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Music Interviews
2:06 am
Wed March 5, 2014

The Legend Of Linda Perhacs, 'A Most Unlikely Rock Star'

Linda Perhacs' second album, The Soul of All Natural Things, comes 44 years after an inauspicious debut that bloomed into a cult favorite.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 10:54 am

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Kitchen Window
11:13 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Salt Cod: The Prosciutto Of The Sea?

The best quality salt cod typically is sold as nearly white whole fillets, 2 or more inches thick in the thickest parts, often packed in coarse salt in wooden boxes.
Tom Gilbert for NPR

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 2:09 am

Like the God of the Old Testament, salt cod goes by many names. The French call it morue, the Italians baccala' and the Portuguese bacalhau. Of course, the fish is the same — Atlantic cod — and the process is the same — drying and salting.

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Shots - Health News
5:54 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Palliative Chemo Can Make It More Likely You'll Die In The ICU

Chemotherapy is administered to a patient at Duke Cancer Center in Durham, N.C.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 7:31 am

Cancer patients who get chemotherapy in the last months of their lives are more likely to die in the intensive care unit, rather than where they wish, a study finds.

And with more than half of all people with incurable cancer getting palliative chemotherapy in the months before they die, many people could be suffering more than needed.

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The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Teen Sues Parents, Claiming They Owe Her Money For College

Rachel Canning (right) sits with her friend Jaime Inglesino during a hearing Tuesday at the Morris County Courthouse in New Jersey.
John O'Boyle AP

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 10:56 am

A judge held an unusual hearing in New Jersey on Tuesday: a lawsuit brought by an 18-year-old who says her parents kicked her out of their house. Rachel Canning is seeking to force her parents to give her financial support and money for college, in addition to pay for tuition at her private school.

Superior Court Family Division Judge Peter Bogaard, who heard the case in Morristown, N.J., on Tuesday afternoon, denied Canning's requests in what's seen as the first round of hearings in the case.

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Economy
4:39 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Severe Weather Socks The Economy, But Full Impact Is Unclear

It's too cold to eat out.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

The economy often absorbs the impact of snowstorms, such as this week's storm, without much trouble, but this winter the weather is doing more damage than usual.

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The Two-Way
4:33 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

RadioShack To Close 1,000 Stores Nationwide Amid Big Losses

People walk by a Radio Shack storefront on Tuesday in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:10 pm

RadioShack said Tuesday it will close 1,100 retail stores across the country amid a disappointing fourth quarter, in a sign that the electronics retailer is ceding ever-more market share to big box stores and online providers, such as Amazon.

CEO Joseph Magnacca said the closings would leave the company with more than 4,000 U.S. stores still operating. RadioShack did not say which of its stores it planned to shutter.

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Law
3:52 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

High Court Extends Whistleblower Protections

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 7:33 am

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that a federal whistleblower law, enacted after the collapse of Enron Corporation, protects not just the employees of a public company, but also company contractors like lawyers, accountants, and investment funds.

Writing for the six-justice majority, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said that in enacting the Sarbanes-Oxley law in 2002, Congress provided protection from retaliation for employees and contractors alike to ensure that they would not be intimidated into silence when they knew of corporate wrongdoing.

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NPR Story
3:49 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Song Of The Week: Phantogram's 'Fall in Love'

Phantogram is an electronic rock duo from New York state. (phantogrammusic.virb.com)

NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson joins us each week to introduce us to a new song. This week it’s “Fall in Love” by New York electronic rock duo Phantogram. Thompson says Phantogram’s sound is catchy but a little bit challenging.

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NPR Story
3:49 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Catching Up With Dave Barry

An 11-year-old Jeremy Hobson (left) is pictured with Dave Barry and Chris Jeckel in 1993 at Willard Airport in Savoy, Ill. (WILL)

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson first spoke to humorist Dave Barry back in 1993. At that time, Hobson was an 11-year-old interviewer for “Treehouse Radio” for radio station WILL in Urbana, Illinois.

