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Mountain Stage
2:47 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Andrew Walesch On Mountain Stage

Andrew Walesch (left) performs live on Mountain Stage with guitarist Jonathan Brown.
Josh Saul Mountain Stage

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 8:38 am

Andrew Walesch makes his first appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of the North House Folk School in Grand Marais, Minn. An in-demand singer and pianist, Walesch has earned fans across the Midwest, one jazz club and piano bar at a time.

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World Cafe
2:40 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros On World Cafe

Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros.
Myles Pettengill Courtesy of the artist

Since the moment they came together, Alex Ebert and his band Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros have had a reputation for electrifying, unifying live shows. The group has been a crowd-pleasing hitmaker since the release of its 2009 debut album, Up From Below, which features the modern classic "Home."

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All Tech Considered
2:11 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Tech Week: Twitter Takes Off, Audie Cornish In Silicon Valley

Will It Fly? The Twitter logo decorated a post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday.
Richard Drew AP

It's time for our Friday round-up of the tech and culture stories from NPR and beyond. Here we go ...

ICYMI

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The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Philadelphians Elect First Whig Since 19th Century

Robert "Heshy" Bucholz is seen in an undated photo provided by Bucholz. A member of the Modern Whig party, Bucholz campaigned door to door and beat his Democratic opponent 36-24 to earn a four-year term as an election judge in Philadelphia's Rhawnhurst section.
AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 3:46 pm

After winning an election on a platform of pragmatism and compromise, Robert "Heshy" Bucholz, 39, is set to become what many believe will be the first Whig to hold elected office in Philadelphia since before the Civil War. A member of the upstart Modern Whig Party, Bucholz won the post of judge of elections in one of the city's wards.

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Live in Concert
1:31 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Marijuana Deathsquads, Live In Concert

Marijuana Deathsquads performing live at the 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C.
NPR Music

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 10:05 am

The Minneapolis-based noise-rock band Marijuana Deathsquads has a name that implies mind-altering chaos. And that's largely what you get in the group's live performances - a thrilling, relentless bombardment of sight and sound. For this concert, originally webcast live on Nov. 6, 2013, the group's members were lost in a flickering shower of lights while blasting their way through highlights from its latest album, Oh My Sexy Lord.

Set List:

  • HAL
  • Untitled
  • Wave
  • Untitled
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The Two-Way
1:14 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

House Lawmakers Seek Federal Probe Of Black Lung Program

Two Democratic congressmen have formally asked the Labor Department's Inspector General to investigate "allegations of misconduct by doctors and lawyers working on behalf of the coal industry" and their roles in the denials of benefits for coal miners stricken with black lung disease.

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All Songs Considered
1:02 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

The Good Listener: The Right And Wrong Way To Go Solo

George Michael (left) and Andrew Ridgeley both went solo after Wham! broke up. One fared just a little better than the other.
Brian Aris

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
12:57 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Anat Cohen on Piano Jazz

Anat Cohen.
Jimmy Katz

Israel-born clarinetist and saxophonist Anat Cohen joins Marian McPartland, along with bassist Gary Mazzaroppi and drummer Glenn Davis, for a quartet edition of Piano Jazz.

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It's All Politics
12:50 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

California Congressman Wakes Up To Tough Re-Election Fight

Rep. Mike Honda speaks during the Fremont Legislative Brunch at Tesla Motors in California in May.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 5:49 pm

As a general workplace rule, it's never a good idea to fall asleep on the job. That's especially true if you're a member of Congress.

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Monkey See
12:10 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Sisters And Brothers And A Holiday TV Quiz

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

This week's show, featuring a visit from our pal Kat Chow, kicks off with a Thor-inspired discussion of the sometimes fraught world of sibling relationships. We talk about where we come from in our own sibling worlds, and then check in with fictional siblings and real-world siblings. (Stephen has concerns regarding the Jonas Brothers.)

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The Two-Way
12:06 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Toronto Mayor Advised To 'Go Away For A Couple Of Weeks'

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford on Thursday.
Mark Blinch Reuters/Landov

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, who this week has admitted to smoking crack and to being "extremely inebriated" when he was videotaped dropping F-bombs and threatening to kill someone, needs to go away for "a couple of weeks," his brother said Friday.

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It's All Politics
11:59 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Presidential Apologies: Regrets, They Have A Few

President Obama walks from the White House to Marine One on Friday. In an interview Thursday with NBC News, he apologized for breaking a promise regarding the Affordable Care Act.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:31 pm

Now that President Obama has apologized to those who've seen their health care plans canceled due to the Affordable Care Act, losses he pledged beforehand wouldn't happen, he joins the line of modern presidents who have had to look the American people in the eye and give their regrets.

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Business
11:59 am
Fri November 8, 2013

What Really Got Measured In This Month's Jobs Report?

Graphic designer Tom Sadowski, 65, works from home in Sterling, Va., in October. Many experts believe the economy is becoming too complicated for the Bureau of Labor Statistics to measure accurately using current methods.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:58 pm

In October, private employers did a lot of hiring, but a government shutdown forced hundreds of thousands of workers to stay home.

Those federal furloughs offset 204,000 jobs created last month — enough to push the unemployment rate one tick higher to 7.3 percent, the Labor Department said on Friday.

Or maybe the end of that sentence should read: the Labor Department guessed on Friday.

