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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Jesse Jackson Jr. Begins Prison Term Several Days Early

Former Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. of Illinois leaves federal court in August after being sentenced to 30 months in prison. Jackson reported to prison in North Carolina several days before the Nov. 1 deadline.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 12:26 pm

Former Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. has begun his prison sentence, resolving a brief period of confusion over his status. It seems that Jackson tried to turn himself in to federal prison officials Monday — but he was four days early. The official deadline for his surrender for a 30-month prison term had been set for Friday.

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Shots - Health News
10:56 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Short-Term Insurance Skirts Health Law To Cut Costs

Health insurance that lasts less than a year may look like a deal, but there could be hidden costs.
iStockphoto.com

What a difference a day makes. Consumers who buy a health policy good for only 364 days might save hundreds of dollars in premiums, but they could also find themselves without important benefits and charged a penalty for not having insurance next year.

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The Salt
10:55 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Startups Try To Reroute Food Waste To The Hungry

Roger Gordon (left) is offered a box of bananas from a worker who was throwing away the lightly speckled fruit at Mexican Fruits in Washington, D.C. Gordon's startup, Food Cowboy, works with truckers to divert edible produce from landfills to food charities.
Serri Graslie/NPR

Originally published on Fri November 1, 2013 2:19 pm

In an alley in Northeast Washington, D.C., hundreds of pounds of produce are piled haphazardly on pallets. Mexican Fruits, a discount grocer, can't sell the fruit and vegetables inside these boxes because the food has gone soft or is lightly bruised. Some will be donated, but most boxes are destined for a large, green Dumpster nearby.

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Money Coach
10:50 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Don't Waste Your Rainy Day Fund At The Beach

During the government shutdown, thousands of people with stable jobs suddenly found themselves without paychecks and scraping to get by. NPR Senior Business editor Marilyn Geewax talks with host Michel Martin about why rainy day funds are important, and how to create one.

Author Interviews
10:45 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Poet Nikki Giovanni On The Darker Side Of Her Life

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 12:10 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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U.S.
10:45 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Sandy Relief: Still Rebuilding A Year Later

One year ago, Superstorm Sandy battered the northeastern coast causing massive damage to homes and businesses. But how does the recovery look today? Host Michel Martin speaks to WNYC reporter Stephen Nessen and New Jersey relief volunteer Jim Davis to find out.

Parenting
10:45 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Pocahontas And Gangstas: Has Halloween Gotten Too PC?

Each year, Halloween brings out the funny, scary and sometimes racist costumes. This year, a young man is getting criticized for wearing blackface to portray slain Florida teen Trayvon Martin. Our diverse panel of parents gives their take on when dress-up goes too far.

The Two-Way
10:10 am
Tue October 29, 2013

READ: Bipartisan Bill To End NSA's Domestic Bulk Collection

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 10:29 am

Bipartisan concern on Capitol Hill about data from Americans' phone and Internet records being vacuumed up by the National Security Agency has led to an unusual alliance involving a prominent House Republican and a veteran Senate Democrat.

NPR's Larry Abramson writes that:

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The Two-Way
10:10 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Police Seek Suspects In Tiananmen Car Crash

A police officer stands on an avenue outside Tiananmen Square in Beijing, on Tuesday.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 2:14 pm

On Monday, a car crashed into Beijing's Tiananmen Square. The Guardian reports that police said the vehicle "burst into flames" after crashing into a guardrail, leaving five dead and 38 people injured.

As you might expect, the square — the site of China's 1989 pro-democracy protests — is full of security, so it wasn't long before authorities clamped down on coverage.

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All Tech Considered
9:53 am
Tue October 29, 2013

How You Handle Screen, Technology Time With Your Kids

Among families with children age 8 and under, ownership of tablet devices has jumped fivefold since 2011, reports the nonprofit Common Sense Media.
Jeremy Hiebert Flickr

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 12:00 pm

Smartphones and tablets. You can't miss them, and your kids can't resist them. Even the smallest children — 40 percent of kids 8 years old and under — have used their parents' mobile devices, according to a survey out this week by the nonprofit Common Sense Media.

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Shots - Health News
9:37 am
Tue October 29, 2013

How A Wandering Brain Can Help People Cope With Pain

A brain that can let other thoughts bubble up despite being in pain might help its owner benefit from meditation or other cognitive therapies.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 4:17 pm

When some people are in pain, the experience is so intense that they can't think of anything else. But others can turn their minds elsewhere and feel better.

Why? The difference may be due in part to brain wiring, researchers say, and knowing more about how it works may someday make it easier to match people with effective pain treatments.

