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The Two-Way
8:31 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Snowden's Flight To Russia May Not Have Been Such A Shock

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 11:33 am

Did "NSA leaker" Edward Snowden really surprise Russian officials when he showed up at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport on June 23?

Maybe not.

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Tue August 27, 2013

STUNNING VIDEO: Pilots' View Of California's Rim Fire

A view of California's Rim Fire from the cockpit of a California Air National Guard tanker plane.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 1:05 pm

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Africa
6:14 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Woman In Kenya To Marry 2 Men

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Polygamy is fairly common in Kenya, but one forthcoming marriage is turning that custom on its head. A Kenyan woman, not wanting to choose between the two men she loves, decided to marry both of them. The men have agreed, and the trio even signed a contract to, quote, "set boundaries and keep the peace."

As one of the men said of his soon-to-be-wife, she is the referee. She can say whether she wants me or my colleague. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:13 am
Tue August 27, 2013

'Syrian Regime Is Responsible,' White House Says Of Attack

In Aleppo, Syria, on Monday, this Free Syrian Army fighter stood in the rubble of a building that has collapsed during fighting there.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 12:18 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': Diplomat Frederic Hof speaks with David Greene about the crisis in Syria

(We added a new top to this post at 1:15 p.m. ET.)

"Anyone who approaches this logically" would conclude that the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad is responsible for last week's chemical weapons attack near Damascus that reportedly left hundreds dead and thousands more injured, White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters early Tuesday afternoon.

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Around the Nation
5:52 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Cafe Customers Complain About Early Christmas Music

Shoppers always complain the Christmas season begins earlier every year. And this year, those lunching at Pret A Manger cafes in New York City were treated to Christmas carols starting last week. Only the location in Rockefeller Center managed to override the apparently mistaken holiday tunes coming from corporate headquarters.

Latin America
4:02 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Thousands Of Striking Teachers Disrupt Mexico City

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:17 am

The teachers are protesting education changes that would institute evaluations and reduce the power of unions in hiring educators. It's common practice for teachers in Mexico to buy and sell tenured positions. The protests in Mexico City have caused traffic mayhem, and at one point blocked access to the international airport.

Sports
4:02 am
Tue August 27, 2013

USA Swimming To Review Sexual Misconduct Prevention Program

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The sport of swimming is back in the news, with new questions being raised about whether swimming has effectively confronted a sexual abuse problem, a problem that's been revealed in recent years. USA Swimming - the sport's governing body in this country - announced an independent review of Safe Sport, their organization's program to protect athletes from sexual abuse. NPR's Tom Goldman reports.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: In the spring of 2010, swimming's secrets emerged in a flurry of media reports.

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Around the Nation
4:02 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Residents Of Hot Weather States Sweat Air Conditioning Bills

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Air conditioning is increasingly becoming a necessity, not a luxury, as the number of Americans living in the Sunbelt grows. In Arizona, many people are struggling to keep up with their utility bills. The federal government does have an energy assistance program, but funding is shrinking, and it favors cold weather states that need heating help.

From member station KJZZ in Phoenix, Jude Joffe-Block reports.

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The Salt
2:03 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Turning Off The Spigot In Western Kansas Farmland

An irrigation pivot waters a corn field in Nebraska. Many farmers in Nebraska and Kansas rely on irrigation to water their corn fields. But the underground aquifer they draw from will run dry.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 1:49 pm

Across the High Plains, many farmers depend on underground stores of water, and they worry about wells going dry. A new scientific study of western Kansas lays out a predicted timeline for those fears to become reality. But it also shows an alternative path for farming in Kansas: The moment of reckoning can be delayed, and the impact softened, if farmers start conserving water now.

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Europe
2:01 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Beachgoers In Spain Face Invasion Of Jellyfish

Marine biologist Stefano Piraino thinks overfishing is one of the reasons jellyfish populations are growing. He said if you take fish out of the oceans, it leaves more food for jellyfish. The jellyfish here are known as Pelagia noctiluca, the mauve stinger.
Courtesy of Stefano Piraino MED-JELLYRISK

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 1:01 pm

Blue turquoise waves lap at white sand on the Spanish island of Formentera in the Mediterranean Sea. Sweaty tourists from all over Europe cram the beach. But on this particular afternoon, no one dares take a cool dip in the water.

The reason? It's what Spaniards call "medusas" — named after the monster from Greek mythology, with a woman's face and venomous snakes for hair. In English, they're called jellyfish.

