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The Salt
2:58 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

A Fight Over Vineyards Pits Redwoods Against Red Wine

Environmental groups are fighting to stop the leveling of 154 acres of coast redwoods and Douglas firs to make way for grapevines.
Courtesy Friends of the Gualala River

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 5:18 pm

In the California wine mecca of Sonoma County, climate change is pitting redwood lovers against red wine lovers.

This Friday morning, a coalition of environmental groups are in a Santa Rosa, Calif., courtroom fighting to stop a Spanish-owned winery from leveling 154 acres of coast redwoods and Douglas firs to make way for grapevines.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Four Years Later, Army Hero Honored

President Barack Obama awards the Medal of Honor to retired Army Captain William D. Swenson on Wednesday. (AP/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 2:47 pm

This week, retired Army Capt. William Swenson was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during an intense firefight in Afghanistan in 2009.

His team was conducting meetings with village elders in the village of Ganjar, in Kunar Province, when they were ambushed.

Swenson was honored for risking his life several times to rescue fellow troops and recover bodies during the seven-hour battle.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Former Republican Congressman: Dysfunction In Washington Is 'Systemic'

A view of the U.S. Capitol building on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013 in Washington. (AP/ Evan Vucci)

Mickey Edwards represented Oklahoma’s 5th district for 16 years in Congress. Edwards says the dysfunction in Washington is a “systemic problem,” and can’t be cured until the power of political parties diminishes.

Edwards told Here & Nows Jeremy Hobson that the last impasse in Washington is a result of how the political parties, both the Democrats and the Republicans, operate.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Puerto Rico Struggles With Debt Crisis

Puerto Rico Gov. Alejandro Garcia Padilla speaks during a state of the commonwealth address at the Capitol building in San Juan, Puerto Rico in April, 2013. (AP/Ricardo Arduengo)

Puerto Rico has about $87 billion of debt — that’s about $23,000 for every resident.

The island nation is a U.S. territory, but it can’t declare bankruptcy.

Puerto Rican politicians are looking to raise taxes and cut pension obligations. 

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It's All Politics
1:34 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Obama's Immigration Pivot Hits A Bruised GOP's Weak Spot

Demonstrators supporting an immigration overhaul stage a sit-down protest at the offices of Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., on Oct. 11.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 6:58 pm

After successfully staring down congressional Republicans in the shutdown-debt ceiling fight, President Obama pivoted to immigration in a move with almost no downside.

That makes it perfect as the next vehicle for him to use to cause the GOP major indigestion.

Before being re-elected last year, President Obama said he hoped the Republican "fever" of opposition to him would break during his second term. But if the just-completed standoff is any indication, that temperature is still spiking.

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The Two-Way
1:29 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Obama Nominates Jeh Johnson To Head Homeland Security

President Obama stands with Jeh Johnson, his choice for the next Homeland Security secretary, and Vice President Joe Biden, in the White House Rose Garden on Friday.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 6:22 pm

President Obama on Friday nominated Jeh Johnson, who used to be the top lawyer at the Pentagon, to serve as the country's next secretary of Homeland Security.

His nomination will have to be confirmed by the Senate.

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NPR Story
12:48 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Making Sense of Science Infographics

Transcript

JOHN DANKOSKY, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm John Dankosky. Chances are, without even realizing it, you've seen at least one infographic today. Did you catch the weather forecast this morning? Maybe you saw a rain cloud moving across a map of the U.S. Maybe you opened the paper to find pie charts of the latest poll results. Now those are infographics.

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NPR Story
12:48 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Logging In to the Brain's Social Network

Does the pain we feel from rejection and loss have the same effect as physical pain? How does our brain respond to social interactions? In his new book Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect , social neuroscientist Matthew Lieberman describes the biology behind how our brains engage with the social world.

NPR Story
12:48 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Promising New Treatment for the Deadly Ebola Virus

Transcript

JOHN DANKOSKY, HOST:

Now, for many of us, we first heard about the Ebola virus from the movie "Outbreak," Dustin Hoffman trying to contain an outbreak of an Ebola-like virus in a small California town. Well, in the 18 years since that movie came out, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has documented 18 known outbreaks of Ebola, with the most recent happening last fall in the Congo.

