All Things Considered

Weekdays 4 -6 p.m.
Robert Siegel
Melissa Block

 In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  

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Politics
5:29 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Anticipating Attacks, GOP Campaigns Focus On Courting Women Voters

In this ad from Republican Stewart Mills, his wife Heather says he dons pink heels each year to raise money for victims of domestic violence.
YouTube

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 9:57 pm

At the Democratic party's annual Women's Leadership Forum Friday, Hillary Clinton delivered a message that could have come straight from the script being used by Democratic candidates all over the country.

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Book Reviews
4:27 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

For The Autumnal Equinox, A Poem As Chilling As The Fall Weather

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 5:08 pm

This time of year always reminds me of a wonderfully autumnal poem called "How to Like It," by Stephen Dobyns. Set in "the first days of fall," the poem describes a man whose summer seems long over: Old memories weigh on him, and new adventures feel just out of reach.

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Sports
4:13 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell: 'I Got It Wrong'

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 5:08 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

National Security
4:13 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Should The U.S. Pay Ransom For ISIS Hostages?

American Joshua Fattal was released in 2011 from Iran after the Sultan of Oman paid more than $400,000 in ransom. He now says the U.S. should bail its citizens out abroad.
Mohammed Mahjoub AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 5:08 pm

It was three years ago that Joshua Fattal tasted freedom again. Fattal was one of three Americans who were seized as they hiked in Iraqi Kurdistan near the Iranian border. He was held for 26 months by the Tehran government, charged with spying. His release came as then-Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad came to the United States.

"I was released while Ahmadinejad was visiting the U.N. for the U.N. General Assembly, and it was really just a publicity stunt and I could tell what they were doing was a response to pressure," says Fattal.

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Europe
3:30 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

British Ambassador To U.S. Says Scottish Vote Is 'Decisive'

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 5:08 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
3:27 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

'American Cornball' A Taxonomy Of Humor In The U.S.

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 5:08 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
3:16 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

United Kingdom Remains Intact But Not Unchanged

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 5:08 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
6:02 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

A Frightening Curve: How Fast Is The Ebola Outbreak Growing?

Source: Columbia Prediction of Infectious Diseases, World Health Organization Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 12:07 am

In the past week, world leaders have started using a mathematical term when they talk about the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

"It's spreading and growing exponentially," President Obama said Tuesday. "This is a disease outbreak that is advancing in an exponential fashion," said Dr. David Nabarro, who is heading the U.N.'s effort against Ebola.

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Goats and Soda
5:49 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

In Sierra Leone, A Lockdown ... Or A Time To Reflect?

A woman washes clothes in a slum in Freetown.
Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images

Starting just after midnight, residents of Sierra Leone will be confined to their homes for a three-day lockdown.

It's the latest government plan meant to stem the tide of Ebola cases, which exceeded 1,500 last week in Sierra Leone.

But the plan has not won the support of the international medical community — and is causing concern among Sierra Leoneans as well.

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Cities Project
4:49 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

A Coastal Paradise Confronts Its Watery Future

Half the land in the city of Satellite Beach is only 6 feet above the waterline.
Jon Hamilton NPR

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 5:59 pm

Dan Reiter, 37, is a long-board surfer and contractor who used to live in Tampa, Fla. Then he discovered the surf breaks along a stretch of coast south of Cape Canaveral. "It's one of the most beautiful places in the world to live and surf and raise your kids," says Reiter, 37, as we watch head-high waves roll into Hightower Beach.

But there's trouble in this coastal paradise. It's on a low-lying barrier island that's getting lower as sea level rises. So the cities here are looking for ways to keep the water at bay or retreat from it.

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Sports
3:58 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Fans Call On NFL To Address Domestic Violence Issues

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 5:49 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Iraq
3:58 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Kurds: U.S. Fight Against ISIS Requires Ground Forces

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 5:49 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Kurds of Northern Iraq rushed units of their militia, the Peshmerga, those who face death, to oppose the advance of the Jihadist group that now calls itself the Islamic State.

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Middle East
3:58 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Islamic State Fight Will Take Time, Diplomacy

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 5:49 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book Reviews
5:03 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

Martin Amis' 'Zone Of Interest' Is An Electrically Powerful Holocaust Novel

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 5:48 pm

When I picked up Martin Amis' new novel, The Zone of Interest, it felt as though I had touched a third rail, so powerful and electric is the experience of reading it. After years of playing the snide card and giving his great store of talents to the business of giving other people the business, Amis has turned again to the matter of Nazi horrors (he tried to deal with it in a gimmicky way in his 1991 novel Time's Arrow), and the result is a book that may stand for years as the triumph of his career.

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The Salt
4:20 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

Diet Soda May Alter Our Gut Microbes And Raise The Risk Of Diabetes

Should we drink diet soda or not? The latest study doesn't really clear things up.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 4:29 am

The debate over whether diet sodas are good, bad or just OK for us never seems to end.

Some research suggests zero-calorie drinks can help people cut calories and fend off weight gain.

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Goats and Soda
4:20 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

The Insights Of An Ebola Doctor Who Became A Patient

Ebola survivor Dr. Kent Brantly and his wife, Amber, leave a news conference after his release from Emory University Hospital on Aug. 21.
John Bazemore AP

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 5:19 pm

He had cared for Ebola patients. He himself caught the virus. Only then, said Dr. Kent Brantly, did he fully grasp the awful nature of this disease.

