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Monkey See
6:49 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Point Of View: How So Many Rooted For 'Breaking Bad's' Walter White

How could you not feel sorry for this guy? Vince Gilligan even admitted that he loaded up the Breaking Bad pilot with "reasons to give a damn about" Walter White.
Doug Hyun Courtesy of AMC

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:13 am

If you were still cheering for Walter White at the start of the sixth season (or, as AMC contracts call it, the second half of the fifth season), a mustard stain on a doctor's jacket might be one reason why.

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The Two-Way
6:46 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Ctrl-Alt-Delete Defenders Tell Bill Gates It Wasn't A Mistake

Those are the hands of David Bradley, an original member of the IBM PC team and the inventor of the control-alt-delete function, hitting the right keys.
Bob Jordan AP

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 7:33 am

The news that Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates now says it was a mistake to long ago force Windows PC users to type "Ctrl-Alt-Delete" at start-up is getting tons of attention because his public mea culpas are rather rare.

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Around the Nation
6:42 am
Fri September 27, 2013

North Texas See Mass Migration Of Spiders

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

World
6:38 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Half Marathoner: Bad At Directions, Good At Distance Running

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene with the story of a very happy but long accident. Thirty-four-year-old Meredith Fitzmaurice signed up for the recent Run for Heroes Half Marathon in Ontario, Canada. Somewhere on the route, she took a wrong turn, landing on the full marathon course, 26.2 miles.

And she decided to just keep going. Fitzmaurice ended up being the first woman to cross the finish line, the 10th person overall; and she qualified for the Boston Marathon.

The Two-Way
6:18 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Book News: Apple Seeks Patent For Digital Book-Signing Technology

The Apple logo.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 9:58 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
6:09 am
Fri September 27, 2013

It's Clear Humans Are Changing World's Climate, Panel Says

The Larsen B ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula, which is among the places where such ice has been breaking off.
Mariano Caravaca Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 9:56 am

Declaring that "human influence on the climate system is clear," a U.N.-assembled panel of scientists reported Friday that "it is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century."

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Sax, Drugs And Jazz: Charlie Parker's 'Lightning'-Fast Rise

Charlie Parker, shown here in an undated photo, was a legendary jazz saxophonist.
STF AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 6:53 am

Harlem's Savoy Ballroom, early 1942. The Jay McShann Orchestra from Kansas City, Mo., has the stage, and Charlie "Bird" Parker picks up his alto saxophone:

"The rhythm section had him by the tail, but there was no holding or cornering Bird. Disappearing acts were his specialty. Just when you thought you had him, he'd move, coming up with another idea, one that was as bold as red paint on a white sheet."

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All Tech Considered
5:07 am
Fri September 27, 2013

BlackBerry: If You Don't Survive, May You Rest In Peace

Steve Henn NPR

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 3:45 pm

This may be premature, but it is best to think of this post as an obituary for the BlackBerry, a phone struck down seemingly in its prime. Gone so soon.

BB, we'll miss you.

Over the course of its existence, BlackBerry sold smartphones to more than 200 million people. It became ubiquitous in places like Indonesia, but it began with an invasion of Wall Street and Washington.

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Sports
2:56 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Bream's Slide Decades Ago Dashed Pittsburgh's Playoff Hopes

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:25 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And staying with baseball, let's meet a man who was once closer than anyone to victory and defeat in the same game. It's 1992, the last time the Pittsburgh Pirates were in the post season. They are one out away from the World Series. Atlanta is batting. And this happened.

(SOUNDBITE OF 1992 NATIONAL LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES)

SKIP CARAY: Swung, line drive left field. One run is in. Here comes Bream. Here's the throw to the plate. He is - safe! Braves win! Braves win! Braves win! Braves win!

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERS)

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Sports
2:56 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Fans Experience The Thin Line Between Winning And Losing

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's not just sports teams that win championships. It's also their fans - whole cities of people who endure long seasons, hanging on every pitch, every touchdown, every basket, sharing in both the elation of victory and also the pain of defeat. Major League Baseball's best teams are getting ready for the playoffs next week and so are their faithful. And over the next few minutes we want to feel what it's like to be on the cusp of either a championship - or disaster.

(SOUNDBITE OF 1986 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYOFF GAME)

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Middle East
2:56 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Journalists In Egypt Face 'Unprecedented Pressures'

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:54 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Movie Reviews
2:55 am
Fri September 27, 2013

'Trials' Relives Painful Past Of Muhammad Ali

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:07 am

Three-time heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali has been the subject of many documentaries. But a new one has arrived in theaters: The Trials of Muhammad Ali looks at the former champion's religious and political beliefs.

