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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Texans Call For Boycott Of Retailers That Fought Wage Bill

In Texas, back-to-school shoppers are being urged to boycott Macy's and Kroger stores for their efforts to quash a wage fairness bill. In this file photo, a man shops at a Sears store in Fort Worth.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:56 pm

A group is calling on back-to-school shoppers to boycott Macy's and Kroger stores in Texas this weekend, in retaliation for the national retailers' efforts to quash a bill that would have strengthened the state's wage discrimination law.

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Interviews
10:54 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Mike White On Creating HBO's 'Enlightened' Whistle-Blower

In HBO's Enlightened, Laura Dern stars as corporate executive Amy Jellicoe, who returns from a post-meltdown retreat to pick up the pieces of her broken life. Series creator Mike White stars as Tyler, Amy's friend and co-worker.
Lacey Terrell HBO

This interview was originally broadcast on March 04, 2013.

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Television
10:54 am
Fri August 9, 2013

A 'Curb'-Like Comedy And The Return Of 'Breaking Bad'

Before the midseason break, Breaking Bad's Walter White (Bryan Cranston) had stashed away plenty of drug money, but may have inadvertently tipped off his DEA agent brother-in-law.
Ursula Coyote AMC

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 12:55 pm

This weekend, the AMC cable network begins showing the final episodes of its acclaimed drama series Breaking Bad, and launches a new one: Low Winter Sun. Meanwhile, HBO presents its newest made-for-TV movie — this one a comedy, starring and co-written by Larry David.

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The Salt
10:52 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Why Picking Your Berries For $8,000 A Year Hurts A Lot

A Triqui Mexican picks strawberries at a farm in Washington state.
Courtesy of Seth Holmes

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 9:55 am

As the supply chain that delivers our food to us gets longer and more complicated, many consumers want to understand — and control — where their food comes from.

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Movie Interviews
10:46 am
Fri August 9, 2013

'The Butler': 'It's Not A Movie — It's A Movement'

Forest Whitaker stars in The Butler, loosely based on the life of Eugene Allen.
Anne Marie Fox The Weinsten Co.

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 6:03 pm

Lee Daniels has directed critically acclaimed films that deal with difficult subject matter before, but he says working on The Butler was "the hardest thing he's ever done."

The film chronicles the life of a man who rose from the cotton fields of North Carolina to work in the White House, witnessing some of the most important moments in this nation's history.

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Around the Nation
10:46 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Uncomfortable In America, Young Immigrant Says Goodbye

Tiffanie Drayton's mother moved her family to the U-S for a better life. But it wasn't all it was cracked up to be. Now back in her native Trinidad, Drayton tells host Michel Martin what inspired her to share her story in the Salon piece 'Goodbye to my American Dream.' Byline: Michel Martin

Barbershop
10:46 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Is Obama Snubbing Russia?

Was President Obama's cancelled meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin a silly snub or smart diplomatic strategy? The Barbershop guys offer a fresh cut on the week's news.

Barbershop
10:46 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Maj. Nidal Hasan: A Murderer or Martyr ?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program today, we'll talk about immigration, but not in the way you might expect. Most often, we seem to hear about immigrants who are desperate to stay in the U.S. Later, we'll hear from a woman who said life was not what she'd hoped for here, so she packed up and went back to Trinidad. We'll hear from her in just a few minutes. But we are going to start the program today with a visit to the Barbershop.

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Music News
10:02 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Remembering The People's Throat Singer Of Tuva

Kongar-Ol Ondar at the 72nd Annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles. Genghis Blues was nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary Short.
Scott Nelson Getty Images.

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 10:57 am

The technique known as throat singing is an ancient style still practiced in Tuva, a small republic between Siberia and Mongolia's Gobi desert. Traditionally, it was practiced by herders.

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The Two-Way
9:32 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Father And Son Coaxed From Jungle 40 Years After Vietnam War

Ho Van Lang, found in the jungle of central Vietnam 40 years after he and his father fled the war.
VTV2

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:55 pm

Four decades ago, Ho Van Thanh fled the fighting in his native Vietnam, disappearing into the jungle with his infant son, Ho Van Lang. This week, father and son emerged for the first time — an enfeebled Thanh carried in a stretcher, and Lang wearing only a loincloth made of tree bark.

According to the Vietnamese newspaper Dan Tri, Ho Van Thanh, now 82, was last seen in 1973 running into the jungle, after his wife and two other children were killed by a bomb or land mine near his home.

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Business
9:28 am
Fri August 9, 2013

UBS To Pay $120 Million In Lehman Brothers Dispute

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with more fallout from the financial crisis.

