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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

The Summer Of Ethan Hawke

Ethan Hawke at the premiere of the film "Before Midnight," at the 63rd annual Berlin Film Festival in February 2013 (Siebbi/commons.wikimedia.org)

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 3:39 pm

It’s been a great summer for actor Ethan Hawke.

Before Midnight,” the third installment in the series of films he made with actress Julie Delpy and filmmaker Richard Linklater, opened to wide critical acclaim, giving him undeniable indie credentials. (See trailers for all three films below.)

He also had had a number one hit at the box office with the horror film “The Purge.”

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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Bird Flu Researchers Push To Make Virus More Contagious

Flu vaccine production - Before incubation, the eggs are inoculated with the seed virus Val de Reuil - France - March 2009. (Sanofi Pasteur/Flickr)

In a letter published today in the nation’s two most prestigious scientific journals — Science and Nature — bird flu researchers say they need to perform research on the H7N9 virus that would make it more dangerous.

The researchers say that’s necessary in order to prepare for its possible spread between humans, perhaps as early as this winter.

The paper comes on the heels of a new study in the British Medical Journal that shows the first probable transmission between humans of the H7N9 virus.

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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Bird Flu Strain May Be Transmissible Between Humans

Health workers take a blood sample from a chicken in Hong Kong Thursday, April 11, 2013. The Hong Kong government started enhanced measures to prevent a new strain of bird flu from entering the city. Starting from Thursday, the authority is taking samples of live poultry from mainland China to test for the H7N9 virus. Thirty samples are taken in every 1,000 chickens. (Vincent Yu/AP)

new study in the British Medical Journal shows the first probable transmission between humans of a new strain of avian flu — the H7N9 virus.

A 32-year-old woman in China became sick and died after caring for her father who had the H7N9 virus. The father also died.

However, the authors of the study stress this does not mean the virus has evolved to be easily transmissible between humans.

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The Two-Way
4:02 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

'Monument To Hell' Is No More: Cleveland Rapist's House Is Torn Down

The house of Ariel Castro, which was found to have served as a prison for three women for years, was reduced to rubble Wednesday.
Brian Bull WCPN

The house of kidnapper and rapist Ariel Castro, the man who was sentenced to life in prison plus 1,000 years last week, has been razed. Michelle Knight, one of the three women for whom the house became a prison for nearly a decade, was on hand for the demolition Wednesday.

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Animals
3:51 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Dolphins Recognize The Calls Of Long-Lost Friends

Kai, seen here at age 16 at the Texas State Aquarium, recognized the whistle of another dolphin, Hastings, who he'd shared a tank with for years before the experiment. Kai is now 20.
Courtesy of Jason Bruck

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:48 pm

Scientists have known for years that dolphins recognize each other by the sound of each animal's signature whistle. But it wasn't known for just how long dolphins could remember these whistle calls.

The individually specific whistle that each dolphin generates before its first birthday "for them functions like a name," says Jason Bruck, who studies animal behavior at the Institute for Mind and Biology at the University of Chicago.

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It's All Politics
3:46 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

4 Years After Fiery Town Halls, Activists Try To Revive Spark

Members of the audience argue before a town hall forum on the health care overhaul hosted by Rep. Jim Moran, D-Va., and former Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean, in Reston, Va., on Aug. 25, 2009.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 11:24 am

It's been four years since protests of the president's health care agenda boiled over in town hall meetings around the country.

The summer of 2009 marked the rise of the Tea Party movement and set in motion the GOP takeover of the House of Representatives the following year.

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The Two-Way
3:40 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Obama Will Deliver Speech On Steps Of The Lincoln Memorial

Marine One flys over the Lincoln Memorial with President Bill Clinton on board as he departed from the National Mall in May of 1999.
Joyce Naltchayan AFP/Getty Images

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the civil rights' movement March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, President Obama will deliver remarks from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, the White House said today.

It was on those same steps that 50 years ago on August 28, that Martin Luther King delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream" speech.

The Washington Post explains:

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Animals
3:31 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Climate Change Could Spell Final 'Chuckle' For Alpine Frog

The Cascades frog is found only in the alpine wetlands of the Pacific Northwest, though its range used to extend down to Northern California and up to British Columbia. Scientists are concerned its range will continue to shrink with climate change.
Ashley Ahearn KUOW

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 6:33 pm

Across the Western U.S., yearly areas of snowpack are decreasing, and researchers are trying to figure out what that means for everything that relies on the snowmelt — from farms to power plants to a little creature known as the Cascades frog.

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Arts & Life
3:31 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Libraries' Leading Roles: On Stage, On Screen And In Song

Poor Donna Reed: Her Mary would have ended up working in a library — shudder — if not for the matrimonial intervention of Jimmy Stewart's George Bailey. Happily, 1946's It's a Wonderful Life isn't the only lens through which pop culture assesses the worth of the institution and those who make it tick.
RKO Pictures Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 3:04 pm

When I was 9, I spent a lot of time at a public library just down the street; I was already a theater nerd, and it had a well-stocked theater section. Not just books, but original cast albums for Broadway shows old and new. One day, an addition: The Music Man, about a salesman who was crazy about a girl named, as one song put it, "Marrrrrrrion, madam librarian."