Education
2:55 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Failing Students Get 'Wired' For Success At Georgia Factory

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:07 am

An electric wire factory in western Georgia is staffed almost entirely by teenagers. They are there because of a partnership between a local company, Southwire, and the Carroll County school system. They teamed up six years ago to try to reduce the high school dropout rate.

Research News
2:06 am
Fri September 27, 2013

How Recycling Bias Affects What You Toss Where

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:07 am

During an experiment, marketing professor Remi Trudel noticed a pattern in what his volunteers were recycling versus throwing in the garbage. He then went through his colleagues' trash and recycling bins at Boston University for more data.

He found the same pattern, says NPR's Shankar Vedantam: "Whole sheets of paper typically went in the recycling, but paper fragments went in the trash."

Same type of paper, different shapes, different bins.

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Shots - Health News
2:05 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Houston Gears Up For Obamacare, Despite GOP Opposition

Enroll America outreach worker Rosy Mota (right) talks about the federal health care law with a CVS customer.
Carrie Feibel

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 7:26 am

Two high-profile Texans are fighting the Affordable Care Act.

Gov. Rick Perry has loudly dismissed the law, and fellow Republican Sen. Ted Cruz took to the Senate floor this week to rail against it at length — 21 hours and 19 minutes to be exact.

On the other side of the issue, you have Rosy Mota and her clipboard, standing at the door of a CVS pharmacy in one of Houston's Latino neighborhoods, stopping shoppers.

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Author Interviews
2:04 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Diane Ravitch Rebukes Education Activists' 'Reign Of Error'

Yunus Arakon iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 7:11 am

Diane Ravitch, a former assistant secretary of education, spent years advocating for an overhaul of the American education system. She supported the No Child Left Behind Act, the charter school movement and standardized testing.

But Ravitch recently — and very publicly — changed her mind. She looked at the data and decided that the kinds of changes she'd supported weren't working. Now she's a prominent critic of things like charter schools and school choice — and she's particularly opposed to privatizing schools.

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StoryCorps
2:03 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Dad To Son: 'I Was Not Going To Let You Drop'

Josh Lampert started having psychotic episodes in college. He's now 32, and he sat down with his father, Chuck, to remember what that struggle was like for both of them.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 9:41 am

Josh Lampert started having psychotic episodes in college, when he was 19 and living in Seattle.

"My diagnosis was psychotic depression," he told his father, Chuck, during a visit to StoryCorps. "You can hallucinate sounds and smells and tastes. And my mistake was doing drugs, because sometimes the line got blurred of what is real and what isn't. Other people seemed like they had so much — social relationships and girlfriends, and I was just trying to function."

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All Tech Considered
2:02 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Students Find Ways To Hack School-Issued iPads Within A Week

Customers test out iPad minis on display in Los Angeles. Students who received free iPads from the Los Angeles Unified School District in a deal with Apple are finding ways to use them for more than just classwork.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 9:53 am

Los Angeles Unified School District started issuing iPads to its students this school year, as part of a $30 million deal with Apple. The rollout is in the first of three phases, and ultimately, the goal is to distribute more than 600,000 devices.

But less than a week after getting their iPads, almost 200 of the districts' high school students found a way to bypass software blocks on the devices that limit what websites the students can use.

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The Two-Way
6:19 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Is The U.S. Collecting Cellphone Location Data?

Gen. Keith Alexander, director of the National Security Agency, in June 2013.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 6:16 am

Is the National Security Agency collecting cellphone tracking information on millions of Americans?

After a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing, we still can't be sure. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., has been trying to get intelligence officials to confirm or deny the existence or nonexistence of such a program.

Remember, records of where your cellphone is located give a pretty good idea of where the owners are. Wyden asked NSA Director Keith Alexander about that at Thursday's hearing, and Alexander said, no — not under "the current program."

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It's All Politics
5:55 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Countdown To Shutdown: It's GOP Senator Vs. GOP Senator

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., looks at a countdown-to-shutdown clock during a news conference in the Capitol on Thursday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Thursday's highlights (and lowlights):

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid raised the possibility that the Senate might be able to finish its work on the budget bill by the end of the day, sending it to the House sooner rather later. If Republicans went along, that would give the House more time to act to avert a government shutdown next week.

Perhaps predictably, Republicans didn't go along. Sen. Mike Lee of Utah, and Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, in particular.

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It's All Politics
5:44 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

What The House Wants: A Debt Ceiling Preview

The government shutdown battle is just the beginning — next comes a fight over the nation's debt ceiling.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 8:53 pm

The showdown over a possible government shutdown is still going on, but already some Republicans are thinking about the next big battle on the horizon — the debt ceiling.

On Thursday, the House GOP's wish list of demands in return for raising the government's debt limit went public.