Swiss banking giant UBS has agreed to pay $120 million to settle a lawsuit by investors. The case goes back to 2007. Investors say they were misled about the health of the financial firm Lehmann Brothers when UBS was selling them investments linked to Lehmann's debt. Lehmann collapsed into bankruptcy in September 2008. The settlement resolves claims of about $1 billion. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
9:23 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Moving On, And Up: Brian Banks, 27, Plays As NFL Rookie

Atlanta Falcons linebacker Brian Banks made his NFL debut in a preseason game Thursday night, more than 10 years after he was sent to prison for a crime of which he was later exonerated.
John Bazemore AP

"You're up next."

Those three words are what any athlete longs to hear. For linebacker Brian Banks, it took more than 10 years for that sentence to be addressed to him by an NFL coach. When he heard it in a preseason game Thursday night, Banks got a taste of the life he once dreamed of — before he became a convicted felon and lost his chance to go to college, and was finally exonerated.

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Shots - Health News
9:19 am
Fri August 9, 2013

'Aetna, I'm Glad I Met Ya!' — On Twitter

Evidently, an old insurer can learn new tricks.
Bob Child AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:12 am

A few weeks back, Sharon Roberts, who had been diagnosed with endometrial cancer last year, tweeted:

@teachdance11: the BRCA gene test is 2 parts. Aetna paid $300 part. Not the $7000 part. Gotta be rich to be in the know

The 55-year-old teacher in Houston was surprised when @aetnahelp, a Twitter account created for customer assistance by the insurance company Aetna, quickly responded.

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The Two-Way
9:10 am
Fri August 9, 2013

I Just Killed My Wife, Miami Man's Facebook Page Says

Derek Medina in a booking photo taken by the Miami-Dade Police Department.
handout Reuters /Landov

"I'm going to prison or death sentence for killing my wife. Love you guys. Miss you guys. Take care. Facebook people you'll see me in the news."

The Miami Herald and other news outlets are reporting that 31-year-old Derek Medina of South Miami apparently posted that Facebook message Thursday morning, along with a photo of a woman's "twisted, bloodied body lying on a linoleum floor."

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Shots - Health News
8:22 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Camels May Be A Source Of The Middle East Coronavirus

A dromedary camel waits for a tourist to hop on its back in Petra, Jordan. The country has recorded two cases of the Middle East respiratory syndrome.
Chris Jackson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:56 am

Looks like Arabian camels might be hiding more than just fat in those furry humps.

Scientists have found evidence that dromedary camels — the ones with just one hump — may be carriers of the lethal coronavirus in the Middle East, which has infected at least 94 people and killed 46 since first appearing in Saudi Arabia last year.

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The Two-Way
8:21 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Verdict Today? Wait Continues At Trial Of 'Whitey' Bulger

A courtroom sketch of James "Whitey" Bulger (left) and defense attorney J.W. Carney, Jr.
Margaret Small AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 8:28 am

It's Day 4 of jury deliberations in the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger, the now-83-year-old Boston gangster who is accused of 19 murders and racketeering.

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The Two-Way
8:12 am
Fri August 9, 2013

West Coast Kidnap Suspect May Have Explosives, Police Warn

A sign for missing California teenager Hannah Anderson hangs on a fence at El Capitan High School in the Lakeside neighborhood of San Diego County.
Sam Hodgson Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 1:50 pm

Update At 2:40 p.m. ET: Sheriff: Car Recovered

San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore said Friday that the car belonging to the suspect has been found near Cascade, Idaho. He said the license plate had been removed, but the Vehicle Identification Number, or VIN, showed a match as belonging to James Lee DiMaggio.

Gore said that horseback riders in the mountains northeast of Boise believe they saw DiMaggio, who is suspected of killing Christina Anderson and abducted at least one of her children.

Here's our earlier post:

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All Tech Considered
7:52 am
Fri August 9, 2013

The Sheryl Sandberg Effect: Rise Of Female COOs

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, in 2008.
Dan Farber via Flickr

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:34 pm

As part of our reboot of All Tech Considered, we've been inviting contributors to blog about big-picture questions facing tech and society. One theme we're exploring is the lack of women and people of color in tech — a gap so glaring that ridiculously long lines at tech conferences have inspired photo essays and Twitter feeds.

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Shots - Health News
7:41 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Swallowing Tiny Magnets Can Lead To Big Trouble For Kids

There's only one way to know if magnets and kids attract: with an x-ray.
Julie Brown/Seattle Children"s Hospital

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:56 am

About five years ago, emergency room doctor Julie Brown met an 8-year-old girl who complained about a weeklong stomach ache. The girl was tight-lipped about what might be causing the pain, and she ended up visiting the Seattle Children's Hospital, where Brown works, twice. And then a third time.