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Space
3:31 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Black Holes One Of Space's Great Paradoxes

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:48 pm

Late summer tends to be a slow month for news. But at All Things Considered, we put on a two hour program, no matter what. So — without a trace of irony — one of our science correspondents offered to help fill some holes in the show with a series of stories about holes. In this edition: Black holes.

The Salt
3:14 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Bring Home The Bacon Or Put It In A Meat Locker?

Time for a meat locker? One Flickr user's freezer after purchasing a large share of a pig.
Cowgirl Jules via Flickr

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:44 am

Why buy 1 pound of hamburger meat from a local farmer when you can buy 5 pounds — plus another 20 pounds of stew meat, steaks and roast — for as little as half the price of what it all goes for at the market?

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Shots - Health News
3:13 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Fix Is In For Congressional Obamacare Glitch

The new health law has left some 20,000 workers on Capitol Hill unsure of their health care options for the coming year.
Dwight Nadig iStockphoto

Finally, the federal HR department has released the health rule much of Capitol Hill has been waiting for.

There's now an explanation from the Office of Personnel Management on how members of Congress and much of their staff will get their health insurance starting next year.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Arizona Firefighter's Widow May Fight City Over Benefits

Juliann Ashcraft, wife of late firefighter Andrew Ashcraft, receives a U.S. flag during a memorial service in July. Ashcraft says the city has refused to pay full benefits for her husband's death, calling him a seasonal employee.
David Kadlubowski AP

The widow of a man who died fighting a wildfire this summer as part of a "hotshots" team based in Prescott, Ariz., says her attempts to be paid her late husband's lifetime benefits have been denied. The city's explanation is that Andrew Ashcraft, 29, was a seasonal employee, Juliann Ashcraft said Wednesday.

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Shots - Health News
2:51 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Redefining Cancer To Reduce Unnecessary Treatment

Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, explains why calling some conditions cancer creates problems.
Chris Hamilton American Cancer Society

A cancer diagnosis can be downright frightening. And after the initial shock, there can be gruelling rounds of treatment.

But sometimes treatment can be a waste, because the condition a doctor labels as cancer isn't really much of a health threat.

The National Cancer Institute convened a group of specialists last year to look at the problem of overdiagnosis and overtreatment of cancer. One idea: redefine what gets called cancer.

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The Salt
1:52 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

After Immigration Bust, Herb Grower Tries A New Path

Ted Andrews, CEO of HerbCo International, says the H-2A agricultural guest worker program needs improvements.
Liz Jones for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 9:58 pm

The ongoing immigration debate in Congress often spotlights the job market for people living in the U.S. illegally. Not long ago, that market included one of the country's top organic herb farms — until an immigration bust forced the business, based in Washington state, to clean up its payroll.

Ted Andrews, owner of HerbCo International, says he's learned some tough lessons during the transition to a legal workforce. Lesson No. 1: "There are events that can destroy a business in the snap of a finger," he says. "This was one of them."

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The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

3 Extradition Cases That Help Explain U.S.-Russia Relations

A Russian police officer watches a protester during a rally in front of the U.S. Embassy in Moscow in September 2004. Some 500 protesters demanded the extradition of Ilyas Akhmadov from the United States.
Alexander Nemenov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 3:30 pm

Earlier today, diplomatic relations between the United States and Russia suffered a substantial blow, when President Obama pulled out a of planned bilateral meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin in September.

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Why Were The Baboons So Sad? Many Theories, No Answers

The Emmen Zoo's baboons last week, when they were looking so sad.
Courtesy of the Emmen Zoo

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 5:06 am

  • Wijbren Landman, biologist and press officer at the Emmen Zoo, on why baboons sometimes act so sad.

When the keepers at the Netherlands' Emmen Zoo opened the night enclosure for 112 baboons on July 29, they expected the animals would be, as usual, eager to get inside.

After all, the baboons knew there was food for them in there.

Instead, biologist and zoo press officer Wijbren Landman tells All Things Considered the baboons didn't want to budge. "It took us about an hour to get them inside," he says. That night, the baboons didn't eat.

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Parallels
12:59 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

'It's Too Hot': Shanghai Wilts In Record-Setting Heat Wave

People cool off Wednesday in a pool in Shanghai, where temperatures reached an all-time record: 105.4 degrees.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 5:41 pm

Temperatures Wednesday in Shanghai hit an all-time high: 105.4 degrees, according to officials here. It was the hottest day in 140 years, since the government began keeping records.

The Chinese megacity is in the midst of its hottest summer ever.

Usually bustling streets are near empty at noon and thousands have gone to hospitals for relief. To get a feel for how people are handling the heat wave, I waded into a public pool in the city's Hankou district. By early afternoon, the temperature was 98 degrees in the shade, according to the thermometer I brought along.

