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Religion
4:12 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Catholic Church Examines Financial Cost Of Sainthood

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 6:00 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

There are thousands of saints recognized by the Catholic Church. But canonization, the process of declaring a person a saint, requires a long, rigorous and expensive process. Just outside Buffalo in Lackawanna, New York, Our Lady of Victory Basilica is midway through that process for Father Nelson Baker. Father Baker was ordained in 1876 and spent nearly his entire ministry at that church where he developed a small orphanage and a school.

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Law
4:12 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

With Expanded Definition, Rape Is Reported More Often

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 6:00 pm

Two years after the Justice Department rewrote the official definition of rape, reports of rape have increased in most cities. Under the old definition, however, the number of rapes between 2012 and 2013 were down.

Sports
4:12 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Sochi Olympic Flame Is Extinguished

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 6:00 pm

The last big games of the Olympics, including the gold medal hockey game and four-man bobsled, concluded Sunday. After the closing ceremony, thousands headed for Sochi's tiny airport. NPR's Robert Smith provides a roundup of highlights.

The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

American Held In Israel For 1997 Murder Is Killed In Prison Shootout

Samuel Sheinbein, 18, arrives at the Tel Aviv District Court in this March 22, 1999 file photo. He was killed in a prison shootout on Sunday after being imprisoned for 17 years.
STAFF Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 8:50 am

Samuel Sheinbein, an American who fled to Israel after murdering a Maryland teenager 17 years ago, was killed in a prison shootout on Sunday during an apparent escape attempt near Tel Aviv.

The Associated Press reports:

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The Two-Way
3:15 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Taliban Break Off Negotiations On U.S. Soldier Held Since 2009

A Taliban-affiliated website shows Bowe R. Bergdahl, a U.S. soldier captured by the Taliban in southeastern Afghanistan in June, 2009, sometime after his capture by Taliban militants.
Reuters/Landov

The Afghan Taliban said it was cutting off talks with Washington to trade long-time captive U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five of the prisoners held at Guantanamo.

The Associated Press says it's received via email "a terse Pashto language statement" from Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid blaming the "current complex political situation in the country" for suspending the discussions.

The AP says a U.S. official confirms that the talks have been suspended.

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The Two-Way
1:38 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Egypt's Morsi Accused Of Aiding Iran's Revolutionary Guards

Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi in a soundproof barred glass cage is seen during a court appearance on Feb. 16.
Mohammed al-Law AP

Ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi has been accused of passing state secrets to Iran's Revolutionary Guard at a hearing at the jailed leader's trial in Cairo.

A prosecutor at the hearing said Morsi, who stands accused of numerous charges, was involved along with 35 others in a plot to destabilize Egypt.

The BBC reports:

"Mr Morsi's supporters say he and other senior Muslim Brotherhood leaders are the victims of politically motivated prosecutions.

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Author Interviews
1:26 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

'Cut Me Loose': After Exile, A Young Woman's Journey In 'Sin'

Leah Vincent is a board member of Footsteps and co-producer of the It Gets Besser project, both of which help support people who have decided to leave ultra-Orthodoxy.
Ned & Aya Rosen Leah Vincent

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 12:44 pm

Leah Vincent was born into the Yeshivish community, an ultra-Orthodox sect of Judaism, in Pittsburgh.

"Yeshivish Judaism life is defined by religious law," Vincent tells NPR's Arun Rath. "We keep extra-strict laws of kosher, observe the Sabbath every week, maintain a separation of the sexes and a degree of isolation from the outside world."

When she was 16, she was caught exchanging letters with a male friend. Contact with men is forbidden in her sect, and she was cast out from her community.

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All Tech Considered
12:02 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

A Father Plays Call Of Duty With His Son, Watched By Thousands

Jason Munkel and his father stream their Call of Duty games online every night. In the past year, they've gained more than 120,000 followers.
Twitch/Activision

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 2:59 pm

Jason Munkel and his father Bill are 39 years apart in age, but since last year, they've been sitting down together to play Call of Duty: Ghosts almost every night.

They also broadcast their gameplay to more than 120,000 followers, who watch the father-son duo pursue and shoot enemies on the screen, and talk to them during the game. Sometimes they do this for six to seven hours a day, and their audience has grown dramatically in just one year, though not all watch every day.

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The Edge
11:39 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Flame Goes Out In Sochi, Torch Passes To Pyeongchang

Pyrotechnics explode over dancers formed into the Olympic rings during the closing ceremony of the 2014 Winter Olympics, on Sunday.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 12:42 pm

This post was last updated at 1:40 p.m. ET.

The torch has officially been passed. The 22nd Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia, are over with all the drama in the competition and not over safety and security during the 17 days of the events, as many had feared.

Outdoor fireworks rattled Sochi's Fisht Stadium as the Olympic flame was set to be extinguished Sunday. Winners and losers in the international competition now will have to look east to South Korea to test their Olympic mettle in the contest for medals four years from now, in 2018.

