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Crime In The City
2:23 am
Thu August 7, 2014

Mystery Writer Evokes The Sights, Sound And Grime Of 1970s New York

The Empire State Building shines while Greenwich Village remains dark during the 1977 New York City blackout.
Carlos Rene Perez AP

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 8:08 am

Crime fiction writer Lawrence Block lives in New York's West Village, in a stately art deco building overlooking Abingdon Square. He bought an apartment there decades before actress Jennifer Aniston did. (She sold hers shortly thereafter.) Block is 76, silver-haired and keen-eyed; and in his pastel shirt and khakis, he looks decidedly more Hamptons than downtown.

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Parallels
2:22 am
Thu August 7, 2014

When And How To Die: Germany Debates Whose Choice It Is

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 7:49 am

Stefan Daniel says he has no control over the multiple sclerosis that is short-circuiting his body.

The disease, which attacks the nervous system, has forced the 51-year-old German psychologist to give up his career and most hobbies, including running and photography.

He spends his days in an electric wheelchair and rarely ventures out of his Berlin apartment.

"It's so difficult for me to open the door," he laments.

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Music
1:01 am
Thu August 7, 2014

Working And Dating In LA, Living To Sing The Tale

Kate Micucci (left) and Riki Lindhome play a fictional version of their real-life joke-folk duo Garfunkel and Oates in a new scripted comedy on IFC.
Darren Michaels SMPSP/IFC

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 9:43 am

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The Two-Way
11:46 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Federal Judges Weigh Gay Marriage Cases From 4 States

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 9:52 am

A panel of three federal judges heard arguments in six same-sex marriage cases Wednesday. The cases from Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee "pit states' rights and traditional, conservative values against what plaintiffs' attorneys say is a fundamental right to marry under the U.S. Constitution," The Associated Press writes.

Ann Thompson of member station WVXU in Cincinnati summed up the arguments for our Newscast Desk:

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The Two-Way
6:42 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Obama: 'I Have No Green Light' To Act Without Congress

At a news conference Wednesday, President Obama spoke mostly about foreign policy but also answered questions about his actions in the U.S.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 7:16 pm

In a news conference Wednesday that was largely about international relations and trade, President Obama also addressed the limits of his own authority at home.

"I never have a green light," Obama said. "I'm bound by the Constitution; I'm bound by the separation of powers."

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The Two-Way
6:32 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Bank Of America 'Close' To Settlement With Justice Department

Bank of America would pay more than $16 billion in a settlement that it's close to finalizing with the Justice Department.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 6:48 pm

Bank of America and the Justice department are "close" to finalizing a settlement of $16 billion to $17 billion over allegations of mortgage-related abuses.

The Wall Street Journal first reported on the outlines of a deal, which was then confirmed to NPR by a source familiar with the talks.

A final announcement may come next week or later, NPR's Jim Zarroli reports for our Newscast Desk.

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The Salt
6:06 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Mass. To Make Big Food Wasters Lose The Landfill

The Massachusetts Water Resources Agency will begin accepting food waste at its Deer Island anaerobic digester near Boston to produce biogas in 2014.
Rachel Schowalter/Massachusetts Clean Energy Center/Flickr

Originally published on Wed August 13, 2014 2:50 pm

Sure, there's plenty you can do with leftovers: foist them on your office mates or turn them into casserole.

But if you're a big food waste generator like a hospital or a supermarket, your scraps usually go to the landfill to rot.

In Massachusetts, that's about to change, as the state prepares to implement the most ambitious commercial food waste ban in the U.S.

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Shots - Health News
3:48 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Do You Want To Be Happy? Don't Set Your Expectations Too High

Originally published on Fri August 8, 2014 11:40 am

Sure, money can't buy you love, but it's hard to imagine that winning rewards won't make us happy.

It does, researchers say, but only if our immediate expectations aren't bigger than the size of the payoff. Disappointment squelches happiness.

"Your happiness increases only if you do better than you expected," says Robb Rutledge, a neuroscientist and senior research associate at University College London. "Just having a bigger salary isn't enough to make you happy."

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The Salt
3:44 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Truth In Labeling: Celiac Community Cheers FDA Rule For Gluten Free

An FDA rule effective Aug. 5 states that foods may be labeled "gluten free" only if there's less than 20 parts per million of the protein.
James Benet iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 6:29 pm

If you spot a food package label that says gluten free, you can now be pretty well assured that the label means what it says.

As of Aug. 5, all food manufacturers must be in compliance with a new labeling standard set by the Food and Drug Administration.

