 2012. A man from Idaho went fishing on Wyoming's Salt River with his father.

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John Cassinelli says he and his dad were having a nice time.

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Economy
3:52 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

France, Germany, Italy Defy U.S. In Joining China-Led Development Bank

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 7:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
3:52 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock Resigns Amid Spending Scandal

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 7:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Book Reviews
3:52 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Book Review: 'The Discreet Hero'

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 7:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

Nobel Prize-winner Mario Vargas Llosa has just published a new novel. It's called "The Discrete Hero," and it's translated by Edith Grossman. The new title prompts our reviewer Alan Cheuse to make a confession.

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World
6:36 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Cyclone Created Almost 'Complete' Destruction In Vanuatu

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 7:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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