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Movie Reviews
5:42 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Music Doc Packs 'Muscle' (Plus A Whole Lotta Soul)

Roger Hawkins, a member of the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section (also known as the Swampers), is just one among the many musicians captured in this documentary about the famous town.
Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 9:32 am

Most fans of '60s soul know of Muscle Shoals, the tiny Alabama town that produced huge hits. But only the genre's most studious followers will be able to watch Muscle Shoals without being regularly astonished: Even if it sometimes gets lost in its byways, Greg "Freddy" Camalier's documentary tells an extraordinary story.

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Shots - Health News
5:33 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

A Penicillin Shortage Hinders Treatment For Rheumatic Fever

Streptococcus pyogenes shouldn't be taken lightly. Left untreated, an infection with germ can trigger an autoimmune disease that damages the heart.
NIAID/Flickr.com

We often take antibiotics for granted. If you catch strep throat, a round of penicillin can clear it up in a few days.

But because of a curious drug shortage, in many parts of the world it's now easier to get HIV drugs than an old-fashioned form of penicillin that prevents heart damage from rheumatic fever.

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U.S.
5:31 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Fresno Officials Dismantle Homeless Encampments

A former encampment. Fresno officials have dismantled three shantytowns.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 6:19 pm

Any day now, Fresno plans to raze a large homeless encampment that's grown up near downtown. The poor, farm-dependent city in California's Central Valley has one of the highest per capita homeless populations in the country.

In recent weeks, city officials there have dismantled three other sprawling shantytowns. The moves have displaced hundreds of people and sparked controversy.

Underneath Highway 180

Fresno is one of the poorest places in America. One in 4 people here live below the poverty line, and the recession only made things worse.

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The Two-Way
5:29 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Russia Agrees To U.N. Resolution On Syria's Chemical Weapons

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 6:12 pm

Russia, along with the four other permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, have agreed on a resolution concerning Syria's chemical weapons, the U.S. said today.

The draft resolution, a senior State Department official said in a statement, calls for oversight of Syria's surrender of chemical weapons and calls for "consequences" if Bashar Assad fails to comply.

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The Salt
5:20 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Doctors Say Changes In Wheat Do Not Explain Rise Of Celiac Disease

About 40 years ago wheat breeders introduced new varieties of wheat that helped farmers increase their grain yields. But scientists say those varieties aren't linked to the rise in celiac disease.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 11:09 am

Wheat has been getting a bad rap lately.

Many folks are experimenting with the gluten-free diet, and a best-selling book called Wheat Belly has helped drive a lot of the interest.

"Wheat is the most destructive thing you could put on your plate, no question," says William Davis, a cardiologist in Milwaukee, Wis., who authored the book.

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The Two-Way
5:18 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Scientists Find Sea Louse Has Tidal 'Body Clock'

The speckled sea louse.
Wikipedia Commons

One thing you can say about the diminutive speckled sea louse: it's always on time.

Scientists studying the tiny crustacean, a marine cousin of the wood-louse, found that it runs not one, but two internal clocks. Not only does the creature have a circadian rhythm, or so called "body clock" like most land-dwelling animals, including humans, but it also has a circatidal clock that follows the 12.4-hour cycle of the tide.

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The Salt
5:10 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

McDonald's Says Bye-Bye To Sugary Sodas In Happy Meals

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 7:29 pm

Fast-food giant McDonald's has made a commitment to stop marketing sodas as a beverage option in kids' Happy Meals.

Instead, the chain has committed to market and promote only milk, water and juice with the children's meals.

Now, if parents order a Coke or Sprite with their child's Happy Meal, they won't be turned down. But sodas will no longer be marketed or promoted visually in any of McDonald's advertisements or in-store visuals.

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Education
4:59 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Student Loan Changes Squeeze Historically Black Colleges

Students and alumni line up at Howard University in Washington, D.C., before August's commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.
Nathaniel Grann The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:46 pm

Stricter lending guidelines for federal school loans have made it harder to borrow money for college. Changes made in 2011 to the PLUS loan program especially have hurt historically black colleges and universities, or HBCUs, over the past few years.

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Found Recipes
4:59 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Hash Browns To Soothe Any Homesick Midwesterner

If someone asked for onions and green peppers fried into his hash browns, the crunchy grated spuds became "glorified." Amy Thielen shared a recipe for All Things Considered's Found Recipe series.
Amy Thielen for NPR

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 7:09 pm

Ten years ago, when Amy Thielen moved to Brooklyn, N.Y., she and her husband bemoaned the lack of hash browns in the city. She says there were ample breakfast places serving home fries or sliced potatoes cooked with peppers and onions — but no hash browns.

"My husband would often rail when we would sit down to a plate of home fries," Thielen says. "He would say, 'Where is the dividing line? Where do hash browns stop in the United States?' "

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