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The Two-Way
12:48 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Watson, IBM's 'Jeopardy!' Champ, Gets Its Own Business Division

Jeopardy! contestant Ken Jennings, who won a record 74 consecutive games, concedes to supercomputer opponent Watson in February 2011.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 5:06 am

Ever wonder what happens to all those Jeopardy! champions once they leave the stage? Watson, an IBM supercomputer, got its own business division.

You might recall that Watson, named after longtime CEO Thomas J. Watson, crushed its human opponents on the popular television game show back in February 2011.

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Code Switch
12:45 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

States May Recognize Same-Sex Marriages, But Navajo Nation Won't

The Navajo Nation prohibits marriage between persons of the same sex, and critics are now challenging that ban.
dbking/flickr

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 4:13 pm

The Navajo Nation has prohibited same-sex marriage since 2005, when the Diné Marriage Act was passed. Now, critics are challenging that ban.

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The Salt
12:13 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Is Sugar Addiction Why So Many January Diets Fail?

Indulge or resist? Sugar cravings can be a serious challenge.
iStock

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 1:34 pm

We've survived the stretch between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day, when rich, sweet treats come at us non-stop. Now is the season of reform, when gym memberships, cleanse books and weight-loss plans sell like gangbusters.

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Alt.Latino
12:06 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

A Dictator And The Music He Loved To Hate: Spanish Songs Of Rebellion

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Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 9:54 am

Martirio owes an artistic debt to both a dictator and jazz.

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The Two-Way
11:27 am
Thu January 9, 2014

French Court Rules Controversial Comedian's Show Can Go Ahead

A French court has ruled that comedian Dieudonne M'Bala M'Bala, seen here on May 13, 2009, can perform Thursday night in Nantes, France.
Remy de la Mauviniere AP

A French comedian whose performances authorities want to ban because of the act's perceived anti-Semitism has been given the go-ahead to perform in the city of Nantes, France.

A court ruled Thursday that Dieudonne M'bala M'bala's show Thursday night that will open his nationwide tour can go ahead. About 5,000 tickets have been sold for the performance.

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Monkey See
10:44 am
Thu January 9, 2014

'Parks And Recreation': Good For Nerds, Good For America

Amy Poehler as Leslie Knope and Adam Scott as Ben Wyatt on NBC's deeply pro-nerd Parks And Recreation.
Colleen Hayes NBC

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 1:56 pm

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It's All Politics
10:41 am
Thu January 9, 2014

How Long Is Too Long? Congress Revisits Mandatory Sentences

Inmates walk around a recreation yard at the Deuel Vocational Institution in Tracy, Calif., in January 2012.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 12:14 pm

Mandatory minimum prison sentences for drug dealers were once viewed as powerful levers in the nation's war against drugs, a way to target traffickers, and punish kingpins and masterminds.

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Education
10:34 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Students Of Color Don't Apply To Top Schools, But They Should

Deadlines to apply for colleges are coming up - and some experts say a lot of qualified minority students won't be applying to the top schools. Host Michel Martin speaks with Donald Fraser, Jr., of CollegeSnapps, Inc. and Caroline Hoxby, an economist at Stanford University about why some students of color aren't trying to get into prestigious schools.

Music Interviews
10:32 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Singer Maysa On Applying To Home Depot And Earning A Grammy Nomination

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 11:02 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This is the time of year when we've been talking a lot about resolutions and goals and what it takes to see them through. I think most people would agree that one of the traits successful people seem to share is the willingness to press on, even when success is not assured. Well, that could be the story of Maysa. After more than 20 years in the music business, she has been nominated for a Grammy this year in the category of Best Traditional R&B Performance.

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The Two-Way
10:10 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Aurora Watchers 'May Be In Luck' As Solar Flare Reaches Earth

A coronal mass ejection (CME) exploding off the surface of the sun in an image captured Tuesday by the European Space Agency and NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 4:32 pm

Update at 3:05 p.m. ET:

NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center now reports:

"The coronal mass ejection (CME), originally expected to arrive around 0800 UTC (3:00 a.m. EST) today, January 9, was observed at the ACE spacecraft just upstream of Earth at 1932 UTC (2:32 p.m. EST)."

The SWPC goes on to say that "the original forecast continues to be for G3 (Strong) Geomagnetic Storm activity on January 9 and 10."

