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Economy
4:03 pm
Sat September 21, 2013

Stuck In Poverty Amid Signs Of Recovery

Food distributed by the Manna Food Center is packed in cardboard boxes to be loaded into clients' cars.
Chloe Coleman NPR

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 4:45 pm

For the third year in a row, the poverty rate has remained stuck at about 15 percent. Nearly one in six Americans was living in poverty in 2012, according to a new report by the Census Bureau. Despite a slow-moving economic recovery, these latest numbers show that for poor Americans, there are few signs of any recovery.

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Media
4:03 pm
Sat September 21, 2013

Westerly Weekends: 'All Things Considered' Shifts Viewpoint

The weekend broadcast of All Things Considered has moved to Los Angeles. This view of the city comes from from Griffith Observatory.
Ray_from_LA/Flickr

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 4:45 pm

Like many pioneers before it, All Things Considered has moved west. On Saturdays and Sundays, the show will air from NPR studios in Culver City, Calif., with a new host, Arun Rath.

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Pop Culture
4:03 pm
Sat September 21, 2013

An Introduction To What's New And What's Next

A Japanese micro-bar only has room for four customers at a time.
Will Robb

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 4:45 pm

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The Two-Way
12:24 pm
Sat September 21, 2013

North Korea Cancels Plans For Cross-Border Family Reunions

South Korean Cho Jang-geum, 81, weeps as she fills out an application to reunite with family members who live in North Korea, at the headquarters of the Korean Red Cross in Seoul Saturday. North Korea announced today that it is indefinitely postponing the reunions of families who were separated by the 1950-53 Korean War. The meetings were to take place in the coming week.
Park Dong-ju AP

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 2:54 pm

A chance for families in South and North Korea to meet their long-lost relatives has been put off indefinitely, as North Korea canceled reunions that were to take place in the coming week. A South Korean official called the decision "inhumane" Saturday.

"The North's postponement shattered the thrill and hopes of nearly 200 families overnight and deserves denunciation as an inhumane act," Unification Ministry spokesman Kim Eyi-do said, according to The Korea Herald.

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The Two-Way
11:38 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Bombings Kill Dozens Of Mourners At Baghdad Funeral

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 3:04 pm

In Baghdad's Sadr City, a bombing attack that struck during a funeral has killed dozens of people, with the death toll continuing to rise Saturday. Multiple reports are citing at least 65 deaths in the attack, one of several in Iraq today.

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NPR Story
10:05 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Linda Ronstadt, Charles Manson And Robbie Fulks

Linda Ronstadt performs in 1970.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 11:15 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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NPR Story
10:01 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Deadly Shooting In Nairobi Mall

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 10:34 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. An upscale shopping mall in Nairobi is the scene of a deadly standoff.

(SOUNDBITE OF SCREAMING AND CRYING)

SIMON: Kenyan armed forces are battling gunmen who stormed that mall earlier today. The Red Cross says that at least 20 people have been killed in the attack. NPR's Gregory Warner is on the scene. Greg, thanks for being with us.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Thanks, Scott.

SIMON: And what's the latest?

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Syria Meets Deadline On Chemical Weapons; Fighting Continues

A rebel fighter cleans his weapon in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo Friday. Syria's civil war continues, even as the country follows a schedule of releasing information on its chemical weapons program.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 10:44 am

Syria has delivered documents about its arsenal of chemical weapons, meeting a deadline set in the framework agreement between the U.S. and Russia that was announced Sept. 14. The deal calls for destroying all of the weapons by June of 2014. But the country's civil war is showing no sign of slowing down.

Saying that it was confirming Syria's "expected" disclosure, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons announced Saturday that its technical teams are "currently reviewing the information received."

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Code Switch
7:10 am
Sat September 21, 2013

What Did Your Parents Tell You About Race?

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 5:48 pm

Earlier this week, a school in Hartford, Conn., made headlines after parents complained about its, uh, novel approach at making America's racial history resonate with seventh graders.

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The Two-Way
7:04 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Hostages Trapped Inside Nairobi Shopping Mall

A line of soldiers from the Kenya Defense Forces runs around the front of the Westgate Mall in Nairobi this morning.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 5:28 am

Updated Sunday 5:46 a.m. ET


The death toll at an upscale shopping mall in Nairobi has increased to at least 52, and civilians are still inside as militants exchange sporadic barrages of gunfire with Kenyan security troops outside.

"The priority is to save as many lives as possible," Joseph Lenku, Kenya's Interior cabinet secretary told AP early today. Kenyan forces have already rescued about 1,000 people, he said.

He said that five to 15 attackers are involved in the standoff, but declined to estimate the number of hostages.