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Parallels
12:51 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Migrants Flock To Russia, But Receive A Cool Welcome

Migrant workers follow a police officer during a raid by Russian immigration authorities at a construction site in Moscow, in 2012.
Karpov Sergei ITAR-Tass/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 12:26 am

Russia's immigration issues would be familiar to Americans: Millions of impoverished migrants have come and found low-wage jobs. Some are in Russia illegally and are exploited by their employers. And a growing number of Russians fear this influx of migrants, many of whom are Muslim, is changing the face of the country.

At 3:30 on a recent morning, the train from Dushanbe, Tajikistan, pulls into Moscow after a four-day journey. The passengers hauling their bags out onto the damp, ill-lit platform are mostly men. Russian police eye the new arrivals with suspicion.

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Shots - Health News
12:40 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Decades After Henrietta Lacks' Death, Family Gets A Say On Her Cells

Henrietta Lacks and her husband, David, in 1945.
Courtesy of the Lacks family

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 10:03 am

The family of the late Henrietta Lacks finally got the chance to weigh in on how scientists use cells taken from her — without consent — more than 60 years ago.

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The Two-Way
12:38 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

The Road That Gives Electric Vehicles A Charge

An electric city bus in Gumi, South Korea, is part of a program using electromagnetic fields to charge batteries of electric vehicles.
KAIST

A city in South Korea flipped the switch on a road this week that will provide an electric charge to commuter buses on an inner-city route, officials say. The wireless power will be used to run two buses on round-trip routes of 24 kilometers (nearly 15 miles).

The charging road would allow electric vehicles to have much smaller batteries, according to researchers, and to be recharged whether they're parked or on the move.

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Parallels
12:25 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Should The U.S. Speak Up, Or Keep Mum, On Terrorism Threats?

A Yemeni soldier searches a car near the airport in the capital, Sanaa. The United States has ordered Americans to leave Yemen immediately amid a warning of a possible attack.
Mohammed Huwais AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 1:29 pm

Almost every time the U.S. government gets wind of a potential terrorist attack, it faces a tough choice: It can quietly pursue the suspected plotters, or it can go public in the belief that public awareness can discourage or thwart the attack.

In the current episode, the Obama administration has gone public in a big way, announcing the threat, temporarily shutting more than 20 U.S. embassies and diplomatic posts from Rwanda to Bangladesh, and evacuating many embassy workers in Yemen, the country described as the main source of the threat.

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Health Care
12:25 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

'Paying Till It Hurts': Why American Health Care Is So Pricey

"We need a system instead of 20, 40 components, each one having its own financial model, and each one making a profit," says New York Times correspondent Elisabeth Rosenthal.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 2:05 pm

It costs $13,660 for an American to have a hip replacement in Belgium; in the U.S., it's closer to $100,000.

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Movie Reviews
11:55 am
Wed August 7, 2013

A Future Where Class Warfare Is Much More Than A Metaphor

Jody Foster plays her political opposite as the brutal secretary of defense in Elysium.
Kimberley French Sony Pictures

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 2:19 pm

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All Tech Considered
11:47 am
Wed August 7, 2013

A Patch Designed To Make You Invisible To Mosquitoes

Researchers have come up with an innovative patch to help you win the war against mosquitoes.
AP

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The Salt
11:37 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Pot Liquor: A Southern Tip To Save Nutritious Broth From Greens

Instead of throwing out the nutritious broth that's left over when you cook down greens, why not use it as the base for a delicious dish like this rockfish with clams in a garlic-shallot pot liquor sauce?
Alison Aubrey NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 3:07 pm

We don't have to tell you about the growing popularity of greens. From kale to collards to turnips, we've learned to embrace their nutrient-packed bitterness.

So here's a tip: When you're cooking up a big pot of greens, don't toss out what may be the most nutritious part — the brothy water that's left in the pot.

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On Aging
11:06 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Never Too Old To Take Gold

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 11:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And speaking of sports, you might have heard our interview with John Tatum last month. He's the 94-year-old swimmer from Washington, D.C. who was getting ready for three events at the National Senior Games. We wanted to see how we did, so we caught up with him after the games wrapped up.

JOHN TATUM: Well, I got two gold medals and one silver medal, and I call that a successful outing. Although, I wanted to win them all.

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Health
11:06 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Will Changing Cancer Terminology Change Treatment?

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 11:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
11:06 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Are Race-Based Goals In Education Helpful?

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 11:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We wanted additional perspective about this, so we've called Krista Kafer. She's an education policy expert. She's the executive director of Colorado's Future Project. That's a think tank associated with the Independent Women's Forum. Welcome to you, Krista Kafer. Thank you so much for joining us.

KRISTA KAFER: It's great to be here.

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Race
11:06 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Are Lower School Achievement Levels A Civil Rights Issue?

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 11:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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