Nation/World

Pages

Sports
3:20 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

His Dodgers In The Playoffs, A Legendary Announcer Keeps On

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 5:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

For the first time in four years, the Los Angeles Dodgers are in the playoffs. They have plenty of stars on the field, but the most famous and beloved member of the organization is in the radio booth. Eighty-five-year-old Vin Scully has been broadcasting games for 64 years. Ben Bergman of member station KPCC got a rare interview with Scully, who says he'll keep going for at least another year.

VIN SCULLY: It's time for Dodger baseball.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:20 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Deepwater Horizon Trial Enters Second Phase

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 5:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Read more
NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Historian Reveals Ben Franklin's Not-So-Famous Sister

Here & Now's Alex Ashlock spoke to historian Jill Lepore at the Granary Burying Ground in Boston, where Benjamin and Jane Franklin's parents are buried. (aScratch/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:50 am

Benjamin Franklin is arguably the most famous American ever. His youngest sister Jane is mostly lost to history. But Harvard historian Jill Lepore found her in the letters she and her brother exchanged over their long lives. They were called Benny and Jenny and Benny wrote more letters to Jenny than he did to anyone else. Most of his survive; many of hers do not.

Read more
NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

What Happens If The Debt Ceiling Isn't Raised?

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 5:08 pm

All eyes are on whether Congress will resolve the government shutdown, which has entered its seventh day.

But an even more serious concern is the debt ceiling.

If lawmakers on Capitol Hill fail to raise the nation’s debt ceiling by October 17th, the government will run out of money to pay all of its bills.

If this were to happen it hurt the economy and the country’s credit rating, and some people simply wouldn’t get paid.

Read more
NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Rodriguez Sues MLB, Yankees' Doctor

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 5:08 pm

This weekend, the Oakland A’s beat the Detroit Tigers 1 to 0, and the Boston Red Sox bested the Tampa Bay Rays 7 to 4 in the American League. In the National League, the Dodgers won against the Braves 13 to 6 and the Pirates took the Cardinals 5 to 3.

But New York Yankees fans might have been paying more attention to Alex Rodriguez’s lawsuits.

On Thursday, the Yankee’s third baseman announced that he’s suing Major League Baseball and MLB commissioner Bud Selig over his 211-game suspension for taking performance enhancing drugs, claiming MLB is trying to ruin his career.

Read more
Parallels
2:53 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Here's Why The Navy Is Holding A Terror Suspect At Sea

Libyan protesters burn a replica of the U.S. flag on Monday during a demonstration against the capture of Abu Anas al-Libi. U.S. forces seized him Saturday in the Libyan capital Tripoli. He is accused of involvement in two U.S. embassy bombings in Africa in 1998 and is being held on a U.S. Navy ship in the Mediterranean Sea.
Esam OmranAl-Fetori Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:45 am

After seizing terror suspect Abu Anas al-Libi in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, U.S. forces took him to a ship in the Mediterranean where he could be interrogated for weeks or even months to come.

Why a ship?

In short, this allows the U.S. to hold and question al-Libi about his alleged role in a pair of 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in Africa without putting him in the U.S. civilian court system, which could limit or halt efforts to interrogate him.

Read more
World Cafe
2:32 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

World Cafe Next: Jesse Woods

Jesse Woods.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 9:56 am

  • Hear Two Songs By Jesse Woods

Jesse Woods performs a unique style of echo-laden folk music. The singer moved to Austin, Texas, about four years ago — and says he was drawn to the area because of its "hint of strange."

Woods spent most of 2012 recording songs for his full-length debut, Get Your Burdens Lifted, in a studio he built himself. Hear a pair of tracks from the album and download this week's podcast.

The Two-Way
2:16 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

China Cautions U.S. Over Debt Ceiling Fight

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 4:56 pm

China — which holds nearly $1.3 trillion in U.S. securities (pdf) — is asking the U.S. to get its finances in order and not allow a political stalemate to cause the country to default on its obligations for the first time in history.

The United States is expected to run out of money by Oct. 17, so the Treasury needs Congress to extend its credit limit before then. As has happened before, the House and Senate are at odds and the prospects of a compromise look shaky.