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Code Switch
9:24 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Talk To The Head Honcho; He Speaks Japanese

The Japanese army presses forward in the Pacific theater during World War II.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 11:47 am

Picture the "head honcho" of an organization and what comes to mind are boardrooms, power and wealth, an individual at the top of his or her game.

But where did the word "honcho" originate? While the word is often mistakenly believed to have Spanish origins, it actually traces its roots to American soldiers who fought in the Pacific during World War II.

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The Two-Way
9:15 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Consumer Confidence Fell Sharply This Month; Shutdown Blamed

A "For Sale" sign outside a home in the Wicker Park neighborhood of Chicago on Monday.
Scott Olson Getty Images

The 16-day partial shutdown of the federal government and the wrangling in Washington over the nation's finances combined to shake consumers' confidence sharply in October, the private Conference Board reported Tuesday morning.

Its widely watched consumer confidence index dropped to 71.2 from 80.2 in September.

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Monkey See
8:49 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Present Tense: Allie Brosh, Donald Glover, And Hurting Right Now

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 4:58 pm

There is much to praise about Allie Brosh's wonderful blog Hyperbole And A Half, perhaps the greatest gift the crude, blocky graphics of MS Paint have ever given us. Brosh's posts are hugely evocative, gut-bustingly funny, and startlingly inventive in using simple drawings in ways that allow for pauses and comic timing, not to mention things like blur effects that represent ... well, sugar-fueled madness.

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The Two-Way
8:26 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Sriracha Factory Under Fire For Fumes; City Sues

Bill Hogan Chicago Tribune/MCT/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 12:16 pm

Complaints from nearby residents about "burning eyes, irritated throats and headaches" have led the city of Irwindale, Calif., to ask a judge to order the company that makes Sriracha hot sauce to suspend production.

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The Two-Way
8:22 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Police Arrest 90 After Second Night Of Violent Protests In Brazil

People ride bikes by a car on fire in a highway in Sao Paulo on Tuesday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 11:12 am

During a second night of violent protests, police in São Paulo arrested 90 people. NPR's Lourdes Garcia Navarro reports that since protests flared this summer, confrontations with police in Brazil's two largest cities — São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro — have happened almost daily.

Reporting from São Paulo, Lourdes sent this report to our Newscast unit:

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It's All Politics
8:11 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Tuesday Political Mix: Obamacare Official In The Batter's Box

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, (who we're sure was not intentionally making the "choke" sign) and Marilyn Tavenner, head of the HHS agency that oversaw the Obamacare website project.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 8:39 am

Good Tuesday morning, fellow political junkies.

As you go through your day, keep this in mind: at least you're not Marilyn Tavenner. When critics of the Obama administration's botched launch of the Affordable Care Act call for heads to metaphorically roll, Tavenner, the top official of the Health and Human Services agency that oversaw the ill-fated website project, is high on that list.

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Favorite Sessions
7:03 am
Tue October 29, 2013

opbmusic Presents: Modern Kin

Modern Kin performs live for opbmusic.
Nathan Tang opbmusic

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:15 am

To know where Modern Kin is coming from now, it helps to know where its members have been. The Portland trio — made up of Drew Grow, Kris Doty and Jeremiah Hayden — contains three-quarters of Drew Grow & The Pastors' Wives, a band noted for the loose, rollicking gospel fervor of its live shows over the past four years.

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History
7:03 am
Tue October 29, 2013

That's Not What She Said? 7 Quotes You May Be Getting Wrong

Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 10:40 am

NPR's Scott Horsley reported Monday on questions about a famous quote attributed to the late Winston Churchill. Did the former British prime minister say it? Take this interactive quiz to find out — and see if you can find the correct speaker for other famous comments.

Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Rebecca Walker Hurries Love In 'Adé'

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 2:05 pm

Rarely as the rush of romance felt so, well, rushed as it does in Rebecca Walker's maiden novel Adé: A Love Story. It's a wild ride along with an unnamed (more on that later) biracial college student who's traveling through Africa with her white best friend. Our unnamed narrator falls in love with a Swahili man she meets on an island just off the Kenyan coast, grows apart from her friend and closer to her lover's family, and must struggle with the brutal realities of life under brutal Kenyan leader Daniel arap Moi — all in 112 short pages.

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The Two-Way
5:57 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Red Sox Lead Series 3-2, But .733 Is The Stunning Number

Big Papi is red hot: Boston's David Ortiz has driven the Red Sox to a 3-2 lead over the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series.
Rob Carr Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 7:30 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Goldman talks with Steve Inskeep about the Series

The headline from Monday night is that the Boston Red Sox beat the St. Louis Cardinals by the score of 3-1 to take a 3-2 lead in the best-of-seven World Series.