"Aurora watchers may be in luck for tonight."

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The Two-Way
10:09 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Pakistani Teen Dies Stopping Bomber From Striking School

Pakistani security personnel examine the site of a suicide bombing in the Ibrahimzai area of Hangu, Pakistan, on Monday. The bombing killed 15-year-old Aitizaz Hasan, who prevented the bomber from attacking a school.
Basit Shah AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 11:02 am

A teenager who was killed after reportedly stopping a suicide bomber at a school in northwest Pakistan is being hailed as a hero.

Aitizaz Hasan, 15, was late for school on Monday and as a punishment wasn't allowed to attend assembly, the Express Tribune newspaper said.

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Parallels
10:01 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Rare Horses Released In Spain As Part Of 'Rewilding' Effort

Two-dozen Retuerta horses, the second of two batches, are released into the Campanarios de Azaba Biological Reserve in western Spain. The animals' DNA closely resembles that of the ancient wild horses that once roamed this area before the Romans began domesticating them more than 2,000 years ago.
Lauren Frayer NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 6:36 pm

For the first time in two millennia, wild horses are once again galloping free in western Spain, countering what happened when the Romans moved there and domesticated the animals.

Four-dozen Retuerta horses have been released into the wild in western Spain over the past two years as part of a project by Rewilding Europe, a nonprofit group that seeks to turn the loss of rural farming life into an opportunity to boost biodiversity.

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The Two-Way
10:01 am
Thu January 9, 2014

While U.S. Shivers, Australia And Brazil Sizzle

At the Australian Bat Clinic in Queensland, 15 baby flying foxes (bats) were lined up and ready to be fed Thursday. They were brought there to get out of the extreme heat, which has killed hundreds of thousands of bats.
Trish Wimberley AP

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 11:18 am

Temperatures across much of the U.S. are, as forecast, finally starting to get back to something close to normal after several days of dangerously cold air.

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Music
10:00 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Kenny Clarke, Inventor Of Modern Jazz Drumming, At 100

Kenny Clarke in 1971.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 4:50 pm

Jan. 9 marks the 100th birthday of drummer Kenny Clarke. One of the founders of bebop, Clarke is less well-known than allies like Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk, but his influence is just as deep.

That thing that jazz drummers do — that ching-chinga-ching beat on the ride cymbal, like sleigh bells? It gives the music a light, airy, driving pulse. Clarke came up with that, and that springy shimmer came to epitomize swinging itself.

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Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Colorful Names

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

What do Vanna White, James Brown, and Ron Burgundy have in common? In this final round, puzzle guru Art Chung asks you to identify famous people or fictional characters who has a color in their name.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Happy Geek Colors

Potter and designer Jonathan Adler takes to the puzzle podium for his Ask Me Another challenge.
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

Host Ophira Eisenberg puts designer Jonathan Adler in the puzzle hot seat for a quiz all about how certain colors got their name. Does the guy who coined the word "chambeige" know which color is named after a desert-dwelling animal that also gives its hair to make overcoats? Find out.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Homophones To Phone Home About

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

What would you call a type of neck-wear worn while participating in a form of exercise founded by Billy Blanks? A "Tae Bo-bow tie"! In this game, host Ophira Eisenberg offers clues to phrases or compound words that change meaning when the words are reversed.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me What To Do

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

Unfortunately, you won't be able to duet with Carl Kasell in this game. But we encourage you to sing along and identify songs with the word "don't" in the title, as performed by house musician Jonathan Coulton. For starters, we're pretty sure that Andrew Lloyd Webber song is not called "Don't Drink That Blue Margarita."

Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Random Questions With: Jonathan Adler

Jonathan Adler in New York City.
Joshua McHugh

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

Designer Jonathan Adler's colorful, eye-popping pillows, rugs and vases adorn the interiors of many discerning homeowners, but his dream of creating a home furnishings empire was nearly deferred. Early in his career, discouragement from his pottery teacher at the Rhode Island School of Design and several unfulfilling jobs at talent agencies in New York City left Adler at his wit's end. But these events only fueled his fire to live out the pottery dream. Adler taught night classes at a pottery studio called Mud, Sweat & Tears (potter puns!) and eventually opened his own studio.