Read more
World Cafe
2:11 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Vampire Weekend: A-Punks On Afro-Pop

Vampire Weekend
Courtesy of the artist

This segment, from Jan. 24, 2008, is part of our Vintage Cafe series, in which we revisit some of our best studio performances.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Taliban Vows To Try Again To Kill Pakistani Teen

Malala Yousafzai speaks after receiving the leadership in civil society award at the annual Clinton Global Initiative award ceremony in New York last month.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 1:48 pm

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager who spent months recovering after being shot in the head by the Taliban for championing the right of girls to education, says the way forward is to talk to the militants who attacked her.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:34 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Justice Scalia Talks Satan, 'Seinfeld' And Gays

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia speaks during an event at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 3:02 pm

It's the first Monday in October, which means the Supreme Court is back in business after its long summer break.

Read more
Tiny Desk Concerts
1:33 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Superchunk: Tiny Desk Concert

Superchunk performs a Tiny Desk Concert on Sept. 30, 2013.
Abbey Oldham NPR

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 5:06 pm

It's remarkable to think that Superchunk's career has spanned four decades. The North Carolina band got its start in 1989, and here it is in 2013, with a new record called I Hate Music that demonstrates an undying passion for punk-fueled story songs with catchy phrasing.

Read more
All Songs Considered
1:15 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Question Of The Week: What Was The Last Record You Obsessed Over?

The Blow is a duo from Portland, Ore., featuring Khaela Maricich and Melissa Dyne.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 4:57 pm

Read more
Favorite Sessions
1:15 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

KEXP Presents: Shugo Tokumaru

Shugo Tokumaru performs live on KEXP.
Dave Lichterman KEXP

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:07 pm

KEXP's session with Japanese musician Shugo Tokumaru would be charming in any language. On his albums, the young multi-instrumentalist meticulously crafts every aspect by himself, and he's reported to have used more than 100 different instruments in his recordings. Live in the studio here, he's backed by a small army of musicians who wield a colorful arsenal of tiny plastic whistles, toy xylophones, bird whistles and more. The band even brings along a clown puppet.

Read more
Book Reviews
12:53 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Out Of Lahiri's Muddy 'Lowland,' An Ambitious Story Soars

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 2:53 pm

Geography is destiny in Jhumpa Lahiri's new novel, The Lowland. Her title refers to a marshy stretch of land between two ponds in a Calcutta neighborhood where two very close brothers grow up. In monsoon season, the marsh floods and the ponds combine; in summer, the floodwater evaporates. You don't need your decoder ring to figure out that the two ponds symbolize the two brothers — at times separate; at other times inseparable. But there's still more meaning lurking in this rich landscape.

Read more
Movie Interviews
12:52 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Tom Hanks Is 'Captain Phillips' In High-Seas Hostage Drama

Prior to filming, director Paul Greengrass kept the pirate crew and the boat crew separate to make the hijacking scenes feel more authentic. "The hair did stand up on the back of our heads," says Tom Hanks, above.
Hopper Stone, SMPSP

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 2:24 pm

In April 2009, Somali pirates boarded an American-flagged container ship and took its captain, Richard Phillips, hostage on a small lifeboat. That led to a five-day drama at sea, much of it covered on television, as a U.S. Navy destroyer tailed the lifeboat and Navy SEAL sharpshooters eventually freed the captain. In 2010 Phillips wrote a memoir called A Captain's Duty and the harrowing experience has now been adapted into a film called Captain Phillips.

Read more
The Salt
12:43 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Limited Edition Candy Corn Oreo

Signed, sealed, delivered, it's gross.
NPR

Nabisco has released a special edition of its classic sandwich cookie, just in time for Halloween: Oreos with candy corn filling. This beats the July 4 special, the Oreo filled with a live M-80.

Eva: I didn't even know candy corn and Oreos were dating ... now they have a kid?!

Robert: When I eat regular Oreos, I want a glass of milk. When I eat these, I want a glass of poison.

(Weirdly, the filling lacks the waxy quality of candy corn, which Robert says is because it doesn't have any quality at all.)

Read more
Parallels
12:02 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

A Chemical Attack, And Now Food Shortages In Syrian Town

A woman carries a sack of food aid on her head in Ghouta, Syria, earlier this month.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:46 am

The author is a Syrian citizen in Damascus who is not being further identified for safety reasons.

The boy on the bicycle wasn't old enough to have facial hair. His feet barely reached the ground as he stopped and moved, circling the soldier manning the government checkpoint in east Ghouta, a suburb of Damascus.

"Please, just one bag of bread," the boy, lips quivering, said to the soldier. "Just one."