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U.S.
4:20 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

House Approves Bill To Train, Arm Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 5:03 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
4:33 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

The Kaypro II: An Early Computer With A Writer's Heart

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 5:45 pm

Commentator Andrei Codrescu remembers the first word processor he had — the Kaypro II in the 1980s. Its inventor, Andrew Kay, died Aug. 28, at the age of 95. The Kaypro II weighed in at a mere 26 pounds and was a favorite of early computer aficionados.

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Politics
4:33 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Rep. Gowdy To Lead New Benghazi Committee In First Public Hearing

Gowdy questions a witness during a May 2013 House committee hearing on Benghazi.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 6:21 pm

The Sept. 11 attacks two years ago on an outpost in Benghazi, Libya, will get a fresh look by House lawmakers Wednesday. The attacks took the lives of four Americans including a U.S. ambassador.

It will be the first public hearing since Speaker John Boehner announced the formation of the Select Committee on Benghazi and named Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., the chairman in May.

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Economy
4:33 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

A 'Circle' Of Support Helps Families Stay Out Of Poverty

Cara Russo of Gettysburg, Pa., here with 9-year-old Shayla, one of her two daughters, has found success in a program geared to help struggling families navigate past some of the day-to-day obstacles that keep many poor.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 6:14 pm

Go around the country and you'll hear lots of frustration about just how difficult it is to get out of poverty — and more importantly, how to stay out. The official U.S. poverty rate may have gone down to 14.5 percent in 2013 according to new numbers out Tuesday, but still more than 45 million were poor.

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Sports
3:32 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Vikings Allow Adrian Peterson Back Without Suspension

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:33 pm

Melissa Block talks with Minneapolis Star Tribune sports columnist Chip Scoggins about how Minnesota is reacting to the Vikings decision to allow running back Adrian Peterson to play after admitting to hitting his 4 year old with a switch.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Global Health
3:19 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Ebola Outbreak Presents Special Challenges For U.S. Military

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:33 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Global Health
3:19 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

American Doctor In Libera Calls U.S. Ebola Response Plan 'Outstanding'

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:33 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
4:11 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Medals Of Honor Recognize Harrowing Battle And A Dying Act

Army Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins receives the Medal of Honor during a ceremony at the White House. He describes the battle that earned him the medal as the toughest he saw in three tours of duty in Vietnam.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 8:43 am

President Obama on Monday awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor, to two soldiers who served in Vietnam: Army Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie Adkins, who survived a harrowing battle and 18 body wounds; and Army Spc. 4 Donald P. Sloat, whose dying act saved his fellow soldiers.

In January 1970, President Obama said Monday, Sloat was on patrol with his squad in Vietnam.

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Parallels
4:11 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Iraq's Artists Defy Extremists With Bows, Brushes And A Low Profile

The Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra performs in Baghdad. The concert was promoted by word of mouth to avoid being targeted by bombs.
Graham Smith NPR

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 6:00 pm

It's a hot night in Baghdad, and the national theater is packed with people who are here to see the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra.

They're fanning themselves with programs that show conductor Karim Wasfi, a striking man with thick eyebrows and a pointed beard, playing the cello. Tonight, he'll be conducting for the first time in more than a year.

Iraq has been in the headlines lately, with extremists taking over parts of the country, American airstrikes, the militias and the politics.

But the country was once a sophisticated center for learning and the arts.

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Business
4:11 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

With Turmoil Roiling Abroad, Why Aren't Oil Prices Bubbling Up?

A soldier guards a pipe en route to the Kawergosk Refinery near Irbil, the capital of the autonomous Kurdish region of northern Iraq, in July. Fighting in northern Iraq forced the closure of the country's largest oil refinery, Baiji, and cut production from the Kirkuk oil field this summer.
Safin Hamed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 7:32 am

The price of oil has been falling — a drop that you may already have noticed at the pump. Gasoline prices have dropped noticeably since June, and oil is now well below $100 a barrel.

That decline has happened even as conflicts have flared in or near oil-producing regions. Normally, oil prices are expected to spike higher amid turmoil — so why have they been trending lower?

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Code Switch
3:34 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Alain Locke, Whose Ashes Were Found In University Archives, Is Buried

Alain Locke is buried at the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. He lies near many of the nation's early congressmen and next to the first director of the Smithsonian's Museum of African Art.
Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 9:02 am

Inside the cemetery, beneath the stained glass, the chapel is full. Mourners line the walls and spill out the door into the rainy day.

About 150 people are gathered for the funeral of a man who died 60 years ago.

Author and philosopher Alain Locke is widely known as the father of the Harlem Renaissance. He inspired Martin Luther King Jr., who praised him as an intellectual leader on par with Plato and Aristotle.

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Global Health
3:34 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Could Ebola Become As Contagious As The Flu?

Medical workers at the John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Monrovia, Liberia, put on their protective suits before going to the high-risk area of the hospital, where Ebola patients are being treated, Sept. 3.
Dominique Faget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:10 pm

Back in August, scientists reported that the Ebola virus is mutating during this epidemic.

When a virus spreads between people and reproduces, it copies its genetic code in a sloppy way. So there can be unpredictable changes.

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Africa
3:34 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Egypt Stamps Wrong Canal On Its Postage

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 4:11 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Media
5:29 pm
Sun September 14, 2014

How Should The Media Handle Beheading Videos?

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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