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NPR Story
12:48 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

With Shutdown Over, Scientists Assess the Damage

Transcript

JOHN DANKOSKY, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm John Dankosky. Ira Flatow is away. After nearly three weeks, the shutdown is finally over. The Smithsonian is open, national parks have opened up their gates, and federal labs all over the country are turning on their lights. But not everyone is back to business as usual. Many scientists who were about to start their field season in Antarctica had their trips cancelled or postponed.

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Science
12:48 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Vines Choking Out Trees in the Tropics

Transcript

JOHN DANKOSKY, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm John Dankosky.

If you've ever walked through the jungle, you'll know it can be surprisingly dark down on the forest floor. You see trees soaring up all around. You're creating a dense canopy overhead. And climbing toward that canopy, snaking up the trees are the vines.

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All Tech Considered
12:28 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Tech Week That Was: Surveillance Scope, Apple's Retail Hire

Burberry CEO Angela Ahrendts is moving to Apple, where she will head the company's retail division.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 1:59 pm

It's time for your Friday week in review, a look at the big headlines and conversation in the tech and culture space.

ICYMI

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The Two-Way
12:08 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

India Arrests Crew Of U.S. Ship For Carrying Weapons

Indian policemen escort crew members of a U.S.-owned ship MV Seaman Guard Ohio outside a court in Tuticorin, in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, on Friday.
AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 2:56 pm

The crew of a U.S.-owned ship has been arrested at a port in India for allegedly trying to enter territorial waters illegally carrying what's been described as a "huge cache" of weapons.

The 35 crew members on MV Seaman Guard Ohio, owned by Washington, D.C.-based AdvanFort, were detained on Saturday by the Indian Coast Guard. The vessel is currently at anchor in the port of Tuticorin in the southeastern state of Tamil Nadu.

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Code Switch
12:02 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Asian-Americans To Evangelicals: We're Not Your Punch Line

A joking Facebook post by Saddleback Church's Rick Warren was the catalyst for a pointed letter from some 700 evangelical Asian-Americans.
Donna McWilliam AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:48 am

"We the undersigned, are distressed about the continuing divide that persists in the North American evangelical church in the area of racial harmony."

That's the first line of a four-page open letter to American Evangelicals ("On Cultural Insensitivity and Reconciliation in the Church") from a coalition called Asian American Christians United. The letter was released earlier this week.

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Parallels
11:58 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Egypt's Crackdown On Islamists Spreads To Mosques, Charities

A physician collects medical equipment and medicines from the remains of the partially destroyed Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque compound hospital in Cairo on Aug. 15.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 9:09 pm

Mohammed is a teacher, and for the past 17 years, he has also worked with an Islamic charity in Cairo. But a little more than two weeks ago that charity was shut down.

Security forces raided its office, took everything and began searching for the head of the board of directors because he's connected to the Muslim Brotherhood — the Islamist group of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

Mohammed, who asked that only his first name be used, fled.

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Movie Reviews
11:40 am
Fri October 18, 2013

For A Free Spirit, A Grim '12 Years' In Chains

Chiwetel Ejiofor (left) plays Solomon Northup, a New York freeman kidnapped into slavery in 1841 and eventually resold to plantation owner Edwin Epps (Michael Fassbender).
Francois Duhamel Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 11:39 am

Just a few years before the start of the Civil War, two anti-slavery books became best-sellers in the United States. One was Uncle Tom's Cabin, the Harriet Beecher Stowe opus that went on to become the best-selling novel of the 19th century.

The other was a memoir with a mouthful of a title: Twelve Years a Slave: Narrative of Solomon Northup, a citizen of New-York, kidnapped in Washington City in 1841, and rescued in 1853 from a cotton plantation near the Red River in Louisiana.

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The Two-Way
11:40 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Former House Speaker Tom Foley Dies At 84

House Speaker Tom Foley (back, right) and Vice President Al Gore applaud during President Bill Clinton's State of the Union address on Jan. 24, 1994.
Ron Edmonds AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:20 pm

Former House Speaker Tom Foley, who led the chamber from 1989 to 1995, has died, according to his family. He was 84.

The Associated Press says Foley's wife, Heather, confirmed that the Washington state Democrat died at his Washington, D.C., home.

He had reportedly been in ill health in recent months.

The AP says:

"Foley became the first speaker since the Civil War to fail to win re-election in his home district.

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Business
11:23 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Google Shares Top $1,000 For First Time

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news start with Google at an all-time high.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The Internet giant shares soared to new heights this morning, topping $1,000 a share. Google reported better than expected third-quarter sales and profits, reporting a profit of nearly $3 billion during the third quarter, up nearly 40 percent from a year earlier.

