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NPR Story
3:39 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

White House Releases Long-Awaited Rules On Mental Health

The mental health parity law passed in 2008, but it didn't cover people in smaller health plans.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 1:35 pm

The Obama administration delivered on a long-delayed health care promise when it issued rules to ensure equal health insurance treatment for people who have problems with mental health or need treatment for substance abuse.

The rules, issued Friday, require that most health insurance plans offer the same amount of coverage for mental health and substance abuse claims as they do for medical and surgical coverage.

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Music Interviews
3:39 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

¡Aparato! Takes Latin Music Traditions Into The Future

¡Aparato! is a Los Angeles trio that fuses rock with sounds and instruments from Mexico's son jarocho tradition.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 7:08 pm

All this week, All Things Considered has been broadcasting from Southern California, a hotbed for Latin Alternative music. Felix Contreras, co-host of NPR's Alt.Latino podcast, says that even for him, that music often evades definition.

"Latin Alternative is a combination of tradition mixed with hip-hop and rock and electronica. But then sometimes it's just straight hip-hop, and that throws my theory into shambles," he says. "It's all of the above, but none of the above."

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Parallels
3:36 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

France Rethinks The Sanctity Of Its Day Of Rest

A woman walks amid both open and closed shops during a Sunday morning stroll at the Butte Montmartre in Paris, in July. Under France's Byzantine rules on Sunday trading, shops at the top of the hill are in a designated tourist area and so can open, but those at the bottom cannot.
Christian Hartmann Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 7:34 pm

There's a fight going on for the soul of France. Since 1906, Sunday has been deemed a collective day of rest in the country, and French law only allows stores to open on Sundays under very specific conditions — for example, if they're in a high tourist area. Sunday work is also tightly controlled.

But some people are questioning the sense of such a tradition in a languishing economy and 24/7 world.

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The Salt
3:32 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Can We Eat Our Way To A Healthier Microbiome? It's Complicated

While no one's sure which foods are good for our microbiomes, eating more veggies can't hurt.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 9:27 am

When our colleague Rob Stein got his microbiome analyzed recently in the name of science journalism, we were totally fascinated.

As Stein noted, it may be possible to cultivate a healthier community of bacteria on and inside us by modifying our diets.

Stein was advised to eat more garlic and leeks for his. But we wondered: Are there other foods that promote a healthy microbiome in most people?

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The Two-Way
3:06 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Mental Health Moves Closer To Parity In New Insurance Rules

Former Rep. Patrick Kennedy (left) is welcomed by Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, during a hearing about mental health parity rules Thursday. A new rule issued by the Obama administration aims to increase parity for how insurers handle mental health issues.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 7:28 pm

Many health insurers must treat coverage of mental health and substance abuse in the same way they handle treatments for physical illness, according to a new rule issued Friday by the Obama administration.

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

A Doctor's Prescription To Play Outside

Melody Salhudin hits the swings during a break from her walk. (Martha Bebinger/WBUR)

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 3:27 pm

In an era of childhood obesity, exercise might be one of the best things a doctor could prescribe. So why not do that?

Leaders at one of country’s oldest outdoor organizations — the Appalachian Mountain Club — brought that question to pediatricians at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

FDA Moves To Declare Trans Fats 'Unsafe'

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 3:27 pm

The Food and Drug Administration wants to get rid of trans fats in processed foods, such as donuts, frozen pizza and margarine.

The agency now classifies trans fats as “generally recognized as safe,” but the proposed rules would withdraw that status.

Trans fats have been shown to be a contributor to heart disease, and a dozen or so localities across the country have already banned trans fats from restaurants.

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

CBS Apologizes For ‘60 Minutes’ Benghazi Story

Lara Logan apologizes on CBS This Morning for her "60 Minutes" report on Benghazi. (CBS screenshot)

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 12:56 pm

CBS made a highly unusual apology this morning, for its Oct. 27 “60 Minutes” report on the 2012 attack on the U.S. compound in Benghazi, Libya.

In the segment, CBS correspondent Lara Logan interviewed a former security officer whose credibility has since been undermined by revelations he gave a different account of the attack to the FBI.

NPR’s media correspondent David Folkenflick joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain the story and its implications.