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Tiny Desk Concerts
7:03 am
Sat September 21, 2013

The Cristina Pato Trio: Tiny Desk Concert

Cristina Pato Trio performs a Tiny Desk Concert in June 2013.
Hayley Bartels NPR

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 5:09 pm

After nearly a decade spent living in the city, Cristina Pato is a full-fledged New Yorker. But her first home is the place where Spain meets the Celtic world: Galicia.

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Education
6:46 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Being Head Chef In A Theatrical Test Kitchen

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 10:34 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. And now...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Five, six, seven, eight.

SIMON: In the world of American theater, there's Broadway, off-Broadway, the Goodman and the Guthrie, and then Harry S. Truman High in Levittown, Pennsylvania, where for four decades a drama legend named Lou Volpe has provided a kind of theatrical test kitchen for famous, even edgy shows before they become considered classics in high school theater programs.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSICAL, "A CHORUS LINE")

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Middle East
6:46 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Syria Agreement Makes For Unstable Alliances

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 10:34 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Yesterday, Syria sent the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons an initial declaration, detailing its trove of chemical weapons. The declaration is now being reviewed by that organization's verification division. The U.S.-Russian agreement reached last weekend calls for inspectors to be on the ground in Syria by November, and all chemical weapons to be removed from the country or destroyed by the middle of next year.

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Movie Interviews
6:45 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Isaiah Washington, Taking On A Killer Of A Character

Isaiah Washington (left) plays a sort of fatal father figure to Tequan Richmond's Lee in Blue Caprice. The characters are inspired by the so-called Beltway snipers, who killed 10 people in and around Washington, D.C., in 2002.
IFC Films

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 12:06 pm

The motion picture Blue Caprice seems to be about a boy who's been abandoned by his mother and aches for a father. He meets a man who can no longer see his own children, and who longs for a son. They find each other — but what follows is anything but a happy ending.

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Politics
6:45 am
Sat September 21, 2013

New York's Next Mayor, Bound To Be A Brooklynite

Republican mayoral hopeful Joe Lhota speaks at a news conference Monday.
Frank Franklin II AP

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 3:04 pm

This week, the center of New York City's political universe was downtown Brooklyn.

With the dust settling from the mayoral primary, the two candidates who will be on the ballot to replace outgoing Mayor Michael Bloomberg both live in the city's biggest borough.

On Thursday, Republican candidate Joe Lhota shook hands with voters pouring out of the subway a few blocks from his home in Brooklyn Heights.

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Politics
6:45 am
Sat September 21, 2013

What's Next In The Congressional Budget Showdown?

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, speaks at a Republican rally Friday after the House passed a measure that would temporarily fund the government while crippling President Obama's health care law. The Senate is not expected to follow suit.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 10:34 am

The House has passed a stopgap spending bill that would keep the government open through Dec. 15. It passed almost entirely along party lines: In addition to funding the government, it calls for defunding of the Affordable Care Act.

The White House has said President Obama would veto the bill, were it to come to his desk in this form. And it most likely won't. Democrats, who control the Senate, won't pass a bill that defunds Obamacare.

Which raises the question, now what?

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NPR Story
6:45 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Art Dealer Pleads Guilty To Selling Fraudulent Paintings

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 9:43 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. This week, an art dealer named Glafira Rosales pleaded guilty to wire fraud, money laundering and tax evasion after she admitted that she sold paintings that she claimed were by Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Willem de Kooning to a couple of Manhattan galleries.

They were actually painted by an artist living in Queens. Those paintings sold for $80 million. I'm joined now from New York by Jerry Saltz, senior art critic for New York magazine. Thanks very much for being with us.

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NPR Story
6:45 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Cities Race To The Top Of The Ferris Wheel

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 10:34 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Las Vegas is set to claim the title for the world's largest Ferris Wheel. It completed it's 550 foot tall high roller last week. But New York City plans for an even taller one, 625 feet, and rumor has it Dubai may be planning an even taller Ferris Wheel, but Chicago can always claim the first and definitive Ferris Wheel, so named because it was George Ferris himself who designed it for the 1893 World's Fair.

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NPR Story
6:45 am
Sat September 21, 2013

NFL Treats Hard Hits With A Light Touch

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 10:34 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Know what gets me through the week? The chance to say, time for sports!

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

SIMON: Football season is back with a kathunk(ph). Plus, the first two teams have qualified for the Major League Baseball playoffs, and the WMBA playoffs are on. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us. Good morning, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hiya, Scott.

SIMON: Thanks so much for being with us.

GOLDMAN: A pleasure.

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It's All Politics
6:33 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Obamacare Stars As Villain In Alabama Special Election

Wells Griffith

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PG-13: Risky Reads
6:03 am
Sat September 21, 2013

For Shy Girl, Poe's Rapping And Tapping Inspired More Than Fear

Marius G. Sipa iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 3:16 pm

Koren Zailckas' latest book is the novel Mother, Mother.