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Movie Reviews
11:08 am
Sun February 23, 2014

A 'Tale' That's A Labor Of Love, But Not A Complete Success

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Book fans can be pretty picky about how Hollywood treats their favorite reads. And Hollywood can sometimes disappoint. Marc Helprin's "Winter's Tale" has been a favorite of readers since it was published in 1983. Los Angeles Times and MORNING EDITION film critic Kenneth Turan has a review of how well it works as a movie.

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The Sunday Conversation
9:18 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Fed Up With Harassment, Author Reveals Her Cyberstalker

Author Melissa Anelli has to let the FBI know whenever she travels abroad, so that law enforcement in other countries is alerted to the possibility her stalker might show up.
Jordan Edwards

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 9:45 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Melissa Anelli is the author of Harry, A History, a best-selling book about Harry Potter from J.K. Rowling's famous series. And for more than five years, she has also been the victim of a cyberstalker.

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Law
8:49 am
Sun February 23, 2014

N.Y. Becomes Largest Prison System To Curb Solitary Confinement

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:57 am

New York made sweeping changes this week to the way prisons use solitary confinement.

The deal, signed by a federal judge on Wednesday, was prompted by a federal lawsuit filed by critics who say thousands of inmates — some of them pregnant or mentally ill — are being held for months and even years in isolation, often for minor infractions.

Years Spent In Solitary

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Many Wounded, 2 Dead In Bangkok Bomb Blast

Thai soldiers check the site of a bomb explosion in Bangkok, Thailand, on Sunday. At least 22 people, including three children, were wounded in a bomb explosion near an anti-government protest site.
Rachen Sageamsak Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 12:26 pm

An apparent grenade attack on an anti-government protest in Thailand's capital has killed at least two people and wounded nearly two dozen others, as unrest in the country continues amid a push by opposition forces to topple the elected prime minister.

NPR's Michael Sullivan reports:

"The blast occurred near Central World shopping mall in the heart of [Bangkok] and at least three children are among those most seriously injured, according to the government-run Erawan Medical Center.

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Sports
8:29 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Suitgate And Extreme Sports: An Olympic Wrapup

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:57 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Edge
7:51 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Russia, With Home-Field Advantage, Wins Sochi Medal Race

Russia RUS-1 bobsled team, with Alexander Zubkov, Alexey Negodaylo, Dmitry Trunenkov, and Alexey Voevoda, jump onto the medal stand after winning gold on Sunday. On the last day of the Sochi Games, Russia had already secured the top spot in the overall medal count.
Dita Alangkara AP

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 9:08 am

Just two medals remain to be awarded at the Winter Olympics in Sochi, as Canada and Sweden face off on the hockey ice. If the Canadian men take gold, Canada will have swept all four traditional team sports. Canadian teams have already won gold in men's and women's curling and women's ice hockey.

[Add at 10:00 a.m. ET: Canada's men's hockey team has won the gold]

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Sunday Puzzle
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Famous Four-By-Fours That Aren't Trucks

NPR

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:57 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is the name of a famous person with four letters in his or her first name and four letters in the last. For each person, you'll be given initials and an anagram of the full name. You name the person.

Last week's challenge: Name a famous entertainer: two words, four letters in each word. You can rearrange these eight letters to spell the acronym of a well-known national organization, and the word that the first letter of this acronym stands for. Who's the entertainer, and what's the organization?

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Author Interviews
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

In 'Kinder Than Solitude,' History Always Haunts

Courtesy of Random House

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:57 am

Kinder Than Solitude, the latest novel from Chinese-American author Yiyun Li, examines the impact of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre on a generation of youth. Following three friends, the novel alternates between 1990s Beijing and present-day America, where two of the friends immigrated. At the heart of the story is the mysterious murder that brought the three friends together over 20 years ago, and what they're only now learning about it.

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Movie Interviews
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Director Says 'Omar' Is A Love Story, Not A War Story

Adam Bakri plays a Palestinian baker recruited as an informant by the Israeli secret service in the Oscar-nominated film Omar.
Adopt Films

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 4:31 pm

Omar is a young Palestinian baker who often climbs the Israeli-built security barrier that divides his hometown — to visit his secret Israeli love, Nadia. After he's arrested and accused of the murder of an Israeli soldier, he starts working as an informant for Shin Bet, the Israeli secret service; it's a dangerous game Omar plays, one that brings trust, love and friendship into question.

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Music Interviews
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Megaband Formed On Craigslist Becomes The Family Crest

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 3:12 pm

There are big bands and then there are really big bands, like The Family Crest, which features around 300 players. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with lead vocalist Liam McCormick about the band.

Music Interviews
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

That Elusive Element Of Brazilian Bossa Nova

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 3:12 pm

Classic Brazilian bossa nova music has a familiar, slow, graceful pulse. NPR's Felix Contreras of Alt.Latino plays some songs for NPR's Rachel Martin.