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Shots - Health News
11:34 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Polio In The Middle East And Africa Could Threaten Europe

A doctor vaccinates a child against polio at a health clinic in Damascus, Syria, on Nov. 6. To stop the disease from spreading beyond Syria, health officials plan to vaccinate 20 million children in the region.
Youssef Badawi EPA /LANDOV

Polio outbreaks in the Middle East and Africa could spread to Europe if precautions aren't taken, researchers say.

The recent discovery of the poliovirus in Syria, Somalia and Israel should be a wake-up call for European health officials, according to epidemiologist Martin Eichner at the University of Tuebingen in Germany.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Fri November 8, 2013

How Tall Is The Washington Monument? Surveyors Take To The Top

National Geodetic Survey crew members Roy Anderson, left, and Steve Breidenbach set up survey equipment used to measure the height of the Washington Monument.
National Geodetic Survey/NOAA

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 12:23 pm

The National Geodetic Survey doesn't often get the opportunity to take detailed measurements of the massive stone obelisk that sits in the middle of Washington, D.C.

But a 2011 earthquake in nearby Mineral, Va., damaged the Washington Monument enough that to repair it, the tower had to be wrapped in scaffolding. That gave surveyors access to the very top of the structure.

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Animals
11:30 am
Fri November 8, 2013

The Myth of the Woolly Bear

Legend holds that the length of a woolly bear caterpillar's color bands can be used to forecast how severe the winter weather will be. The myth dates back to colonial American folklore but was popularized by a 1948 study. SciFri finds out if there's any truth to the lore, and what the caterpillar's fuzzy bristles are really used for.

Science
11:29 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Biosecurity for the Age of Redesigned Life

Forget dissecting frogs and building potato batteries. High school students today are learning genetic engineering--and some are even redesigning life. Bioethicists and the FBI have taken note and are rethinking biosecurity for the synthetic biology revolution.

Your Health
11:29 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Navigating Dietary Supplement Regulations

Echinacea, vitamins, and other dietary supplements have become a $5 billion industry, but the products don't need to be pre-approved by the FDA before they go on the market. How do we know what is really in our supplements? What regulations are currently in place? How can we keep ourselves safe and informed?

Space
11:29 am
Fri November 8, 2013

India and NASA Home In on Mars

This week, India launched Mangalyaan, its first robotic mission to orbit Mars and probe its atmosphere. Only Russia, Europe, and the U.S. have successfully orbited the planet. Joan Johnson-Freese, a professor in national security affairs, and planetary scientist Bruce Jakosky discuss the Indian space program, as well as NASA's upcoming mission to the Martian atmosphere.

The Two-Way
11:26 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Poet Pablo Neruda Was Not Poisoned, Officials In Chile Say

Chilean writer and diplomat Pablo Neruda died from prostate cancer, not poison, officials say. He was serving as Chile's ambassador to France in 1971 when he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature.
STF AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:57 pm

It was prostate cancer, not an assassin's poison, that killed poet Pablo Neruda, officials in Chile announced Friday. The Nobel laureate's body was exhumed for testing this spring, due to claims from an employee and Neruda's family that the Chilean poet had been murdered at age 69.

From The Santiago Times:

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Barbershop
11:11 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Should Jonathan Martin 'Man Up' Or 'Leave It On The Field?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Arts & Life
11:11 am
Fri November 8, 2013

St. Louis Master: 'Diversity Is Big In Chess'

St. Louis might be known for legendary entertainers like Josephine Baker, or star athletes like Yogi Berra, but now there's something else putting the city on the map. It's known as the 'Chess Capital of the World.' Host Michel Martin learns more from St. Louis native and chess National Master, Charles Lawton.

Education
11:11 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Getting To The Root Of The Problems In School Districts

Host Michel Martin continues the conversation surrounding Missouri's controversial school transfer policy with Don Marsh of St. Louis Public Radio; Ty McNichols, who leads the city's Normandy School District; and Eric Knost, Superintendent of Mehlville School District.

Education
11:11 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Is St. Louis' School Transfer Program 'A Mess?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We are in St. Louis, Missouri today for a special broadcast from St. Louis Public Radio. We're going to be giving you a bit of St. Louis flavor. In a few minutes, we will talk about one of the city's biggest bragging rights. Hint, it has nothing to do with swinging a bat or throwing a ball.

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Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
11:02 am
Fri November 8, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of November 7, 2013

Hyperbole and a Half cover

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:29 pm

Allie Brosh's Hyperbole and a Half, debuting at No. 1, features stories and drawings from her blog.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
11:02 am
Fri November 8, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of November 7, 2013

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:41 pm

In The Dinner, appearing at No. 12, Herman Koch writes of two families shaken by their sons' crime.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
11:02 am
Fri November 8, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of November 7, 2013

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:32 pm

The Death of Santini, Pat Conroy's memoir of reconciling with his estranged father, debuts at No. 6.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
11:02 am
Fri November 8, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of November 7, 2013

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:26 pm

Debuting at No. 11, S. is J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst's tale of a mysterious author and two readers.

NPR Bestseller List
11:02 am
Fri November 8, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of November 7, 2013

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

All Songs Considered
10:53 am
Fri November 8, 2013

The 2013 Mountain Oasis Festival In GIFs

Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor, performing live at the 2013 Mt. Oasis festival.
Adam Kissick NPR Music

Late this past month, the first-ever Mountain Oasis music festival popped up in Asheville, N.C. for three days and nights of glorious weirdness. Officially called the Mountain Oasis Electronic Music Summit, the event featured bands both big (Nine Inch Nails) and small (Adventure Club), thrilling audiences with thumping dance, mind-blowing electronic, fist-pounding rock and more.

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