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NPR Story
3:49 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

IBM Slashes Jobs

IBM was once one of the country’s largest employers. Considered a major innovator in the high tech world, IBM was also a place where workers could count on having a job throughout their entire career.

But IBM is now going through a major restructuring after sustaining years of losses. These changes could result in some 13,000 layoffs, both in the U.S. and abroad. Some of these layoffs have already started, but the company will not confirm any numbers.

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The Two-Way
3:48 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

D.C. Council Votes To Decriminalize Some Marijuana Use

Marijuana plants in Seattle.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 4:22 pm

The District of Columbia Council moved Tuesday to decriminalize some use of marijuana.

The Washington Post reports Mayor Vincent Gray said he intends to sign the bill into law, pitting the district directly against the federal government, which still considers smoking marijuana a criminal offense.

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The Record
3:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

In Rio, A Universe Of Samba

Sitting around what looks like a conference table with a small group of musicians, guitarist Moacyr Luz (center) leads his samba group.
Courtesy of QK

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

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Education
3:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

As a Test Gets Phased Out In Chicago, Some Boycott Its Final Year

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It's testing time in Illinois today. Hundreds of thousands of students began taking state tests in math and science but some students, parents, even teachers are refusing. At dozens of schools in Chicago, they're staging a boycott, saying the tests don't matter. As NPR's Cheryl Corley reports, it's part of a growing national debate over measuring student performance.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: Boycott the ISAT. Let things be. Boycott the ISAT.

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News
3:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Among Soldiers, Risk Of Suicide May Have Surprising Roots

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

For years, people in the military had a lower rate of suicide than their civilian counterparts. About 10 years ago that started to change and now the rate is worse for soldiers than civilians. That prompted the largest-ever study of suicide among soldiers, in cooperation with the National Institutes of Health. The study is on-going, but three initial articles have been published.

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Around the Nation
3:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

In Boston, Gay Groups Remain Closed Out Of St. Patrick's Day Parade

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh says he's still hopeful for a deal allowing a gay group to march in South Boston's St. Patrick's Day Parade. Organizers say talks to include gay groups for the first time in two decades have fallen apart. Walsh, the son of Irish immigrants, is still trying to bring the sides together.

NPR's Tovia Smith reports.

TOVIA SMITH, BYLINE: Gay rights activists called it historic that they were even talking to parade organizers. But now, chances for a deal are slipping.

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News
3:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Putin Speaks, Decries U.S. For 'Experimenting On Rats' In Ukraine

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

In Moscow, Russian President Vladimir Putin defended his position on Ukraine. In a news conference, Putin denied that Russian troops are in Crimea but reserved the right to use force in Ukraine.

Politics
3:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Obama Budget: A Blueprint With Little Chance Of Passage

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

President Obama is announcing his 2015 budget Tuesday. It calls for increased tax credits for the poor and boosted infrastructure spending, but it's unlikely to be enacted by Congress.

News
3:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Kerry's In Kiev And He Comes Bearing Gifts — One Billion Of Them

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

Secretary of State John Kerry is in Kiev Tuesday, offering $1 billion in American loan guarantees and promises of technical assistance to the new Ukrainian government.

Strange News
3:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Fake Chef, Real Recipes — And The Food's Disgusting

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

Nick Preuher is no chef; he only plays one on TV. More accurately, he has pretended to be one, appearing on various local morning television shows as a prank.

Latin America
3:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

World Cup Woes Loom For One Brazilian City

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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Politics
3:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

George P. Bush Steps Into Texas Political Limelight

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

George P. Bush is expected to win Tuesday's GOP primary for land commissioner. Ben Phillpott of KUT brings the story of the young Bush's low-key campaign and outreach to Hispanic voters.

World Cafe
3:16 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Jonatha Brooke On World Cafe

Jonatha Brooke.
Sandrine Lee Courtesy of the artist

Jonatha Brooke is an artist who is always stretching — sometimes quite literally, like when she was a dancer at Amherst College. It was there Brooke met classmate Jennifer Kimball and formed The Story, her first band.