The rule states that foods may be labeled "gluten free" only if there's less than 20 parts per million of the protein.

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All Tech Considered
3:44 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Is Your Watch Or Thermostat A Spy? Cybersecurity Firms Are On It

After Grant Hernandez, an undergraduate security researcher at the University of Central Florida, hacked Nest, he programmed it to riff off a favorite line from the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey.
Aarti Shahani NPR

Originally published on Fri November 7, 2014 10:15 am

There is a sharp divide in the technology world. One camp is racing to connect our devices to the Internet, to make everything — from the watch to the refrigerator — smart, so to speak.

The other camp is terrified of what that means: everyday objects that can be hacked, easily, to spy on us and hand off valuable data to cybercriminals. The cynics are gathered in Las Vegas this week, at the security conference Black Hat.

The Nest Hacker

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Around the Nation
3:44 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Carroll, Iowa: Where The Childhood Paper Route Is Alive And Well

It takes Jaxson Kuhlmann, 11, less than 30 minutes to complete his paper route in Carroll, Iowa. He's paid 10 to 12 cents per copy to deliver the paper five days a week.
Noah Adams for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 11:21 am

This story began in 2012 while I was working on a story in Iowa. I was taking pictures on a foggy afternoon and saw a young girl on a blue bicycle, a newspaper bag slung across her shoulder. She stopped and held up a copy of The Daily Times Herald.

These days, most newspapers are delivered by fast-moving adults driving vans and trucks. I guess I didn't know that kids still had paper routes, anywhere.

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The Two-Way
3:34 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Donald Trump Sues To Remove His Name From Atlantic City Casinos

The Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City is planning to close its doors on Sept. 16.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 5:02 pm

Donald Trump once promoted Atlantic City's casino and entertainment business. He no longer wants his name associated with it.

The real estate baron has sued to have his name taken off two casinos, the Trump Plaza and the Trump Taj Mahal.

"I want it off both of them," Trump told the Associated Press. "I've been away from Atlantic City for many years. People think we operate [the company], and we don't. It's not us. It's not me."

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Goats and Soda
3:24 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

As Ebola Spreads in Nigeria, Debate About Experimental Drugs Grows

A Nigerian health official screens passengers for signs of Ebola at the Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos on Monday.
Sunday Alamba AP

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 8:44 am

As the Ebola virus continues its deadly march through West Africa, keeping track of developments can be a challenge. Here's a roundup of the latest news this week:

The Toll

The World Health Organization released updated figures Wednesday. The total number of cases — including those considered confirmed, probable or suspected — now stands at 1,711. This includes 932 deaths.

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The Thistle & Shamrock
3:02 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

The Thistle & Shamrock: New Releases And Debuts, Part 1

Hanneke Cassel is featured on this week's show.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 4:43 pm

Host Fiona Ritchie handpicks new sounds of the summer, combining artist debuts with the latest from musicians whose work has helped shape the sound of The Thistle & Shamrock. This week's show features Al Petteway, Kim Robertson, Hanneke Cassel and more.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Economy
3:02 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Construction Industry Missing Key Tool: Skilled Workers

After laying off roughly 2 million workers during the recession, the construction industry may not have enough crews to keep up with demand for building projects.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 6:56 pm

It's a beautiful day and Jeremy Smith, the business manager for a school district in northern Wyoming, is showing off the new Tongue River Elementary School — or at least the plot of land where the school should be.

"What you're going to see when you get up here a little bit closer is you are going to just see pasture," Smith says.

The school was supposed to be under construction by now, but last month state officials said they didn't have the money.

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News
3:01 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Uncertainty Stalls Recruiting Efforts For Deportation Relief

A crowd waits in line to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) in Los Angeles on the program's first day on Aug. 15, 2012.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 11:18 am

Next week marks the second anniversary of the start of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. It allows young immigrants — those who were brought to the U.S. illegally before turning 16 — to avoid deportation and get a work permit for two years.

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Business
3:01 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Who's The Boss? Labor Board Says It's McDonald's, As Much As Franchisee

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 6:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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NPR Ed
3:00 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Play Doesn't End With Childhood: Why Adults Need Recess Too

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 6:29 pm

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

More and more research suggests that healthy playtime leads to healthy adulthood.

Childhood play is essential for brain development. As we've reported this week, time on the playground may be more important than time in the classroom.