Gabrielle Amand's son was a recent victim of one. He's wrapped in a towel, sitting under an umbrella on the shore.

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The March On Washington At 50
2:00 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Clarence B. Jones: A Guiding Hand Behind 'I Have A Dream'

Clarence B. Jones this month in Palo Alto, Calif. As Martin Luther King Jr.'s attorney and adviser, Jones contributed to many of King's speeches, including his famous speech at the March on Washington in 1963.
Norbert von der Groeben Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:59 pm

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream Speech" Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capital from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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The Salt
2:00 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Tortellini, The Dumpling Inspired By Venus' Navel

Even in Sandro Botticelli's painting The Birth of Venus, the goddess's belly resembles a plump, firm tortellino.
Wikimedia.org

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 3:38 pm

Tortellini — small circles of rolled dough folded around a filling — are one of the most renowned members of the Italian pasta family. In the land of their birth, the region near the Italian city of Bologna, they're strictly served as broth-like dumplings.

Possibly no foodstuff in Italian cuisine is surrounded by so much history and lore.

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Music Interviews
1:03 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Goodie Mob: Building New Leaders From The Elders

Goodie Mob, left to right: Cee-Lo, T-Mo, Big Gipp, Khujo.
Bridger Clements Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:01 pm

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Planet Money
11:16 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

A College Kid, A Single Mom, And The Problem With The Poverty Line

Marion Matthew is a home health aide supporting herself and her 17-year-old son.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:02 am

The College Kid

Rico Saccoccio is a junior at Fordham University in the Bronx. He's from a middle-class family in Connecticut and he spent the summer living at home with his parents, who cover about $15,000 a year in his college costs.

According to the U.S. government, Saccoccio is living in poverty. The $8,000 he earns doing odd jobs puts him well below the $11,945 poverty threshold for an individual. In fact, the U.S. Census Bureau recently reported that more than half of all college students who are living off campus and not at home are poor.

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The Two-Way
6:24 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Justice Backs Less Protective Ruling On Reporter Privilege

In a case closely watched by the intelligence community and the media, the Justice Department urged a federal appeals court on Monday to leave in place a court ruling that gives reporters little protection from testifying against their sources in criminal prosecutions.

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It's All Politics
5:25 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

For Obama, Outrage Over Syria Is The Easy Part

A young girl receives treatment at a makeshift hospital in Damascus, Syria, after a suspected chemical weapons attack by the military.
AP

The present Syrian crisis ranks among the most vexing moments of President Obama's presidency.

The recent heart-rending images of Syrian civilians, many of them young children apparently killed by chemical weapons used by the government of Bashar Assad, have raised the volume on calls for the president to act.

But while there's a clarity to the outrage itself, for Obama things quickly get murky.

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The March On Washington At 50
4:48 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Sleepy, Southern And Segregated: What D.C. Was Like In '63

Charter bus passengers look for their transportation home after the March on Washington of Aug. 28, 1963.
AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:30 pm

Fifty years ago this week, when hundreds of thousands of demonstrators came from across the country to take part in the 1963 March on Washington, the city was not yet the cosmopolitan capital that it arguably is today.

But it was a mecca for African-Americans, says historian Marya McQuirter.

"Washington was definitely a different city 50 years ago," she says, "for a number of reasons. By 1957, it had become the largest majority black city in the country."

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The Salt
4:48 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

'Braai Day' Aims To Bring S. Africans Together Over Barbecue

Jan Scannell, former accountant, has taken on a new identity as "Jan Braai," a South African TV show host and media personality promoting the idea of National Braai (barbecuing) Day, celebrated each year on Sept. 24.
Courtesy of Stephanus Rabie

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:30 pm

Nelson Mandela is officially "improving," though still in critical condition at a South African hospital. His long battle with a lung infection has South Africans anxiously contemplating their "post-Mandela" future in a still racially divided country. In a unique strategy, one man is hoping to help heal those divisions with a pair of barbecue tongs.

Jan Scannell is a 32-year-old former accountant with a dream: To establish a national holiday in South Africa like July 4 called Braai Day.

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The Two-Way
4:39 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

2 Excerpts You Should Read From Kerry's Speech About Syria

Secretary of State John Kerry speaks on Syria at the State Department in Washington, D.C, on Monday.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Secretary of State John Kerry gave a rare and pointed speech in which he sent a clear message to the Syrian regime of Bashar Assad that the use of chemical weapons defied "any code of morality."