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The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Russian TV Host Who Slammed Moscow Says She Won't Go To Crimea

Host Abby Martin of RT America's Breaking the Set.
RT America

The Kremlin-backed Russia Today television channel says a program host who delivered a show-closing commentary denouncing Moscow's intervention in Ukraine will be sent to Crimea to "make up her own mind." But the anchor herself begs to differ.

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

'The Fact Is These Are Russian Forces,' Says Ukraine's Ambassador To U.S.

Troops under Russian command scream orders to turn back before firing warning shots at the Belbek airbase in Crimea. The troops were reacting to a large group of unarmed Ukrainian troops who approached them.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 7:17 pm

Despite what Russia's President Vladimir Putin might say, the country's approach to Ukraine is a "gross violation of international law," says Ukraine's ambassador to the U.S., Olexander Motsyk.

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Parallels
1:47 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Ukraine: From Breadbasket To Basket Case

Ukrainians line up to get money from a bank machine in the western city of Lviv on Feb. 20. The country's political crisis has also created economic turmoil. The international community is expected to pump billions of dollars into Ukraine's struggling economy.
Yuriy Dyachyshyn AFP/Getty Images

Ukraine was known as the breadbasket of the Soviet Union for its fertile fields of wheat. Now it's just a basket case. The outgoing finance minister said the country needed $35 billion to stave off bankruptcy over the next couple years.

Some analysts say that figure may be on the high side. Still, such admissions usually send potential donors dashing for the exits. Yet one thing Ukraine has in abundance these days, in addition to political turmoil, is a long line of financial suitors.

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Author Interviews
1:46 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Fresh Air Remembers Literary Biographer Justin Kaplan

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. We're going to remember Justin Kaplan, the Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer who also edited the 16th edition of "Bartlett's Familiar Quotations," published in 1992 and the 17th edition, published in 2002. Justin Kaplan died Sunday at the age 88. His first book, a 1966 biography of Mark Twain, won a National Book Award, as well as a Pulitzer Prize. He also wrote biographies of Walt Whitman and Lincoln Steffens.

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Author Interviews
1:46 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Kevin Young On Blues, Poetry And 'Laughing To Keep From Crying'

Kevin Young's 2012 essay collection The Grey Album: On The Blackness Of Blackness was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.
Melanie Dunea CPi

In Kevin Young's new collection, Book Of Hours, poems about the death of his father appear alongside poems about the birth of his son.

He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that, in a way, those events were the anchors of his life.

"It was a way of just writing about what had happened and also the way that the cycle of life informed my life, from death to birth to ... a kind of rebirth that I felt afterward."

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All Tech Considered
1:46 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

By The Time Your Car Goes Driverless, You Won't Know The Difference

Mercedes' S500 Intelligent Drive is one traditional carmaker's approach to driverless cars.
Johannes Eisele AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 8:23 am

If you've heard about autonomous vehicles — cars that drive themselves — you probably associate them with Google, which is working on fully autonomous vehicles that will drive us to and fro while we're safely texting on our Android phones.

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The Two-Way
1:33 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

After 5-Decade Career, NPR's Carl Kasell Will Retire

Doby Photography NPR

After a five-decade career in broadcasting, Carl Kasell announced his retirement on Tuesday.

Carl will record his final broadcast for Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me! this spring. He will, however, remain "scorekeeper emeritus" for the show. Before becoming the official scorekeeper for the NPR news quiz show in 1998, Carl anchored the newscast for Morning Edition.

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The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

'12 Years A Slave' Leads To Correction Of 161-Year-Old Story

In Twelve Years A Slave, Chiwetel Ejiofor plays Solomon Northup, who was kidnapped and sold into slavery.
Jaap Buitendijk Fox Searchlight Pictures

Here's something of another victory for new media over old media.

The New York Times on Tuesday corrected a 161-year-old report about the enslavement of Solomon Northup, after a Twitter user pointed out that the story had twice misspelled Northup's name — including in the headline.

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