The fourth grade blessed me with "the cool teacher." I've long since forgotten his name, but I haven't forgotten the sound of him tearing into the teacher's parking lot every day on his Harley Davidson. In memory, Mr. Cool towered over me at six-foot-something, his death-metal hair offset by a wiry goatee, his Air Jordans a bright counterpoint to his spider web tie.

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Author Interviews
4:36 am
Sat September 21, 2013

A Road Trip Sparks An Unlikely Friendship In 'Norvelt To Nowhere'

Jack Gantos recently won the Newbery Medal, the highest award in children's literature, for his novel Dead End in Norvelt.
Anne Lower Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 10:34 am

From Norvelt to Nowhere is a book that begins in the shadow of nuclear annihilation, during the Cuban missile crisis in 1962. The first few paragraphs also disclose that nine elderly women in the town of Norvelt are dead by poison.

Did we mention it's a kids' book, too?

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The Salt
4:35 am
Sat September 21, 2013

No Schmear Job: A Brief History Of Bagels And Lox

A marriage made in New York, though both partners came with plenty of baggage.
Jerry Deutsch iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 4:35 pm

There's a certain kind of joy in breaking the overnight fast by biting into a bagel: crackling crust, chewy center, smooth and silky cream cheese, sharp smoked salmon. For some, capers and onions join the ritual.

But just who invented this breakfast staple, which has become as American as apple pie?

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Deceptive Cadence
4:31 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Leonard Bernstein's Unconventional 'Anxiety'

Leonard Bernstein's Age of Anxiety symphony is as unconventional as its creator.
Courtesy of Library of Congress

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 4:30 pm

Like Leonard Bernstein himself, there is absolutely nothing predictable about the music he wrote. None of the three amazing works Bernstein labeled as "symphonies" in any way resemble a conventional orchestral symphony.

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It's All Politics
4:29 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Have Obama's Troubles Weakened Him For Fall's Fiscal Fights?

President Obama arrives on the South Lawn of the White House on Friday.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 10:34 am

President Obama has had a tough year. He failed to pass gun legislation. Plans for an immigration overhaul have stalled in the House. He barely escaped what would have been a humiliating rejection by Congress on his plan to strike Syria.

Just this week, his own Democrats forced Larry Summers, the president's first choice to head the Federal Reserve, to withdraw.

Former Clinton White House aide Bill Galston says all these issues have weakened the unity of the president's coalition.

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The Salt
4:28 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Trader Joe's Ex-President To Turn Expired Food Into Cheap Meals

Doug Rauch wants to take wholesome food that grocers have to throw away and cook and sell it as low-cost, prepared meals.
Bunnyhero Flickr

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 4:18 pm

Here's some food for thought: One-third of the world's food goes to waste every year. In the U.S., about 40 percent of our food gets thrown out. It's happening on the farm, at the grocery store and in our own homes.

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The Two-Way
5:48 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Document Sheds New Light On The Time The U.S. Almost Nuked Itself

An atomic cloud rises July 25, 1946 during the "Baker Day" blast at Bikini Island in the Pacific.
National Archives Getty Images

"One simple, dynamo-technology, low voltage switch stood between the United States and a major catastrophe."

That is the blunt 1969 assessment of Parker F. Jones, the then supervisor of the nuclear weapons safety department at Sandia National Laboratories, in a newly declassified document that sheds light on a 1961 accident in which the United States almost nuked North Carolina.

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It's All Politics
5:35 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Not-So-Fond Memories From The Last Government Shutdowns

A sign hangs in the window of an information booth at the Lincoln Memorial in December 1995, announcing the temporary closure of the attraction due to the government shutdown.
Mark Wilson AP

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 6:38 pm

For those old enough to remember, the government shutdown skirmishing now underway in Washington brings back some not-so-fond memories of late 1995 and early 1996.

That's the last time a divided government, unable to settle its differences before the money from previous years' spending bills ran out, forced dozens of agencies to close. Some 800,000 federal workers were told to stay home and millions of Americans were shut out of everything from their national parks to small-business loans.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:19 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Not My Job: Comedian Jeff Garlin Gets Quizzed On The IgNobels

Peter Kramer Getty Images for TFF

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 9:36 am

Jeff Garlin is a Chicago-born comedian who became well-known playing Larry David's manager on Curb Your Enthusiasm. He's got a new sitcom on ABC called The Goldbergs and a new film, Dealin' with Idiots, which he wrote, directed and stars in.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:19 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Prediction

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 9:36 am

Our panelists predict what Google will do once they conquer death.

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