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The Two-Way
6:28 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Powerball Jackpot Winners Include 16 N.J. County Workers

Paul White of Ham Lake, Minn., and his partner Kim VanReese. White bought one of the three winning tickets in Wednesday's $448.4 million Powerball lottery. While one-third of the jackpot is about $149.4 million, he's chosen to take his share in a lump sum rather than spread out over many years. That lump sum is $86 million, which after taxes will be about $58 million.
Eric Miller Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 8:03 am

One of the three tickets that ended up being winners of Wednesday's $448.4 million Powerball jackpot belongs to a group of 16 workers at the Ocean County Vehicle Maintenance Department in New Jersey, according to local news outlets.

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The Two-Way
5:55 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Book News: Barbara Mertz, Mystery Novelist Of Many Names, Dies

Author Barbara Mertz died Thursday morning, Aug. 8, 2013, at her home in Frederick, Maryland.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
5:47 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Kansas City Sandwich Is A 'Hit' With Baseball Teams

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Oklahoma Joe's barbecue is a popular spot in Kansas City - especially known for its Z-Man sandwich - smoked brisket with provolone topped with onion rings. The Minnesota Twins must've gotten the memo. They ordered 50 Z-Mans on Tuesday, and went on to beat the hometown Royals in a blowout.

The Two-Way
5:40 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Obama Set For News Conference Friday Afternoon

President Obama at the White House on Thursday.
Kevin Dietsch UPI /Landov

President Obama is set to hold a news conference at the White House on Friday at 3 p.m. ET — his first such formal give-and-take with the press corps since "NSA leaker" Edward Snowden starting spilling secrets about National Security Agency surveillance programs in June.

So we should expect questions about Snowden, spying and civil liberties, as well as strained relations with Russia, the economy and other subjects.

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Around the Nation
5:38 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Michigan Family Welcomes 12th Child

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer, with an announcement. Michiganders Jay and Teri Schwandt just had their 12th child, and it's a boy, just like his 11 brothers. Little Tucker was nine days late, so they thought he might be a girl - not happening.

Must be a family thing. Teri's sister has 10 children, and they are all boys. Will they try again for lucky 13? We will never close that door, says Teri.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Digital Life
4:22 am
Fri August 9, 2013

New Digital Amber Alerts Could Create A Backlash

Amber Alerts were issued as cellphone text messages in California this week.
NPR

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:20 pm

A couple of nights ago I had just closed my book, turned off my light, and was drifting off to sleep when my cellphone started to shriek. I shot awake and groped for the phone. My sleep-befuddled brain was greeted with this message: "Boulevard, CA Amber Alert update." Then there was a license plate number, and a make and model of the car.

Groggily, I Google this town — Boulevard, Calif. — and discovered it was 541 miles away from my house. That's more than the distance between Washington, D.C., and Detroit. I was mystified. Why was I getting this?

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NPR Story
3:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Astronaut Among Presidential Medal Of Freedom Winners

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Astronaut Sally Ride has served as a role model for many young women as the first American woman in space. That's one of the reasons why she's one of the 16 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Ride is being honored posthumously - she died last year at the age of 61. The White House in a statement said: Sally Ride stood up for racial and gender equality in the classroom and taught students that there are no limits to what they can accomplish.

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NPR Story
3:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Feds Probe If Student Athletes Were Biogenesis Clients

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Major League baseball, this week, sanctioned a number of players, including New York Yankee Alex Rodriguez. They're accused of receiving performance enhancing drugs from a Miami clinic called Biogenesis.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And according to ESPN and other organizations, that clinic also saw high school athletes. Parents have told the sports network they don't know why their children were listed in the clinics records. The lawyer for the owner of Biogenesis declined to comment to ESPN and has not returned calls from NPR.

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NPR Story
3:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Lawlessness Increases In Libya

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And just preserving some semblance of order is the big challenge in neighboring Libya. That country's long-time dictator, Muammar Gaddafi was toppled from power two years ago and now the future of Libya as even a functioning state is in question. There has been increased lawlessness in that country. The militias that ousted Muammar Gaddafi are fighting with each other. A thousand inmates escaped in a prison break and there are assassinations of activists and police.

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Parallels
2:08 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Unease In Sprawling Rio Slum Ahead Of Police 'Pacification'

A police officer patrols the rooftop of a school at the Rocinha slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sept. 20, 2012, where a "pacification" anti-crime effort was underway. Rio police are now going to attempt a similar pacification in another huge slum, Mare.
Silvia Izquierdo AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Brazilian police are preparing to occupy one of the deadliest shantytown complexes in Rio de Janeiro, hoping to drive out drug gangs ahead of next year's World Cup and the 2016 Olympics.

It's the latest "pacification" effort in a Rio slum, and the city's new chief of police says he'll need some 1,500 cops to secure this one, called Mare.

Police in the past would typically stage raids, but then withdraw from the dangerous shantytowns, known here as favelas. But under the pacification program, they now set up shop inside the favelas.

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