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Mountain Stage
2:47 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Andrew Walesch On Mountain Stage

Andrew Walesch (left) performs live on Mountain Stage with guitarist Jonathan Brown.
Josh Saul Mountain Stage

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 8:38 am

Andrew Walesch makes his first appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of the North House Folk School in Grand Marais, Minn. An in-demand singer and pianist, Walesch has earned fans across the Midwest, one jazz club and piano bar at a time.

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World Cafe
2:40 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros On World Cafe

Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros.
Myles Pettengill Courtesy of the artist

Since the moment they came together, Alex Ebert and his band Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros have had a reputation for electrifying, unifying live shows. The group has been a crowd-pleasing hitmaker since the release of its 2009 debut album, Up From Below, which features the modern classic "Home."

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All Tech Considered
2:11 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Tech Week: Twitter Takes Off, Audie Cornish In Silicon Valley

Will It Fly? The Twitter logo decorated a post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday.
Richard Drew AP

It's time for our Friday round-up of the tech and culture stories from NPR and beyond. Here we go ...

ICYMI

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The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Philadelphians Elect First Whig Since 19th Century

Robert "Heshy" Bucholz is seen in an undated photo provided by Bucholz. A member of the Modern Whig party, Bucholz campaigned door to door and beat his Democratic opponent 36-24 to earn a four-year term as an election judge in Philadelphia's Rhawnhurst section.
AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 3:46 pm

After winning an election on a platform of pragmatism and compromise, Robert "Heshy" Bucholz, 39, is set to become what many believe will be the first Whig to hold elected office in Philadelphia since before the Civil War. A member of the upstart Modern Whig Party, Bucholz won the post of judge of elections in one of the city's wards.

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Live in Concert
1:31 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Marijuana Deathsquads, Live In Concert

Marijuana Deathsquads performing live at the 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C.
NPR Music

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 10:05 am

The Minneapolis-based noise-rock band Marijuana Deathsquads has a name that implies mind-altering chaos. And that's largely what you get in the group's live performances - a thrilling, relentless bombardment of sight and sound. For this concert, originally webcast live on Nov. 6, 2013, the group's members were lost in a flickering shower of lights while blasting their way through highlights from its latest album, Oh My Sexy Lord.

Set List:

  • HAL
  • Untitled
  • Wave
  • Untitled
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The Two-Way
1:14 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

House Lawmakers Seek Federal Probe Of Black Lung Program

Two Democratic congressmen have formally asked the Labor Department's Inspector General to investigate "allegations of misconduct by doctors and lawyers working on behalf of the coal industry" and their roles in the denials of benefits for coal miners stricken with black lung disease.

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All Songs Considered
1:02 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

The Good Listener: The Right And Wrong Way To Go Solo

George Michael (left) and Andrew Ridgeley both went solo after Wham! broke up. One fared just a little better than the other.
Brian Aris

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
12:57 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Anat Cohen on Piano Jazz

Anat Cohen.
Jimmy Katz

Israel-born clarinetist and saxophonist Anat Cohen joins Marian McPartland, along with bassist Gary Mazzaroppi and drummer Glenn Davis, for a quartet edition of Piano Jazz.

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It's All Politics
12:50 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

California Congressman Wakes Up To Tough Re-Election Fight

Rep. Mike Honda speaks during the Fremont Legislative Brunch at Tesla Motors in California in May.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 5:49 pm

As a general workplace rule, it's never a good idea to fall asleep on the job. That's especially true if you're a member of Congress.

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Monkey See
12:10 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Sisters And Brothers And A Holiday TV Quiz

NPR

This week's show, featuring a visit from our pal Kat Chow, kicks off with a Thor-inspired discussion of the sometimes fraught world of sibling relationships. We talk about where we come from in our own sibling worlds, and then check in with fictional siblings and real-world siblings. (Stephen has concerns regarding the Jonas Brothers.)

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The Two-Way
12:06 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Toronto Mayor Advised To 'Go Away For A Couple Of Weeks'

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford on Thursday.
Mark Blinch Reuters/Landov

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, who this week has admitted to smoking crack and to being "extremely inebriated" when he was videotaped dropping F-bombs and threatening to kill someone, needs to go away for "a couple of weeks," his brother said Friday.