Latin America
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

El Chapo's Arrest Punctures Drug Lord's Near-Mythical Status

Mexican Marines escort Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman to a helicopter in Mexico City on Saturday.
Marco Ugarte AP

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 11:18 am

One of the world's most powerful drug lords has been captured. Mexico's head of the Sinaloa drug cartel, Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, was arrested in an operation that Mexican officials say involved the cooperation of U.S. authorities.

Guzman has been on the run for years and his capture puts an end to one of the longest and most profitable careers in the drug world. That capture began as the sun rose up over the hotel-lined beaches of Mazatlan early Saturday morning.

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Africa
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Hero Or Dictator? Mugabe After 34 Years At Zimbabwe's Helm

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:57 am

Zimbabwe's president, Robert Mugabe, is 90 years old. In power since 1980, Mugabe is considered a despot in the West. NPR's Rachel Martin discusses his legacy with reporter Ofeibea Quist-Arcton.

Middle East
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

UN Security Council Agrees On Syria Aid Resolution

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:57 am

The UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution Saturday to boost humanitarian aid access in Syria. More than 9 million people need help, according to the U.N.

Europe
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

A Coup Or A Revolution? The U.S. Ambassador To Ukraine Explains

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:57 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to stay in Kiev now and speak with Geoffrey Pyatt. He is the U.S. ambassador to the Ukraine and he joins me live on the line. Welcome to the program, ambassador.

AMBASSADOR GEOFFREY PYATT: Good morning, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, the big question. Is this a coup or is this a revolution? How does the U.S. perceive this?

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Europe
7:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Ukrainian Parliament Gives Presidential Powers To Speaker

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:57 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
6:49 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Last Of The 'Sound Of Music' Von Trapps Dies At 99

Maria von Trapp in 2008 at the age of 93. The daughter of Austrian Baron Georg von Trapp points to her father on an old family picture. She died on Tuesday at her home in Vermont.
Kerstin Joensson AP

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 12:29 pm

Maria von Trapp, the last surviving member of the seven original Trapp Family Singers — the Austrian family that inspired the 1965 film The Sound of Music -- has died at 99 at her home in Vermont.

Von Trapp, whose family escaped Nazi Germany, died on Tuesday of natural causes, her brother Johannes von Trapp said, according to the New York Daily News.

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The Two-Way
6:29 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Head Of Ukrainian Parliament Assumes Presidential Power

A woman cries Sunday in front of a memorial to people killed in clashes with police in Independence Square, Kiev.
Marko Drobnjakovic AP

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 4:04 pm

This post was updated at 4:00 p.m. ET.

Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych's opponents are moving quickly to take government power, although no one is certain how permanent those moves will be.

The Ukrainian legislature has voted to give the president's powers temporarily to the Parliament speaker, Oleksandr Turchinov.

On Sunday, Turchinov addressed the nation, saying that Ukraine was ready to talk to Moscow about improving relations, but made it clear that further integration with Europe would be his top priority.

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My Guilty Pleasure
6:03 am
Sun February 23, 2014

For This British Author, If It Bleeds, She Reads

iStockphoto

The first thing you need to know about my guilty pleasure is that you probably share it. George Orwell certainly did. He writes about it in his 1946 essay, Decline of the English Murder: "It is Sunday afternoon ... Your pipe is drawing sweetly, the sofa cushions are soft underneath you, the fire is well alight, the air is warm and stagnant. In these blissful circumstances, what it is that you want to read about? Naturally, about a murder."

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Fitness & Nutrition
4:21 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Can Exercising Seniors Help Revive A Brooklyn Neighborhood?

Linda Beckford (right) exercises as part of a walking group that tries to make their neighborhood a better place to live. If nothing else, the seniors feel more confident about going outside.
Quoctrung Bui NPR

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:57 am

The Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y., is known for many things, among them huge public housing projects, extremely high poverty and crime. Last summer, a one-year-old boy was shot in the head and killed as he sat in a stroller in the neighborhood.

But that's one side of life in Brownsville. Down the street from that murder, on weekday mornings, is another side.

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Latin America
4:19 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Drought Could Drain More Than Brazil's Coffee Crop

The ground outside Sao Paulo is cracked and dry. It was the hottest January on record in parts of Brazil, and the heat plus a severe drought has fanned fears of water shortages and crop damage.
Nacho Doce Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 11:01 am

Brazil, a country usually known for its rainforests, has been facing a severe drought in its breadbasket region, leaving people in the cities without water and farmers in the countryside with dying crops. Global prices for coffee, in particular, have been affected.

Scientists in Brazil say the worst is yet to come — yet no one in the government, it seems, is listening.

On a recent day, farmer Juliano Jose Polidor walks through the desiccated remains of his cornfields.

What's happened to this crop, he says, is a total loss.

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