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Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Indigenous Diligence

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:28 pm

If Neapolitans are people from Naples, where do Sconnies come from? This game, led by house musician Jonathan Coulton, is all about demonyms — words that describe a person who hails from a particular geographic location.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
9:49 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Brevity Is The Soul Of Wit

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 11:48 am

In keeping with the title of this game, we'll keep this explanation short. All the answers in this game will be two-letter words. That's it!

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Favorite Sessions
9:48 am
Thu January 9, 2014

KCRW Presents: Rokia Traore

Rokia Traore performs live on KCRW.
Rob LaFond KCRW

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 2:19 pm

When Malian singer-songwriter Rokia Traore stopped by KCRW's studio, she was in the middle of a cross-country tour and bound for Northern California. The travel-ready artist is the daughter of a diplomat who has been all over the world and cites her rich cultural experiences as her source of inspiration. Singing in both English and her native language, songs like "Mama" function as a tapestry of her life.

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A Blog Supreme
9:25 am
Thu January 9, 2014

The Drummer Who Invented Jazz's Basic Beat

It doesn't take an expert to identify this sound as a jazz rhythm:

Musicians call it "spang-a-lang," for obvious phonetic reasons, and it's so synonymous with jazz, it no longer occurs to us that someone had to invent it. But someone did: a drummer named Kenny Clarke, who would have turned 100 today.

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Shots - Health News
8:58 am
Thu January 9, 2014

How Medigap Coverage Turns Medicare Into A Health Care Buffet

How about back surgery, a cardiac catheterization and an MRI scan?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 2:01 pm

Restaurants know customers eat more at fixed-price buffets than when they pay a la carte. Economists have been saying for years that the same kind of behavior goes on in the federal Medicare program for seniors and the disabled.

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The Two-Way
8:56 am
Thu January 9, 2014

The Case Against Clemency: Expert Says Snowden's Leaks Hurt Security

The National Security Agency headquarters building in Fort Meade, Md.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 10:25 am

A former NSA general counsel tells NPR's Morning Edition that Edward Snowden advertised his theft of government secrets as an act of civil disobedience and should take responsibility.

"He did the crime — he should do the time," says Stewart Baker, also a former assistant secretary of Homeland Security under President George W. Bush.

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The Two-Way
8:03 am
Thu January 9, 2014

More Slow-But-Steady News: Fewer Jobless Claims Filed

Looking for work in Florida. At a November career fair in West Palm Beach, this man had a job application in hand.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 11:15 am

There were 330,000 first-time claims filed for unemployment insurance last week, down 15,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration says.

The claims data are the last bits of evidence about how the labor market is doing before Friday's scheduled release of figures on the December unemployment rate and payroll growth.

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The Two-Way
7:04 am
Thu January 9, 2014

An 'Embarrassed And Humiliated' Gov. Christie Apologizes

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaks Thursday during a news conference Thursday at the Statehouse in Trenton, N.J.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 7:54 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': WNYC's Matt Katz talks with Renee Montagne about the New Jersey bridge scandal
  • Gov. Christie: 'I had no knowledge'
This post was updated with the latest news at 8:45 p.m. ET.

Saying he is "embarrassed and humiliated by the conduct of some people on my team," New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on Thursday apologized to the people of New Jersey for his aides' role in a scheme to punish the Democratic mayor of Fort Lee by closing lanes that lead to the George Washington Bridge.

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The Record
7:02 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Loving Morrissey The Way We Used To, Despite Lacerating 'Autobiography'

Morrissey performing in Seattle last March.
Mat Hayward FilmMagic

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 11:31 am

"Loudly and wildly the music played, always pointing to the light, to the way out, or the way in, to individualism, and to the remarkable if unsettling notion that life could possibly be lived as you might wish it to be lived."

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Around the Nation
6:20 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Vending Machine In L.A. Will Make Your Next Meal

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 9:21 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. We've reported on this program about instant meals. We cooked scrambled eggs and macaroni and cheese in a microwave, but maybe even that's too much work. Now a vending machine in L.A. makes breakfast for you - or lunch or dinner.

Krulwich Wonders...
6:08 am
Thu January 9, 2014

A Rain Forest Begins With Rain, Right? Is This A Trick Question?

MinuteEarth YouTube

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 12:50 pm

Think of a rain forest — rich with trees, covered by clouds, wet all the time.

Then ask yourself, how did this rain forest get started?

I ask, because the answer is so going to surprise you. It's not what you think.

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