"I told you, no. No means no, young man," the soldier replied. "No food is allowed inside." He seemed somewhat pained at having to deprive a child of food.

Read more
The Salt
11:42 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Labor-Starved Pear Farmers Buckle Under Bumper Crop

Some of this season's Comice pear harvest is rotting in Pacific Northwest orchards because there aren't enough workers to pick it.
Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 12:12 pm

It's always a bit sad to say goodbye to summer corn and tomatoes, and settle into fall.

There are consolations, though — like the new crop of pears. Over 80 percent of America's fresh pears are grown in the Pacific Northwest, and this year's harvest is slated to be one of the biggest on record.

But some of the fruit is rotting in the orchards because there aren't enough workers to pick them.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:39 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Fan's Video Captures Scary Scene Of Franchitti's IndyCar Crash

A safety team works to remove Dario Franchitti from his car after a high-speed crash at the IndyCar Grand Prix of Houston Sunday. The driver was hospitalized with a fractured spine and other injuries.
Juan DeLeon AP

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 1:27 pm

Read more
Music
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Blitz: The Ambassador Of Hip-Hop And African Music

Quazi King Blitz the Ambassador

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 12:23 pm

Rapper Blitz the Ambassador explains to Tell Me More for the occasional series "In Your Ear," that his favorite songs are the ones that helped shape his sound. "I keep these songs really close because they always remind me of where it all begins, and what makes me the artist that I am," he says.

As his name suggests, Blitz sees himself as an ambassador for Africa and hip-hop.

Read more
Performing Arts
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

The Fat Lady Sings For New York City Opera

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. They call it The People's Opera, but after this month, the New York City Opera will exist only in the history books. The renowned company is closing after 70 years. The New York City Opera failed to raise the $7 million it needed to cover its debts and will file for bankruptcy protection.

Read more
Arts & Life
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

An Artist's Story Of The Arab Spring

Upheaval in countries like Egypt and Syria is often discussed in political terms, but how do artists see it? Guest host Celeste Headlee talks about arts and the Arab Spring with Egyptian-American poet Yahia Lababidi and Syrian-American doctor Dr. Zaher Sahloul.

World
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Has The US Forgotten Egypt?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. We're going to spend some time talking now about Egypt, where more than 50 people were killed over the weekend in clashes between the military and supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi. In a moment, we'll speak to an Egyptian-American who has written poetry inspired by the unrest there.

Read more
Politics
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Govt. Shutdown: Does The Minority Rule?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Coming up, diplomats around the world continue to pay close attention to the events in Syria and Iran, but one scholar explains why we shouldn't forget about Egypt. That's in a few minutes.

Read more
NPR Story
10:54 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Wait, Yelling Hurts Kids?

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 11:09 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
10:54 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Pyramid Schemes: If It Looks Too Good To Be True, It Probably Is

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 11:09 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
10:54 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Translating Iranian Dealings, One President At A Time

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani answers a question during a news conference in New York last month.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 2:58 pm

U.S. and Iranian diplomatic relations made a big jump last month when President Obama and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani spoke directly by phone. It's the first time an American president has spoken to an Iranian leader in more than three decades. That phone call, of course, wasn't a cure-all. The U.S. and Israel remain concerned about Iran's efforts to develop a nuclear program, among other things.

Read more
Code Switch
10:38 am
Mon October 7, 2013

How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines

The "boondocks" or "boonies" refers to places that are in the middle of nowhere. But few people know that the phrase was made mainstream by a fatal military training accident.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 2:16 pm

"Ugh, I have to visit my aunt out in the boondocks this weekend."

How often have you said or heard something similar? For more than half a century, Americans have used the phrase "the boondocks" or "the boonies" to indicate that a place was in the middle of nowhere. However, few people realize that the phrase is a relic of American military occupation in the Philippines, and that it was later brought to mainstream attention because of a now largely forgotten, fatal training accident on Parris Island.

Read more
Monkey See
9:15 am
Mon October 7, 2013

A Hint That J.D. Salinger Kept Writing, From A Story He Didn't Write

J.D. Salinger shown in September 1961.
AP

With J.D. Salinger in the news three years after his death (and the new documentary and biography must have that obsessively private author spinning in his grave), I'm reminded of my conversations in the 1970s about Salinger with the editor of The New Yorker, William Shawn.

Read more

Pages