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Law
4:15 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Embattled LA Sheriff Still Plans To Give Fifth Term A Shot

Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca at the Men's Central Jail in downtown LA in 2012. Baca, who has been under fire for jailhouse abuses, is facing calls to step down and not seek a fifth term.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:30 pm

Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca — who oversees the largest municipal jail system in the country — is facing growing pressure to bow out of the race for what could be his fifth term.

There's a lot that's been piling up against Sheriff Baca lately. At the top of the list is an FBI probe into what's been described as a systemic pattern of unnecessary force against inmates in county jails.

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The Two-Way
4:10 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Which U.S. Agencies Have Taken The Most Furlough Days?

In May, the Housing and Urban Development agency closed for a day, as employees were placed on furlough. The HUD and other agencies were reportedly forced to take a fraction of the furlough days that had been threatened earlier in 2013.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 8:36 am

The threat of furloughs loomed large early in 2013, when mandatory budget cuts seemed certain to force federal workers to skip anywhere from 10 to 22 days of work without pay this year. A new tally by Federal News Radio shows that many agencies have taken fewer than half the days they had predicted.

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Shots - Health News
3:59 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Dengue Fever Pops Up In Florida

Dengue fever cases have cropped up in southern Florida.
CDC

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 7:31 am

Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne illness, is back in Florida.

A handful of cases have been confirmed in Martin and St. Lucie counties in the past week. The cases there prompted a public health alert. Another case was seen in Miami-Dade, where officials issued a mosquito-borne disease advisory.

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Education
3:55 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

There's Not Enough Work For Veterinarians

There are way more veterinarians than there is work for them to do, according to a recent survey by the American Veterinary Medical Association.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:30 pm

There are way more veterinarians than there is work for them to do, according to a recent survey by the American Veterinary Medical Association, as the nation's veterinary schools continue to crank out graduates.

A report from the American Veterinary Medical Association estimates the supply exceeds the demand by the equivalent of 11,250 full-time vets.

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Sports
3:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Was 1973 'Battle Of The Sexes' Tennis Match Thrown?

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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Strange News
3:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Finns Dominate Mobile Phone Throwing World Championship

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And we wrap up this week's All Tech Considered with a story out of Finland.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This past weekend, 80 people from six countries competed in the annual Mobile Phone Throwing World Championships. The Finns shut out the competition, winning first, second and third place overall.

SIEGEL: The top tosser threw his handheld device an impressive 320 feet. The top woman on the field was a 31-year-old Swede - Asa Lundgren. Her distance: 132 feet. She's a newcomer to the sport but threw javelin in her youth.

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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Juliana Hatfield And Matthew Caws Unite As 'Minor Alps'

Juliana Hatfield and Matthew Caws are Minor Alps. (Minor Alps)

This week, NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson introduces us to the band Minor Alps.

The band is made up of singer-songwriter Juliana Hatfield and Matthew Caws, the lead singer of the power-pop band Nada Surf.

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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Retiring To The Farm Anything But Quiet

Jim Schulte and his wife, Rita, bought their 450-acre farm near Columbia, Mo., in 1991, but didn’t start farming full time until Jim finished working in the mortgage business. (Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media)

It’s not just lifelong farmers who feel the pull of the land as they get older. For some Americans, retirement is an opportunity to begin the farming dream.

“I wanted to be able to be active and have a pastime that ensured physical activity,” said beginning farmer Tom Thomas, who at 65 still has the physical fitness to wrestle and brand steers at his son’s ranch in Oklahoma.

Thomas retired two years ago after teaching exercise physiology for 35 years and he knew what he wanted to do next.

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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

How Far Have We Come Since The March On Washington?

Demonstrators march towards the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial during the 50th anniversary commemoration of the 1963 March on Washington Saturday, Aug. 24, 2013, in Washington. (Jose Luis Magana/AP)

Thousands of people streamed onto the National Mall in Washington this past weekend, as part of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

On Wednesday, the actual anniversary of the event, thousands will gather at the Lincoln Memorial for what organizers are calling a “commemoration and call to action.”

So what has and hasn’t been achieved between 1963 and now, particularly for black Americans?

NPR’s Gene Demby has been thinking about this. He writes about race, ethnicity and culture as part of the network’s Code Switch team.

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The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

U.N. Will Talk To U.S. About Spying Claims

The United Nations says it will talk to the United States about a report that it spied on the communications of diplomats.

Reuters reports:

"'We're aware of the reports and we intend to be in touch with the relevant authorities on this,' U.N. spokesman Farhan Haq told reporters.

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