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Recipes
3:00 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

The Tale Of The Bavarian Plum Tart Redux

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 6:23 pm

Early August is a good time for Damson plums, and an even better time for an encore about the Zwetschgendatschi, a plum tart with an intimidating name. Vermont pastry chef Gesine Bullock-Prado says the tart reminds her of her late mother.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Remembrances
3:00 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

From Surgeon General To Smoking Foe: Remembering Dr. Steinfeld

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 6:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Africa
3:00 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Plotting The American Role In Fighting The AIDS Epidemic

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 6:29 pm

Among the topics discussed at the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit this week was the ongoing AIDS epidemic. Melissa Block talks with Ambassador Deborah Birx, the U.S. global AIDS coordinator. Birx oversees the program known as PEPFAR — the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. Birx talks about combating complacency, as well as the human rights issues that are making it harder for groups to reach some of the most vulnerable populations.

Europe
3:00 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Ukraine Faces Buildup Outside The Border And Fatigue Within

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 6:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Africa
3:00 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Ebola Casts A Shadow Over Obama's Africa Press Conference

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 6:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Energy
3:00 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Up Close And Personal With A 40-Story Oil Rig In The Gulf

Shell's Olympus production platform and drilling rig is located about 130 miles south of New Orleans. It is 406 feet tall and weighs more than 120,000 tons.
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 6:29 pm

The U.S. is in the middle of an oil drilling boom that few people saw coming. After decades of decline, crude oil production is rising again. Technologies such as hydraulic fracturing in places such as North Dakota are getting a lot of attention. But the Gulf of Mexico still accounts for more than one-fifth of domestic oil production.

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World Cafe
2:56 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Ernest Ranglin On World Cafe

Ernest Ranglin.
Tony Zucker Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 4:21 pm

Jamaican guitarist Ernest Ranglin was born in 1932, and was there for the creation of the Jamaican music scene as we know it. Much evidence suggests that Ranglin was the one who turned the beat around and invented ska, the building block of reggae and all Jamaican music that has followed.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Music From The Show

Ratatat, “Falcon Jab”

Aesop Rock, “Forest Crunk”

Ben Jordan, “Leaving Earth”

Bear In Heaven, “Autumn”

Aesop Rock, “Cycles To GeHenna”

The Album Leaf, “Thule”

Konk, “Baby Dee”

The American Dollar, “Time”

LCD Soundsystem, “Dance Yrslf Clean”

Debruit, “Nigeria What?”

Lifeformed, “Cider Time”

Faraquet, “Conceptual Separation Of Self”

Nah Dran, “Couch”

Fugazi, “Target”

Bo Diddley, “Bo’s Guitar”

Tame Impala, “Enders Toi”

The Evens, “Shelter Two”

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The Two-Way
2:29 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Walgreens Drops Plan To Move Headquarters — And Profits — Overseas

Last month, demonstrators protested the possibility of Walgreens moving its corporate headquarters overseas at a Chicago location of the pharmacy.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 5:46 pm

Walgreens Co. will complete its merger with Alliance Boots, a British pharmacy, but it will not move its headquarters overseas to reduce its U.S. tax bill.

Walgreens will pay $15 billion, including $5 billion in cash, to purchase the remaining 55 percent of Alliance Boots. The two companies began merging in 2012.

Walgreens had flirted with the idea of moving its headquarters from Chicago to the United Kingdom to avoid paying corporate taxes in the U.S.

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Shots - Health News
2:02 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Brief Counseling May Not Help With Most Drug Problems

The notion that brief interventions can catch — and stop — problem drinking started in the 1960s.
Jorge Salcedo iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 11:19 am

Beating a drug habit is usually a long process that includes talk therapy and, sometimes, medicine. Checking into a rehab facility can help many people, too.

But it can be hard to persuade someone to commit to that long-term treatment. So public health officials lately have been cutting to the chase — urging doctors in primary care and in hospital emergency rooms to question all patients regarding drug use, then offer those with a drug problem a 10- or 15-minute counseling session, right then and there.

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Music
1:56 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

A Label Paramount To Early Blues And Jazz

There's nothing a certain type of record collector likes better than finding a stack of 78s on the Paramount label. Between 1917 and 1932, the label, which was one of several run by a furniture company in Grafton, Wisc., released thousands of records, but its real accomplishment was recording some of the greatest early blues and jazz performers.

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Asia
1:42 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Malaysia Flight Wreckage Was 'Like The End Of The World'

Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down on July 17 in eastern Ukraine. The New York Times reporter Sabrina Tavernise was one of the first reporters to arrive at the scene.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 1:56 pm

Sabrina Tavernise, one of the first journalists to arrive at the site of the downed Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in eastern Ukraine last month, says it was strange how quiet it was. The wreckage was still smoldering; she was surrounded by miles of fallen bodies.

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