Game 6, which could make the Red Sox the world champions, is Wednesday night in Boston. It starts just after 8 p.m. ET and will be broadcast on Fox. If the Cardinals win Wednesday, Game 7 would be played in Boston Thursday night.

For us, the eye-popping number of the Series so far is .733.

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Strange News
5:57 am
Tue October 29, 2013

That'll Do, Pig: Neil's Not A Hog After All

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. It's a happy ending for Neil the popular potbelly pig, who faced eviction from his California home. Pigs are allowed as pets in the town of Sierra Madre, but not hogs. An animal control officer suspected Neil was a hog - that is, a pig weighing more than 120 pounds. As one local put it, if everyone overweight was considered, half the town would be evicted.

Around the Nation
4:22 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Hosts Call Police After Their Own Party Rages Out Of Control

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

A desperate act in wartime comes when you call an air strike on your own position. This, in effect is what the hosts of a party in Eugene, Oregon had to do. More than 200 partygoers got out of hand. Even the private security couldn't handle it. Rather than wait for angry neighbors to call police, the homeowners called the cops themselves. Police did not make arrests as they broke things up. But their best professional judgment was that people looked a little drunk.

NPR Story
3:58 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Will Hard-Line Critics Scuttle Iranian Talks?

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 7:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne. Good morning.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. The diplomatic push to answer questions about Iran's nuclear program has generated some hope for a peaceful solution. It has also inspired a backlash and negative response in both Iran and the West. On both sides, conservatives who would not normally agree about much seem to agree that nuclear negotiations are a dangerous idea that could produce what they would see as a bad deal.

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NPR Story
3:58 am
Tue October 29, 2013

As Olympics Near, Bobsledder Still Fighting For A Spot

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

With 100 days left before the Winter Olympic Games begin in Sochi, Russia, the U.S. Olympic Committee begins its countdown in Times Square today. they're bringing ice and snow into the middle of Manhattan where temperatures will be in the mid-50s so the athletes can show off their skills. But in these final months, there's still a lot of scrambling to figure out which athletes get to compete in the Games.

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NPR Story
3:58 am
Tue October 29, 2013

What's A Family Supposed To Look Like?

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 7:29 am

Steve Inskeep speaks with NPR's Gene Demby and Joanna Kakissis about the recent kidnapping allegations involving a Roma couple in Greece.

All Tech Considered
1:56 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Who Has The Right To Know Where Your Phone Has Been?

Cell towers are constantly tracking the location of mobile phones. And that data, federal courts have ruled, is not constitutionally protected.
Steve Greer iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:49 am

You probably know, or should know, that your cellphone is tracking your location everywhere you go. But whether law enforcement officials should have access to that data is at the center of a constitutional debate.

Matt Blaze, a professor of computer and information science at the University of Pennsylvania, says location tracking is key to how the cell system operates.

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All Tech Considered
1:55 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Etsy's New Policy Means Some Items Are 'Handmade In Spirit'

Rae Padulo creates handmade ceramics, like these holiday ornaments, for her Etsy-based company, mudstar ceramics. She's disappointed with the site's new policy to allow outsourced manufacturing. "There's nothing wrong with factory-made," she says, but "that's not what Etsy started out to be."
Courtesy of Rae Padulo

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:49 am

Under online marketplace Etsy's new policies, vendors can now use an outside manufacturer to help make their goods.

That is not going down well with some longtime sellers, who are calling the new policies a turnaround from the site's original mission.

"Their moniker is, you know, a place to buy handmade. It doesn't say a place to buy factory-made," says Rae Padulo, a potter who began selling dishes and ornaments on Etsy in 2009.

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U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work
1:55 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Reverse Commutes Now Often A Daily Slog, Too

Reverse commuters, include Kathy LeVeque (in the foreground), wait for an approaching outbound Metra commuter train at the Mayfair neighborhood stop on Chicago's northwest side.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:49 am

It is still as dark as night as Jim Rix steps out of his red brick Chicago bungalow and gets into his car, parked on the street. It's 6 a.m., and the 53-year-old engineer is getting an early start on his 35-mile commute out to Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago's southwest suburbs.

"Depending upon weather and time of day, it can take 45 minutes to two hours to get to and from work," Rix says.

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All Tech Considered
1:54 am
Tue October 29, 2013

How Video Games Are Getting Inside Your Head — And Wallet

Austin Newman, 10, of Menlo Park, Calif., is not allowed to play video games during the school week. His mother, Michelle DeWolf, says she had to take that step to keep her son focused on his homework during the week.
Michelle DeWolf

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 11:21 am

This week on All Tech, we're exploring kids and technology with posts and radio pieces about raising digital natives. Share your thoughts and ideas in the comments, by email or tweet.

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