It is now the fourth company trading on a major exchange to have a stock price of $1,000 or more. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Salt
11:18 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Scratch 'N' Sniff Your Way To Wine Expertise ... Or At Least More Fun

Scratch 'n' sniff technology hasn't changed much in the last few decades. So the peach cartoon still smells artificial and not what you'll find in a glass of sauvignon blanc.
Text copyright 2013 by Richard Betts. Illustrations copyright (c) 2013 by Wendy MacNaughton. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 7:58 pm

Knock wine off its pedestal. That's the goal of wine expert Richard Betts. And he has come up with a brilliant way to do it: a scratch n' sniff guide to the aromas and flavors of the wine world.

With beautiful illustrations from Wendy MacNaughton, the 10-page board book looks like it belongs with your kid's toys instead of next to The Joy of Cooking.

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Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri October 18, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of October 17, 2013

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 1:07 pm

Memoirist Cheryl Strayed edited a collection of The Best American Essays 2013. It appears at No. 11.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri October 18, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of October 17, 2013

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 1:29 pm

At No. 14, a discredited artist uncovers a mystery in B.A. Shapiro's The Art Forger.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri October 18, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of October 17, 2013

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:54 pm

I Am Malala, debuting at No. 3, is the memoir of Pakistani education activist Malala Yousafzai.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
11:03 am
Fri October 18, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of October 17, 2013

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:43 pm

Dave Eggers' cautionary tale of an all-knowing tech company, The Circle, debuts at No. 4.

NPR Bestseller List
11:03 am
Fri October 18, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of October 17, 2013

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

Interviews
11:03 am
Fri October 18, 2013

'Let's Explore': David Sedaris On His Public Private Life

David Sedaris' stories have appeared on This American Life and in The New Yorker, and have now filled seven essay collections -- most recently, Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls.
Hugh Hamrick Little, Brown and Co.

This interview was originally broadcast on April 24, 2013.

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Shots - Health News
11:01 am
Fri October 18, 2013

To Prevent HIV Infection, Couples Try Testing Together

David Lozano (left) and Kevin Kreinbring stand in front of a painting created by Lozano. The couple says they get tested for HIV together every six months.
Courtesy of David Lozano

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 11:56 am

Getting tested for HIV in the U.S. is almost always private, sometimes even secretive. Ditto for disclosing the results.

But some say the approach is outmoded at a time when many at risk for HIV — gay men — are in committed relationships.

Research shows as many as two-thirds of new HIV infections among gay men these days are within committed couples. That's very different from the days when promiscuity fueled the epidemic.

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The Thistle & Shamrock
11:00 am
Fri October 18, 2013

5 Songs That Will Shoogle Your Hurdies

"Shoogle your hurdies" is a Scottish phrase that essentially means "shake your booty."
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 1:55 pm

If music makes you shake your booty, you're sure to shoogle your hurdies to these tracks. Before you go looking for an online Scots dictionary, enjoy Fiona Ritchie's handpicked set of irresistible tracks with Eileen Ivers and Immigrant Soul from the U.S., Scotland's Capercaillie and The Chair, and from Ireland T with the Maggies and Arty McGlynn. There's no point in even trying to sit still.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:58 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Superdupertitles At Silicon Valley Opera

Pablo Helguera for NPR

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section, on Twitter @nprclassical, or on Facebook at NPR Classical.

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Movie Reviews
10:50 am
Fri October 18, 2013

At Home At Sea: Robert Redford, At His Best Alone

Robert Redford stars in All Is Lost as a solitary man struggling to make his yacht seaworthy again after it collides with a rogue shipping container adrift in the Indian Ocean.
Richard Foreman Roadside Attractions/Lionsgate

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 2:38 pm

As I watched Robert Redford acting all by himself in the superlative survival-at-sea movie All Is Lost, I suddenly realized why the setup feels so perfect: Redford is most in his element when he's alone.

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Barbershop
10:43 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Play Ball: Do Fans Have Amnesia Over Steroid Scandal?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer Jimi Izrael with us from Cleveland. But in Washington, D.C., I have Dave Zirin, sports editor at the progressive magazine The Nation, Paul Butler, law professor at Georgetown University, and what do you know, NPR editor Ammad Omar sticking around. Take it away, Jimi.

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