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It's All Politics
11:59 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Presidential Apologies: Regrets, They Have A Few

President Obama walks from the White House to Marine One on Friday. In an interview Thursday with NBC News, he apologized for breaking a promise regarding the Affordable Care Act.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:31 pm

Now that President Obama has apologized to those who've seen their health care plans canceled due to the Affordable Care Act, losses he pledged beforehand wouldn't happen, he joins the line of modern presidents who have had to look the American people in the eye and give their regrets.

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Business
11:59 am
Fri November 8, 2013

What Really Got Measured In This Month's Jobs Report?

Graphic designer Tom Sadowski, 65, works from home in Sterling, Va., in October. Many experts believe the economy is becoming too complicated for the Bureau of Labor Statistics to measure accurately using current methods.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:58 pm

In October, private employers did a lot of hiring, but a government shutdown forced hundreds of thousands of workers to stay home.

Those federal furloughs offset 204,000 jobs created last month — enough to push the unemployment rate one tick higher to 7.3 percent, the Labor Department said on Friday.

Or maybe the end of that sentence should read: the Labor Department guessed on Friday.

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Shots - Health News
11:34 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Polio In The Middle East And Africa Could Threaten Europe

A doctor vaccinates a child against polio at a health clinic in Damascus, Syria, on Nov. 6. To stop the disease from spreading beyond Syria, health officials plan to vaccinate 20 million children in the region.
Youssef Badawi EPA /LANDOV

Polio outbreaks in the Middle East and Africa could spread to Europe if precautions aren't taken, researchers say.

The recent discovery of the poliovirus in Syria, Somalia and Israel should be a wake-up call for European health officials, according to epidemiologist Martin Eichner at the University of Tuebingen in Germany.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Fri November 8, 2013

How Tall Is The Washington Monument? Surveyors Take To The Top

National Geodetic Survey crew members Roy Anderson, left, and Steve Breidenbach set up survey equipment used to measure the height of the Washington Monument.
National Geodetic Survey/NOAA

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 12:23 pm

The National Geodetic Survey doesn't often get the opportunity to take detailed measurements of the massive stone obelisk that sits in the middle of Washington, D.C.

But a 2011 earthquake in nearby Mineral, Va., damaged the Washington Monument enough that to repair it, the tower had to be wrapped in scaffolding. That gave surveyors access to the very top of the structure.

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Animals
11:30 am
Fri November 8, 2013

The Myth of the Woolly Bear

Legend holds that the length of a woolly bear caterpillar's color bands can be used to forecast how severe the winter weather will be. The myth dates back to colonial American folklore but was popularized by a 1948 study. SciFri finds out if there's any truth to the lore, and what the caterpillar's fuzzy bristles are really used for.

Science
11:29 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Biosecurity for the Age of Redesigned Life

Forget dissecting frogs and building potato batteries. High school students today are learning genetic engineering--and some are even redesigning life. Bioethicists and the FBI have taken note and are rethinking biosecurity for the synthetic biology revolution.

Your Health
11:29 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Navigating Dietary Supplement Regulations

Echinacea, vitamins, and other dietary supplements have become a $5 billion industry, but the products don't need to be pre-approved by the FDA before they go on the market. How do we know what is really in our supplements? What regulations are currently in place? How can we keep ourselves safe and informed?

Space
11:29 am
Fri November 8, 2013

India and NASA Home In on Mars

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Zero plus one, two, three, four...

(APPLAUSE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: Liftoff.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #3: Liftoff normal.

(APPLAUSE)

JOHN DANKOSKY, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:26 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Poet Pablo Neruda Was Not Poisoned, Officials In Chile Say

Chilean writer and diplomat Pablo Neruda died from prostate cancer, not poison, officials say. He was serving as Chile's ambassador to France in 1971 when he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature.
STF AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:57 pm

It was prostate cancer, not an assassin's poison, that killed poet Pablo Neruda, officials in Chile announced Friday. The Nobel laureate's body was exhumed for testing this spring, due to claims from an employee and Neruda's family that the Chilean poet had been murdered at age 69.

From The Santiago Times:

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Barbershop
11:11 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Should Jonathan Martin 'Man Up' Or 'Leave It On The Field?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Arts & Life
11:11 am
Fri November 8, 2013

St. Louis Master: 'Diversity Is Big In Chess'

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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